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I am doing this:

$("td.myTD").each( function(){
    var rowspan = $(this).attr("rowspan");
    rowspan = parseInt(rowspan) + 1;
    $(this).attr("rowspan", rowspan);                            
});

(incrementing by one the rowspan for all the td with class myTD). Is there a shorter way of writing it?

In a perfect world I would like to write soemething like this:

$("td.myTD").attr("rowspan", someMagicHereToGetTheAttrValueForEachFoundElement() + 1);

Is it possible?

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The .attr() method does support a way to do what you are asking, as shown in the answers below, but note that even if it didn't you could shorten the code by eliminating the rowspan variable and using the unary plus operator instead of parseInt(): $(this).attr("rowspan", +$(this).attr("rowspan") + 1) - of course, you'd still need the .each() that way. –  nnnnnn Jul 5 '13 at 13:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

.attr() can take a function that returns the new value from the old one:

$("td.myTD").attr("rowspan", function(i, old) { return +old+1 });

DOCUMENTATION

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Note that it'll need to be return +old + 1 to convert old to a number before doing the addition. (Or you could use parseInt() like in the question, but the OP did ask for the shortest.) –  nnnnnn Jul 5 '13 at 13:46
    
@nnnnnn Thanks. Went with +old to distinguish my answer from Palash's. –  Barmar Jul 5 '13 at 13:47
    
Palash's answer was of course correct too, but I voted for yours on the basis that you gave a bit of explanation as to why the code would work. –  nnnnnn Jul 5 '13 at 13:50

You can do this using the .attr( attributeName, function(index, attr) ):

$("td.myTD").attr("rowspan", function(index, attr){
    return parseInt(attr, 10) + 1;
});

Here, the above code uses a function which takes the index position of the element in the set and the old attribute value as arguments. And then the function returns a new attribute value based on the old attribute. This use of a function to compute attribute values is particularly useful when modifying the attributes of multiple elements at once.

For more information, see the attr function(index, attr) documentation.

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1  
i guess this is the best answer –  Gustonez Jul 5 '13 at 14:07

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