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I have started web-programming for only 13 days on Codeacademy.com and find it a good place to learn. But I still sometimes misunderstand things. I always check them on w3school.com ,but this time I couldn't find the information that I needed. So as I learned there are 2 types of creating objects first: object literal notation and second: Object constructor. I have learned that there are also methods and functions, but I couldn't understand how to create a method in object literal notation? In object constructor I just write : `

var bob = new Object();
bob.age = 30;
bob.setAge = function (newAge)
{
bob.age = newAge;
};

Can you please tell me how to do the same when writing object literal notation.

var bob = {
age: 30
};
share|improve this question
    
Please forget about w3schools. It's a terrible resource. Use MDN instead. And instead of new Object(), you would better simply use {}. –  kapa Jul 5 '13 at 10:39
    
If you want to use functions on your object instances (like creating several person objects) then defining the same function for every object isn't realy effective. In JavaScript you can use constructor functions and set shared properties (like functions) on it's prototype: stackoverflow.com/questions/16063394/… –  HMR Jul 5 '13 at 10:56
    
My code still doesn't work, should I write it here or create a new question? I am new at stackoverflow :) –  Vato Jul 5 '13 at 11:01
    
yea I understood that it wasn't effective, but I did it this way just to understand how methods and functions work on objects. but, thanks I am glad to learn more and will read about shared properties on it's prototype :) –  Vato Jul 5 '13 at 11:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Syntactically, the change is very simple :

var bob = {
  age: 30,
  setAge: function (newAge) {
    bob.age = newAge;
  }
};

But as you can see, there's a problem : as in your code it uses the external bob variable so this wouldn't work if you change the value of the bob variable.

You can fix that with

var bob = {
  age: 30,
  setAge: function (newAge) {
    this.age = newAge;
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
thanks I'll try it :) –  Vato Jul 5 '13 at 10:40
    
I think the question was only on how to get the same result as in the first snippet :-) Whether to usse this or a variable is discussed here already –  Bergi Jul 5 '13 at 10:46
    
My code still doesn't work, should I write it here or create a new question? (I am new at stackoverflow) :) –  Vato Jul 5 '13 at 11:02
    
You probably should ask a new question but this question should show your not working code (short enough) and explain why you think it doesn't work and what's the intended result. –  dystroy Jul 5 '13 at 11:04

Its nothing different and as easy as

var bob = {
    age:     30,
    setAge:  function( newAge ) {
        this.age = newAge;
    }
};

Alternatively, you can create a real setter function either by invoking Object.defineProperty() or as simple as

var bob = {
    age:       30,
    firstName: 'j',
    lastName:  'Andy',
    set setName( newName ) {
        var spl = newName.split( /\s+/ );
        this.firstName = spl[ 0 ];
        this.lastName  = spl[ 1 ];
    }
}

Where you could go like

bob.setName = "Thomas Cook";  // which sets firstName to "Thomas" and lastName to "Cook"
share|improve this answer
    
thank you, I'll now continue my journey :) –  Vato Jul 5 '13 at 10:40
1  
You wouldn't call a setter property setX :-) –  Bergi Jul 5 '13 at 10:42
    
@Bergi I knew somebody would complain :p –  jAndy Jul 5 '13 at 10:42
1  
@jAndy Seriously, it's ugly :) –  dystroy Jul 5 '13 at 10:46
    
I guess the point here is more important than beauty. –  jAndy Jul 5 '13 at 10:51

Like this:

var bob = {
    age: 30,
    setAge: function (age) {
        this.age = age;
    }
}
alert(bob.age); // 30
bob.setAge(45); // set age = 45
alert(bob.age); // 45
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The last code you posted is missing a comma. Also, you don't need a ';' after a function definition of an object's property. Like this:

var object2 = {
name: "Fred",
age: 28,
club: "Fluminense",
bio2: function (){
    console.log(this.name +" is "+ this.age + " years old and he is playing in "+             this.club);
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
That has been moved to another question: stackoverflow.com/questions/17487840/… –  Bergi Jul 5 '13 at 11:39

This is the way to solve this exercise using literal object creation method:

var setAge = function (newAge) {
  this.age = newAge;
};

var bob = new Object();
bob.age = 30;
bob.setAge = setAge;

var susan = {
    age: 25,
    setAge: setAge
}

susan.setAge(35);
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