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I have a question concerning the mapping of entities in SQLAlchemy.

I have a transient object, which already contains foreign keys to some persistent objects. I want that SQLAlchemy fetches the referenced objects and assigns them to their relationship-attributes. From the SQLAlchemy documentation, I thought that I have to use the merge-operation on the session to achieve this. But in my configuration, it doesn't work.

This is a minimum example demonstrating my problem:

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
from sqlalchemy import create_engine
from sqlalchemy.orm import mapper
from sqlalchemy import Table, Column, Integer, String, MetaData, ForeignKey
from sqlalchemy.orm import relationship, sessionmaker

class User(object):
    def __init__(self, id, name, fullname, password, best_friend_id=None):
        self.id = id
        self.name = name
        self.fullname = fullname
        self.password = password
        self.best_friend_id = best_friend_id

    def __repr__(self):
        return "<User('%s','%s', '%s')>" % (self.name, self.fullname, self.password)


class Dog(object):
    def __init__(self, id, name):
        self.id = id
        self.name = name

    def __repr__(self):
        return "<User('%s','%s', '%s')>" % (self.name, self.fullname, self.password)

engine = create_engine('sqlite:///:memory:', echo=True)
Session = sessionmaker(bind=engine)
session = Session()
metadata = MetaData()

dogs_table = Table('dogs', metadata,
    Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True),
    Column('name', String),
)


users_table = Table('users', metadata,
    Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True),
    Column('name', String),
    Column('fullname', String),
    Column('password', String),
    Column('best_friend_id', Integer, ForeignKey('dogs.id'))
)

metadata.create_all(engine)
mapper(User, users_table, properties={'best_friend': relationship(Dog, uselist=False)})
mapper(Dog, dogs_table)

dog = Dog(id=1, name='Hasso')
lordling = User(id=2, name='John', fullname='Miller', password='very_secret', best_friend_id=1)

session.add(dog)
session.commit()

merged_lordling = session.merge(lordling)
print str(merged_lordling.best_friend.name)

I expect that merged_lordling.best_friend contains the dog 'Hasso'. But it is still None.

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Welcome to Stack Overflow! No need to add your signature - your user card is already below the post. –  Artemix Jul 5 '13 at 10:02
    
Ah, I see. Thank you for this hint. –  Jan Christian Jul 5 '13 at 10:03

1 Answer 1

I was bit by this same problem recently. Once you established a relationship, you should simply assign your Dog instance to User.best_friend directly, not explicitly using the foreign key. I don't know why exactly that happens, but while investigating a similar problem I realized that if you do that, SQLAlchemy doesn't populate the relationship property until you flushed all the related instances.

So, instead of:

dog = Dog(id=1, name='Hasso')
lordling = User(id=2, name='John', fullname='Miller', password='very_secret', 
                best_friend_id=1)

session.add(dog)

Simply do:

dog = Dog(id=1, name='Hasso')
lordling = User(id=2, name='John', fullname='Miller', password='very_secret', 
                best_friend=dog)

session.add(lordling)

Or even:

lordling = User(id=2, name='John', fullname='Miller', password='very_secret', 
                best_friend=Dog(id=1, name='Hasso'))
session.add(lordling)    

As a general rule, avoid using the foreign key columns directly when you have a relationship established. Embrace the ORM, and only assign or query directly from foreign keys when you really have no other choice. I learned that the hard way.

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