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i have the following situation. the following program although it compiles just fine when i run it, it stops working. can anyone please help me to find the problem? i think i'm using the wrong pointer into the function but i don't know how to fix it and make it work

#include <fstream>
//some other includes
using namespace std;

struct Book{
    string id;
    string title;
    string authorName;
    string authorSurname;
    };

int load(Book* booksInfo)
{
int count = 0;
ifstream fin;
fin.open("myfile.txt");

if (!fin.is_open())
{
    cout << "Unable to open myfile.txt file\n";
    exit(1);
}

while (fin.good())
{   
    getline(fin, booksInfo[count].id, '#'); 
    getline(fin, booksInfo[count].title, '#'); 
    getline(fin, booksInfo[count].authorName, '#'); 
    getline(fin, booksInfo[count].authorSurname, '#'); 

    count++;
} //end while

fin.close(); 

return 0;
} //end load()

//some other functions here

int main()
{
Book * bookInfo;
bookInfo = (Book*) malloc(sizeof(Book)*100);

//some code here

load(bookInfo);

    //some code here

return 0;
} //end main            
share|improve this question
3  
What does "stops working" mean? –  Code-Apprentice Jul 5 '13 at 14:57
3  
In C++ it is preferred (in some cases necessary) to use new instead of malloc. Also you may want to look into STL containers (most notably std::vector) –  Borgleader Jul 5 '13 at 14:57
1  
Why malloc? Don't use malloc. Use new. –  Daniel Daranas Jul 5 '13 at 14:58
5  
Why new? Don't use new. Use std::vector. –  Mr. kbok Jul 5 '13 at 14:59
    
i'm using visual studio 2010 and when i run my program a window comes out which it sais: –  Panagiotis Jul 5 '13 at 15:02

4 Answers 4

Use std::vector to store your list of books:

#include <fstream>
#include <vector>
//some other includes
using namespace std;

struct Book{
    string id;
    string title;
    string authorName;
    string authorSurname;
    };

vector<Book> load()
{
    ifstream fin;
    Book book;
    vector<Book> books;
    fin.open("myfile.txt");

    if (!fin.is_open())
    {
        cout << "Unable to open myfile.txt file\n";
        return books;
    }

    while (fin.good())
    {   
        getline(fin, book.id, '#'); 
        getline(fin, book.title, '#'); 
        getline(fin, book.authorName, '#'); 
        getline(fin, book.authorSurname, '#'); 
        books.push_back(book);
    } //end while

    fin.close(); 

    return books;
} //end load()

//some other functions here

int main()
{
    vector<Book> books = load();
    return 0;
} //end main 
share|improve this answer

It is UB to use malloc to allocate non POD types, in your case book instances will contain some garbage in strings, because there was no std::string constructor called. And it won't be just garbage strings, it will be most likely garbage pointer pointing to some random locations.
You should use std::vector or at least new if you really need to allocate memory manually, to create new Book instances in a heap.
And if you really, really must use malloc, you can use placement new to create valid std::strings in raw memory you have allocated somehow (by malloc in your case).

share|improve this answer
    
If they must malloc they can use Placement New to initialize –  Mgetz Jul 5 '13 at 15:02
    
@Mgetz I bet this is not the case, but adding a note on that. –  alexrider Jul 5 '13 at 15:03

You need to use

Book* bookInfo = new Book[100];

instead. This is because, in C++, a struct is an object (just like a class), and calling malloc on anything other than plain old data is undefined behaviour.

Remember to free your memory using delete[] bookInfo; (note carefully the square brackets). If you use delete on it's own, that's a little more undefined behaviour.

Also make sure that you don't read more than 100 lines; or you'll overflow the array: yet more undefined behaviour.

Finally, consider using a standard template library container like std::vector.

share|improve this answer
    
thanx for your point! i wonder, if i use "new" instead of malloc what can use instead of realloc?? –  Panagiotis Jul 5 '13 at 15:09
1  
@Panagiotis, Technically placement new, but seriously, use a vector. –  chris Jul 5 '13 at 15:13

What about:

Book bookInfo[100];

This avoids heap allocation altogether and should serve your purposes.

share|improve this answer
    
no that won't do, i need to dynamically bind and free memory –  Panagiotis Jul 5 '13 at 15:13

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