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I'm comparing performance of this F# function:

let e28 N =                               
  seq {for i in 2L..2L..N do for j in 1..4 -> i} |> Seq.scan (+) 1L |> Seq.sum  

with Python 3.3 equivalents:

def e28a(N = 100000):
    diagNumber = 1                             
    sum        = diagNumber                
    for width in range(2, N+1, 2):
        for j in range(4):          
            diagNumber += width             
            sum        += diagNumber            
    return sum

import itertools as it
def e28b(N = 100000):
    return sum(it.accumulate(it.chain([1], (i for i in range(2, N+1, 2) for j in range(4)))))    

import numpy as np
def e28c(N = 100000):
    return np.sum(np.cumsum(np.fromiter(chain([1], (i for i in range(2, N+1, 2) for j in range(4))), np.int64)))

and I'm getting 64-bit CPython 3.3.1 performance on Windows 7 about 574 times slower than C++. Here are the times for N = 100000:

e28: 23ms; e28a: 48.4ms; e28b: 49.7ms; e28c: 40.2ms; C++ version: 0.07ms

Is there a low hanging fruit in optimizing Python code without altering the underlying algorithm?

share|improve this question
    
didn't have to time to look at all of your code but seems like using generators could help – K DawG Jul 5 '13 at 12:13
    
@KDawG e28b and e28c are using generators. – Paul Jurczak Jul 5 '13 at 12:58
1  
How are you even getting e28 to run for N=100000? I get an arithmetic overflow, unless I annotate everything to be int64s. – Kit Jul 5 '13 at 14:56
    
@Kit Good catch, I made a cut and paste error again. It's corrected now and ludicrous speed F# performance is no more. – Paul Jurczak Jul 5 '13 at 15:39
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using your F# version I got:

> e28(100000L);;
Real: 00:00:00.061, CPU: 00:00:00.062, GC gen0: 2, gen1: 0, gen2: 0
val it : int64 = 666691667100001L

Using:

let e28d N =
    seq {2L..2L..N}
    |> Seq.collect(fun x->seq{yield x;yield x; yield x; yield x})
    |> Seq.scan (+) 1L
    |> Seq.sum

I got:

> e28d(100000L);;
Real: 00:00:00.040, CPU: 00:00:00.031, GC gen0: 2, gen1: 0, gen2: 0
val it : int64 = 666691667100001L

You will probably have a difficult time getting the python to perform quite as well as the F# simply since F# is compiled and Python is interpreted. That being said, the above improvement will work for the python as well:

>>> def e28a(N = 100000):
    diagNumber = 1;                            
    sum        = diagNumber;                   
    for width in range(2, N+1, 2):
        for j in range(4):          
            diagNumber += width;                
            sum        += diagNumber;           
    return sum;

>>> if __name__ == '__main__':
    import timeit
    print(timeit.timeit("e28a()", setup="from __main__ import e28a", number=10))


0.5249497228663813
>>> def e28a(N = 100000):
    diagNumber = 1;
    sum        = diagNumber;
    for width in range(2, N+1, 2):
        diagNumber += width;
        sum        += diagNumber;
        diagNumber += width;
        sum        += diagNumber;
        diagNumber += width;
        sum        += diagNumber;
        diagNumber += width;
        sum        += diagNumber;
    return sum;

>>> if __name__ == '__main__':
    import timeit
    print(timeit.timeit("e28a()", setup="from __main__ import e28a", number=10))


0.2585966329330063
>>> 

Part of this improvement comes from fewer function calls, i.e.:

>>> def e28a(N = 100000):
    diagNumber = 1;                            
    sum        = diagNumber;
    temp_range = range(4)             #Change here
    for width in range(2, N+1, 2):
        for j in temp_range:          #Change here
            diagNumber += width;                
            sum        += diagNumber;           
    return sum;

>>> if __name__ == '__main__':
    import timeit
    print(timeit.timeit("e28a()", setup="from __main__ import e28a", number=10))


0.40251470339956086
>>> 

And I think the other part comes from removing the loop. Both of these can be fairly expensive in Python.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm going to guess that the performance improvement comes from not having to iterate in order to generate four instances of the same value. – mydogisbox Jul 5 '13 at 18:34
    
Nice, It improves both performance and readability! What I'm actually looking for is improvement in Python code performance, F# is there just to illustrate the algorithm used. – Paul Jurczak Jul 5 '13 at 21:42
1  
Note my changes to the python. Basically just apply my F# improvement to the python for a 50% improvement! – mydogisbox Jul 5 '13 at 22:51
    
Inner loop unrolling helps a lot: 48.4ms -> 22.3ms. The code is probably more readable, just a bit too verbose. Thank you. – Paul Jurczak Jul 5 '13 at 23:11

The F# version can be sped up by ~10x by switching to a procedural, mutable approach (like your python e28a). When the "payload operation" (in this case, just +) is so trivial, the use of combinators ends up adding a relatively significant overhead. As a side note, Seq.sum uses checked arithmetic, which also adds a touch of overhead.

