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I have this code mostly working but I'm having difficultly seeing changes propagate from my User object within controllers.

What I'm trying to do is build a single User service to manage all aspects of the current user on my site. Eg: User.login(), User.logout(), User.currentUser, User.isLoggedIn, etc.

Bear in mind, I'm still relatively new to Angular and ngResource :-).

  • Is there a better / more Angular way to architect this?
  • Are custom properties on a $resource factory even possible?
  • It feels like maybe I need a $rootScope.$apply() or similar in here?

    /**
     * The $resource factory.
     */
    angular.module('myApp.services', ['ngResource'])
      .factory('User', ['$resource', '$http', function($resource, $http) {
        var User,
            anonymousUser,
            currentUser,
            isLoggedIn;
    
        anonymousUser = { uid: 0, pass: null, name: 'Anonymous' };
        currentUser = angular.copy(anonymousUser);
        isLoggedIn = false;
    
        User = $resource('api/user/:verb', {}, {
    
          login: {
            method: 'POST',
            params:  { verb: 'login' },
            isArray: false,
            // (Ab)using the transformResponse callback to update currentUser
            // and isLoggedIn when necessary.
            transformResponse: $http.defaults.transformResponse.concat([
              function (data, headersGetter) {
                if (angular.isObject(data) && angular.isObject(data.user)) {
                  currentUser = data.user;
                  isLoggedIn = true;
                }
                // TODO: Flipping to anonymous user when a login error occurs. Double check if this logic is sound.
                else {
                  currentUser = angular.copy(anonymousUser);
                  isLoggedIn = false;
                }
    
                return data;
              }
            ])
          },
    
          logout: {
            method: 'POST',
            params:  { verb: 'logout' },
            isArray: false, // eg: [true] transformed to { result: true }
            // (Ab)using the transformResponse callback to update currentUser
            // and isLoggedIn when necessary.
            transformResponse: $http.defaults.transformResponse.concat([
              function (data, headersGetter) {
                if (angular.isArray(data) && data.length > 0) {
                  if (data[0] === true) {
                    currentUser = angular.copy(anonymousUser);
                    isLoggedIn = false;
                  }
    
                  return { result: data[0] };
                } else {
                  // TODO: Deal with indeterminate state here. Is the user logged in still or not?
                  // TODO: Return error.
                  return { result: false };
                }
              }
            ])
          }
        });
    
        // FIXME: Adding extra properties onto our $resource here. These ARE visible in the controller but bindings and $watch don't work on them.
        User.isLoggedIn = isLoggedIn;
        User.currentUser = currentUser;
    
        // FIXME: Attempting to bring these objects under the purview of Angular but this isn't helping.
        $rootScope.isLoggedIn = isLoggedIn;
        $rootScope.currentUser = currentUser;
    
        return User;
      }]);
    
    
    /**
     * The controller.
     */
    angular.module('myApp.page', [])
      .controller('NavbarCtrl', ['$scope', 'User', function ($scope, User) {
        // These work, but are not dynamically updated when User.login() and User.logout() are called.
        $scope.currentUser = User.currentUser;
        $scope.isLoggedIn = User.isLoggedIn;
    
        // FIXME: $watch is only called once, changes in User.login() and User.logout() do not invoke $watch here.
        $scope.$watch('currentUser', function (newVal, oldVal) {
          console.log([newVal, oldVal], 'Watching curentUser');
        }, true);
      }])
    
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

It's not angular way. If you want create service - create service, angular have instruments for this, you can read info here about this. Factories should't have logic. So create in your service methods login, logout etc, and with help of $http send request to your server.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @dolgishev I will try that approach. Was hoping to avoid many different by similar objects, eg: User, UserResource, etc. But maybe that is the only way. –  James Andres Jul 5 '13 at 14:05
    
You can create variable in your service, which be a resource, and add methods to service like save, query etc. –  dolgishev Jul 6 '13 at 9:46

Maybe you can try to use prototypes for this. But still I don't know is this a real angular way

.factory('User', ['$resource', ($resource) ->
  user = $resource API_PATH + "/user", {},
    update: {method: 'PUT'}
  user.prototype.login = ->
    blah_blah()

  user.prototype.logout = ->
    blah_blah()

  user

And then use it like:

user = new User() user.login();

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @SET. This does not seem like the Angular way, I agree. Going to take dolgishev's approach with the service rather than factory. –  James Andres Jul 5 '13 at 14:07

Is there a better / more Angular way to architect this?

This is entirely opinion. I would think that if you create this to allow the components to be readable and reusable, then that IS the "angular" way. I have a similar setup, but I separate the "isLoggedIn" into a separate factory. (I'll illustrate this below).

Are custom properties on a $resource factory even possible?

Not sure what you mean. But if you mean creating your own methods like $login(), then the answer is YES.

It feels like maybe I need a $rootScope.$apply() or similar in here?

You can use a callback set the $scope variables. My method uses an instance of the $resource object, so it may be a bit different than yours:

Separate the user into a different service:

.factory('UserSession', function(){
    var user = {
        "name": '',
        "isLoggedIn": false
    };

    return user
});

JUST MY OPINION simplify the $resource factory:

.factory('User', ['$resource', '$http', function($resource, $http) {
    return $resource('api/user/:verb', {}, {

        login: {
          method: 'POST',
          params:  { verb: 'login' },
          isArray: false

        },
        logout: {//}

    });
}]);

And in the controller, inject 'User' and 'UserSession', and add a callback to the $resource instance:

.controller('whatever', ['$scope', 'User', 'UserSession', function($scope, user, sess){
    var logged = sess.isLoggedIn;
    if (!logged){
        var u = new user();
        u.$login({},function(data){ // I forgot the "$" originally - oops.
            $scope.currentUser = data.user.name; // whatever the object looks like;
            sess.isLoggedIn = true;
            sess.name = data.user.name; 
            // now UserSession can be used in other parts of the app
            // may need $scope.$broadcast if other controllers are currently using this data
        }
    }
}])  

Again, this is all just opinion. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @rGil. Yeah, the approach you have outlined is the way I was implementing this originally. Since then I have been trying to move most of the logic and objects into services, to reduce code duplication. Things like 'isLoggedIn' and 'currentUser' are needed all throughout the app so they should be global in some way. From everything I've read a service is the correct way to implement a global. A factory is just a type of service, see: gist.github.com/Mithrandir0x/3639232 –  James Andres Jul 5 '13 at 14:57

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