Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've looked and tried every single solution posted here, with no avail.

My problem is:

  • On a web solution (ASP.NET MVC 3 C# / Razor), I'm using Json.Net to serialize the data displayed on some reports, to be able to send it over to a WPF application. These reports results are a collection of Model objects.

  • I have the same Model objects on the WPF application, so when I deserialize the Json string, I would like to bind the results accordingly (keeping the original Model object).

  • The Assembly name and Object type are different on each end (Web / App) - different namespaces.

Here's what I've tried so far:

On the web solution:

// MyModel
public class MyModel
{
    public long Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

...

// data = IEnumerable<MyModel>
var jsonData = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(data.ToArray(), data.ToArray().GetType(), 
    new JsonSerializerSettings 
    { 
        TypeNameHandling = TypeNameHandling.All
    });

On the app:

// MyModel
public class MyModel
{
    [JsonProperty("Id")]
    public long Id { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty("Name")]            
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

...

var jsonArray = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(e.jsonObject,
    null,
    new JsonSerializerSettings
        {
            TypeNameHandling = TypeNameHandling.All,
            Binder = new MySerializationBinder()
        });

...

public class MySerializationBinder : DefaultSerializationBinder
{
    public override Type BindToType(string assemblyName, string typeName)
    {
        return typeof(MyModel);
    }
}

Can anyone give me a hand on this, please?

Thanks!

UPDATE

As per @Marc Gravell comment:

I forgot to mention the main issue here. I need to send the Object type across to the WPF app, because the listener will be expecting data from many reports - which are collections of different Models. So, when binding it back, I know which Object should be binded.

share|improve this question
    
It isn't clear to me what the problem is that you are trying to solve; normally, the resultant JSON does not contain any type information - it will just be {"Id":"123,"Name":"Foo"} - as such, you do not require any special model binding - that will deserialize into the app's MyModel just fine. What is the problem you are having? Why are you including type names in the first place? –  Marc Gravell Jul 5 '13 at 9:59
    
Updating the post... –  MelanciaUK Jul 5 '13 at 10:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I stand by my original answer - type information in serialization data is just really messy - it would be far better to change the code not to need this, but to "fix" it (not sure that is the right word) - look carefully at the typeName - it isn't always what you are expecting:

public class MySerializationBinder : DefaultSerializationBinder
{
    public override Type BindToType(string assemblyName, string typeName)
    {
        switch(typeName)
        {
            case "WebSolution.MyModel[]": return typeof(Application.MyModel[]);
            case "WebSolution.MyModel": return typeof(Application.MyModel);
            default: return base.BindToType(assemblyName, typeName);
        }

    }
}

Incidentally, once the array type is known, the element type is implicit - so you can save some effort by only including the array type:

        new JsonSerializerSettings
        {
            TypeNameHandling = TypeNameHandling.Arrays
        }

But I still advise: don't do it this way.


The "mistake" here is including the full type names in the first place; the presence of type names in json should usually be the warning sign of a code-smell. Remove those, and there is nothing to do - it just works:

using Newtonsoft.Json;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
static class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        // here imagine we're in the web tier, serializing
        var data = GetData();
        var jsonData = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(
            data.ToArray(), Formatting.None);
        // now imagine we're at the application, deserializing
        var appData = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Application.MyModel[]>(
            jsonData);
        // and it all works fine
    }
    static IEnumerable<WebSolution.MyModel> GetData()
    {
        yield return new WebSolution.MyModel { Id = 123, Name = "abc" };
        yield return new WebSolution.MyModel { Id = 456, Name = "def" };
    }
}

namespace WebSolution
{
    // MyModel
    public class MyModel
    {
        public long Id { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
}

namespace Application
{
    // MyModel
    public class MyModel
    {
        [JsonProperty("Id")]
        public long Id { get; set; }
        [JsonProperty("Name")]
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Check my update, please. The problem is I don't know which Model is coming serialized to be able to deserialize back into it. That's why I'm including the $type when serializing. –  MelanciaUK Jul 5 '13 at 10:14
    
@MelanciaUK edited answer –  Marc Gravell Jul 5 '13 at 10:20
    
Being honest, I'm quite new to all of this, so it's great that you pointed out something that could cause me problems in the future. Living and learning! I'll give a go following your example and see if I can achieve the result I'm expecting. Thank you very much. –  MelanciaUK Jul 5 '13 at 10:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.