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I've discovered that cElementTree is about 30 times faster than xml.dom.minidom and I'm rewriting my XML encoding/decoding code. However, I need to output XML that contains CDATA sections and there doesn't seem to be a way to do that with ElementTree.

Can it be done?

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> I need to output XML that contains CDATA sections Why? It seems a strange requirment. –  bortzmeyer Oct 15 '08 at 12:14
    
It's a requirement I have - chunks of CDATA are sometimes much more human-readable. –  grifaton Sep 6 '10 at 22:39

11 Answers 11

up vote 18 down vote accepted

After a bit of work, I found the answer myself. Looking at the ElementTree.py source code, I found there was special handling of XML comments and preprocessing instructions. What they do is create a factory function for the special element type that uses a special (non-string) tag value to differentiate it from regular elements.

def Comment(text=None):
    element = Element(Comment)
    element.text = text
    return element

Then in the _write function of ElementTree that actually outputs the XML, there's a special case handling for comments:

if tag is Comment:
    file.write("<!-- %s -->" % _escape_cdata(node.text, encoding))

In order to support CDATA sections, I create a factory function called CDATA, extended the ElementTree class and changed the _write function to handle the CDATA elements.

This still doesn't help if you want to parse an XML with CDATA sections and then output it again with the CDATA sections, but it at least allows you to create XMLs with CDATA sections programmatically, which is what I needed to do.

The implementation seems to work with both ElementTree and cElementTree.

import elementtree.ElementTree as etree
#~ import cElementTree as etree

def CDATA(text=None):
    element = etree.Element(CDATA)
    element.text = text
    return element

class ElementTreeCDATA(etree.ElementTree):
    def _write(self, file, node, encoding, namespaces):
        if node.tag is CDATA:
            text = node.text.encode(encoding)
            file.write("\n<![CDATA[%s]]>\n" % text)
        else:
            etree.ElementTree._write(self, file, node, encoding, namespaces)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    import sys

    text = """
    <?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8'?>
    <text>
    This is just some sample text.
    </text>
    """

    e = etree.Element("data")
    cdata = CDATA(text)
    e.append(cdata)
    et = ElementTreeCDATA(e)
    et.write(sys.stdout, "utf-8")
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1  
This does not seem possible anymore since the _write method is not there, and the _serialize_* functions are static –  Treviño Dec 30 '12 at 15:05
    
What should I do since I can't use _write? So that means I can't use xml.elementtree? This is terrible. –  elwc Jan 2 '13 at 6:17
2  
Thsio reciep won't work for Python 2.7 or 3.2 (and 3.3) - check @amaury's answer bellow. BAsically, teh new ElementTree does not have a "_write" method that can be overriden anymore. –  jsbueno Jan 23 '13 at 17:00

Here is a variant of gooli's solution that works for python 3.2:

import xml.etree.ElementTree as etree

def CDATA(text=None):
    element = etree.Element('![CDATA[')
    element.text = text
    return element

etree._original_serialize_xml = etree._serialize_xml
def _serialize_xml(write, elem, qnames, namespaces):
    if elem.tag == '![CDATA[':
        write("\n<%s%s]]>\n" % (
                elem.tag, elem.text))
        return
    return etree._original_serialize_xml(
        write, elem, qnames, namespaces)
etree._serialize_xml = etree._serialize['xml'] = _serialize_xml


if __name__ == "__main__":
    import sys

    text = """
    <?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8'?>
    <text>
    This is just some sample text.
    </text>
    """

    e = etree.Element("data")
    cdata = CDATA(text)
    e.append(cdata)
    et = etree.ElementTree(e)
    et.write(sys.stdout.buffer.raw, "utf-8")
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This shoudl work fro Python 2.7 as well - as the original recipe does not. I jsut came up with another thing that is mode complicated than this. –  jsbueno Jan 23 '13 at 16:59
    
This needs updating to add the coding kwarg to the _serialize_xml def –  Patrick Sep 28 at 17:58

It's not possible AFAIK... which is a pity. Basically, ElementTree modules assume that the reader is 100% XML compliant, so it shouldn't matter if they output a section as CDATA or some other format that generates the equivalent text.

