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I have been looking into .NET assemblies using ILSpy. I would like to know where is "IS" (and "AS") keyword defined so I can take a look at its definition, to see how "IS" operator is defined inside .NET. Thank you

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You will not find a 'definition' of a keyword there.. You can only find what operations that keyword causes.. –  quetzalcoatl Jul 5 '13 at 10:42
3  
They are language constructs handled by the compiler and won't feature as a type definition anywhere. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 5 '13 at 10:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

They are defined in the language specification for C# and implemented in the compiler, no particular assembly. Although the functionality needed to make it work at runtime should be in mscorlib the Just In Time Compiler.

If you red the standard for C# 4 at ECMA (linked above) you will find the the is operator in the section 14.9.10 and as operator in the section 14.9.11.

When compiled the is operator becomes the Isinst instruction:

public bool IsDateTime(object o)
{
    return o is DateTime;
}

becomes:

.method public hidebysig instance bool IsDateTime(object o) cil managed
{
  .maxstack  8
  ldarg.1
  isinst     [mscorlib]System.DateTime
  ldnull
  cgt.un
  ret
}

The as operator may also be compiled to the Isinst instruction:

public String AsString(object o)
{
    return o as String;
}

becomes:

.method public hidebysig instance string AsString(object o) cil managed
{
    .maxstack  8
    ldarg.1     
    isinst     [mscorlib]System.String
    ret
}

These instructions are defined in the Common Language Infraestructure specification, Isinst is defined in the section III.4.6.

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What do you mean the functionality needed to make it work at runtime should be in mscorlib? It's not like is gets translated into a method call or anything like that. –  Rawling Jul 5 '13 at 10:54

Keywords are part of the language, not the API.

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But someone has to define the operator, is there a language specification anywhere? –  Antun Tun Jul 5 '13 at 10:42
    
Yes, you can find the PDFs i.e. on MSDN. –  quetzalcoatl Jul 5 '13 at 10:43
    
    
@AntunTun, here you have msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/ms228593.aspx –  ElmoVanKielmo Jul 5 '13 at 10:43
    
Thank you all, really –  Antun Tun Jul 5 '13 at 10:44

Both is and as are translated directly into CIL instruction Isinst. And cast operator is translated into Castclass.

You can learn a bit more about these instructions from the CLI speficication.

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is and as are language elements, like for, while, switch, foreach and such. They're not defined in any assembly.

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