One of the nice things about F# is that you can fall back to procedural/mutable style if needed for a perf-critical hot path.

let e28_original N =
  seq {
    for i in 2UL..2UL..N do 
        for j in 1..4 do
            yield i
  }
  |> Seq.scan (+) 1UL
  |> Seq.sum

let e28_mutable N = 
  let mutable sum = 1UL
  let mutable total = sum                            
  for i in 2UL..2UL..N do 
      for j in 1..4 do
         sum <- sum + i
         total <- total + sum
  total

let time f =
    f () |> ignore // allow for warmup / JIT
    let sw = System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.StartNew()
    let result = f ()
    sw.Stop()
    printfn "Result: %A Elapsed: %A" result sw.Elapsed

time (fun _ -> e28_original 100000UL)
time (fun _ -> e28_mutable 100000UL)

Result

Result: 666691667100001UL Elapsed: 00:00:00.0429414
Result: 666691667100001UL Elapsed: 00:00:00.0034971
share|improve this answer
1  
You can improve this almost another 10% by unrolling the inner loop like this: for i in 2UL..2UL..N do sum <- sum + i total <- total + sum sum <- sum + i total <- total + sum sum <- sum + i total <- total + sum sum <- sum + i total <- total + sum – mydogisbox Jul 5 '13 at 20:55
    
I was looking for Python code speedup, but since I provided an imperative Python sample (e28a) in the mix, it is only fair to have an imperative F# one. It's an order of magnitude faster - good to know. Thank you. – Paul Jurczak Jul 5 '13 at 23:19
    
Kudos for time function! I've run out of standard clock resolution and this is a big help. Your e28_mutable speedup is 23ms -> 1.58ms. – Paul Jurczak Jul 6 '13 at 0:18

This is almost twice as fast on my machine. It uses memoization, and also basic arithmetic deduction.

You have to define a global variable.

summi=2

def e28d(N = 100000):
    def memo(width):
        global summi
        summi+=width*4+4
        return summi-width*2+2
    x= sum((memo(width*4)) for width in range (2, N+1, 2))+1
    return x 

Results:
e28a:

0.0591201782227 seconds

e28d:

0.0349650382996 seconds

Hope it is at least constructive. Note: you would have to modulate it according to whether the number is odd or not.

Update: Here is a function that runs about a hundred times faster in python (about 0.5 ms for N=100000), by avoiding loops totally:

import math
def e28e(X = 100000):
    keyint, keybool=int(X/6), X%6
    if keybool/2==0: keyvar=(16*keyint+sum(range(keyint))*12)
    elif keybool/2==1: keyvar=(44*keyint+sum(range(keyint))*36+7) 
    else: keyvar=(28*(keyint+1)+sum(range(keyint+1))*60-2)
    X-=keybool%2
    diag= math.pow(X,2)+2*X+1
    newvar=keyint+int(X/2)+1
    summ= int(diag*newvar+keyvar)
    return summ
share|improve this answer
    
After indenting last 2 lines, I'm getting NameError: global name 'summi' is not defined. I added initialization summi=0, but the result returned is slightly off: 666691667050001 instead of 666691667100001 :-( It is faster though. – Paul Jurczak Jul 5 '13 at 14:34
    
SOrry, I originally posted a solution that gives that answer. However, the current post (edited about an hour ago) gives the correct Answer. Note the "N/2." That's also the part that has to be rounded down if it is odd. – IntheNoob Jul 5 '13 at 15:11
    
Actually, to be clear, re: even/oddness of N, all you have to do is make sure returned value is int, and you will be fine. – IntheNoob Jul 5 '13 at 15:26
    
Did this work for you at all? Just curious. I guess in theory the principle is mathematical so it could be applied to any language, although I don't know how much of a difference it would make in a compiled language. – IntheNoob Jul 6 '13 at 12:00
    
When i run it in CPython 3.3.1 it still produces the wrong result: 666691667050001.0 – Paul Jurczak Jul 6 '13 at 20:17

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