See this thread on the Python mailing list for more info. Basically, they recommend some kind of DOM-based XML library instead.

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2  
I would not call it "a pity". For the XML infoset (the content), there is no difference between "<![CDATA[ & ]]>" and "&amp;"... Most XML parsers won't even let you know what was in the original document. –  bortzmeyer Oct 15 '08 at 12:13
1  
That's true, but some data can be dumped and parsed much more efficiently in CDATA format. So it's a pain to not be able to tell an XML library to handle it in this way. –  Dan Lenski Oct 15 '08 at 21:02

Actually this code has a bug, since you don't catch ]]> appearing in the data you are inserting as CDATA

as per Is there a way to escape a CDATA end token in xml?

you should break it into two CDATA's in that case, splitting the ]]> between the two.

basically data = data.replace("]]>", "]]]]><![CDATA[>")
(not necessarily correct, please verify)

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lxml has support for CDATA and API like ElementTree.

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This ended up working for me in Python 2.7. Similar to Amaury's answer.

import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET

def CDATA(text=None):
    element = ET.Element('![CDATA[')
    element.text = text
    return element

ET._original_serialize_xml = ET._serialize_xml


def _serialize_xml(write, elem, encoding, qnames, namespaces):
    if elem.tag == '![CDATA[':
        write("<%s%s]]>%s" % (elem.tag, elem.text, elem.tail))
        return
    return ET._original_serialize_xml(
         write, elem, encoding, qnames, namespaces)
ET._serialize_xml = ET._serialize['xml'] = _serialize_xml
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The DOM has (atleast in level 2) an interface DATASection, and an operation Document::createCDATASection. They are extension interfaces, supported only if an implementation supports the "xml" feature.

from xml.dom import minidom

my_xmldoc=minidom.parse(xmlfile)

my_xmldoc.createCDATASection(data)

now u have cadata node add it wherever u want....

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The accepted solution cannot work with Python 2.7. However, there is another package called lxml which (though slightly slower) shared a largely identical syntax with the xml.etree.ElementTree. lxml is able to both write and parse CDATA. Documentation here

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Here's my version which is based on both gooli's and amaury's answers above. It works for both ElementTree 1.2.6 and 1.3.0, which use very different methods of doing this.

Note that gooli's does not work with 1.3.0, which seems to be the current standard in Python 2.7.x.

Also note that this version does not use the CDATA() method gooli used either.

import xml.etree.cElementTree as ET

class ElementTreeCDATA(ET.ElementTree):
    """Subclass of ElementTree which handles CDATA blocks reasonably"""

    def _write(self, file, node, encoding, namespaces):
        """This method is for ElementTree <= 1.2.6"""

        if node.tag == '![CDATA[':
            text = node.text.encode(encoding)
            file.write("\n<![CDATA[%s]]>\n" % text)
        else:
            ET.ElementTree._write(self, file, node, encoding, namespaces)

    def _serialize_xml(write, elem, qnames, namespaces):
        """This method is for ElementTree >= 1.3.0"""

        if elem.tag == '![CDATA[':
            write("\n<![CDATA[%s]]>\n" % elem.text)
        else:
            ET._serialize_xml(write, elem, qnames, namespaces)
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I got here looking for a way to "parse an XML with CDATA sections and then output it again with the CDATA sections".

I was able to do this (maybe lxml has been updated since this post?) with the following: (it is a little rough - sorry ;-). Someone else may have a better way to find the CDATA sections programatically but I was too lazy.

 parser = etree.XMLParser(encoding='utf-8') # my original xml was utf-8 and that was a lot of the problem
 tree = etree.parse(ppath, parser)

 for cdat in tree.findall('./ProjectXMPMetadata'): # the tag where my CDATA lives
   cdat.text = etree.CDATA(cdat.text)

 # other stuff here

 tree.write(opath, encoding="UTF-8",)
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I've discovered a hack to get CDATA to work using comments:

node.append(etree.Comment(' --><![CDATA[' + data.replace(']]>', ']]]]><![CDATA[>') + ']]><!-- '))
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