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Like Anonymous Methods ,the delegates i am declaring down using "delegate" keyword are anonymous delegates?

namespace Test
{
    public delegate void MyDelegate();
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            DelegateTest tst = new DelegateTest();
            tst.Chaining();
            Console.ReadKey(true);
        }
    }

    class DelegateTest
    {
        public event MyDelegate del;

        public void Chaining()
        {
            del += delegate { Console.WriteLine("Hello World"); };
            del += delegate { Console.WriteLine("Good Things"); };
            del += delegate { Console.WriteLine("Wonderful World"); };
            del();
        }
    }
}
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7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Your delegate collection in the example points to a number of anonymous methods. A delegate is "just a method pointer". It doesn't matter if it points to a real method or an anonymous method.

Please see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0yw3tz5k%28VS.80%29.aspx

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There's no such thing as an "anonymous delegate" (or rather, that's not a recognised term in the C# specification, or any other .NET-related specification I'm aware of).

There are anonymous functions which include anonymous methods and lambda expressions.

Your code shows plain old anonymous methods - although they are using the one feature lambda expressions don't have: the ability to not express the parameters at all when you don't care about them.

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Umm. can you clarify on this.. we usually see "Anonymous Delegates" term used every where also there is term "Anonymous Methods" as used in MSDN, so are we wrong in saying former or both are correct.. –  Shekhar_Pro Feb 24 '11 at 9:54
    
@Shekhar_Pro: "Anonymous methods" is correct. "Anonymous delegates" is incorrect. You say that you "usually see [it] every where" - could you cite specific places? –  Jon Skeet Feb 24 '11 at 10:14
    
Not in any official document but usual terminology used by Netizens. Like... SO itself.. stackoverflow.com/search?q=anonymous+delegate .... so looks like we have gone in habit of using wrong term. –  Shekhar_Pro Feb 24 '11 at 10:22
    
@Shekhar_Pro: Yup, there's plenty of terminology which is used incorrectly :( –  Jon Skeet Feb 24 '11 at 10:24
    
Thanx for clarification...(looks like i got something to write about on my next blog post)... :) –  Shekhar_Pro Feb 24 '11 at 10:27

Yes, they are anonymous delegates (or, more specific, delegates calling an anonymous method).

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Yes. Anonymous delegates cannot be referred to directly by name, so using the delegate(){} syntax means they are anonymous.

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That's correct, you have assigned a number of anonymous methods to an event.

If you're using a newer version of c#, you can also do something similar with lambdas. for example:

class DelegateTest
{
    public event Action del;

    public void Chaining()
    {
        del += () => Console.WriteLine("Hello World");
        del += () => Console.WriteLine("Good Things");
        del += () => Console.WriteLine("Wonderful World");
        del();
    }
}
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1  
Do you mean C# 3.0 ? –  user160677 Nov 17 '09 at 13:09

They are delegates to anonymous methods. This is one way to make anonymous methods, which was available since .NET 2.0. With .NET 3.0 you can also use lambda expressions which are simpler to write (but compile to the same code). I suppose that's what you meant with "anonymouse methods". But really, they are one and the same thing.

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Lambda expressions and anonymous methods in lambda syntax are not really the same. Your statement is true if you use the lambda syntax with curly braces: (x) => {y();} –  Lucero Nov 17 '09 at 13:07

Your delegate is not anonymous. It's called MyDelegate. Delegate in CLR is a class that derives from System.MulticastDelegate and in your case it's called MyDelegate. You cannot directly derive from MulticastDelegate, C# compiler will stop you.

In your code when you assign delegates to del, the type/name of the delegate is inferred by compiler because you declared del as event of type MyDelegate.

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