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This method should return the index of the first string that starts with the target.

Return -1 if no string starts with the target.

My implementations works but not covers all variations.

Code:

public int getIndex(ArrayList<String> text, String target)
    {
        int i = 0;
        int index = -1;
        boolean found = false;

        while (!found && i < text.size()) //supply condition
        {           
            for (String s : text) {
                if (s.contains(target)) {                    
                    found = true;
                } else {
                    i++;
                }

                if (found) index = i;
            }  
        }

        return index;
    }

testing part:

public static void main(String[] args)
   {
       ArrayList<String> cities = new ArrayList<String>();
       cities.add("Chicago");
       cities.add("Houston");
       cities.add("San Jose");
       cities.add("Seattle");  
       cities.add("Denver");     

       Finder finder = new Finder();

       System.out.println(finder.getIndex(cities, "C"));
       System.out.println("Expected: 0");

       System.out.println(finder.getIndex(cities, "S"));
       System.out.println("Expected: 2");

       System.out.println(finder.getIndex(cities, "D"));
       System.out.println("Expected: 4");

       System.out.println(finder.getIndex(cities, "X"));
       System.out.println("Expected: -1");
   }

This code has coverage 50/50 input:

  4
- Expected: 0
  3
- Expected: 2
  4
+ Expected: 4
  -1
+ Expected: -1

How to solve this issue?

share|improve this question
    
Now I understand that easily this is: throw for-each loop, and change if to if (text.get(i).startsWith(target)) –  nazar_art Jul 6 '13 at 5:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You claim:

My implementations works

It doesn't look like it to me, based on the tests. Your code is much more complicated than it needs to be, which is making it hard to find the bug. The problem is that you've got two loops for no reason:

while (!found && i < text.size()) //supply condition
{           
    for (String s : text) {
    }
}

Why have you got both of those loops? You're incrementing i multiple times within the inner loop...

You'd probably find it easier to get all the tests to pass if you simplify it:

public int getIndex(List<String> text, String target) {
    for (int i = 0; i < text.size(); i++) {
        if (text.get(i).startsWith(target)) {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

This is one of those cases where a dogmatic insistence on only having one return statement per method leads to much messier code.

Note that I've changed the condition from contains (in your code) to startsWith to match the description. You should add a test for this difference - try to find a string which is present in one of the cities, but the city doesn't start with that value.

I've also changed the parameter type to List<String> as you don't really need it to be an ArrayList<String>. (With a bit of work you could make it accept Iterable<String> instead, but that would be more complicated.)

I'd also recommend that you start using JUnit or something similar for your testing, rather than just using System.out.println.

EDIT: Just for a bit of fun, a version which takes Iterable<String> and uses that to handle even LinkedList<String> efficiently:

public int getIndex(Iterable<String> elements, String target) {
    int index = 0;
    for (String element : elements) {
        if (element.startsWith(target)) {
            return index;
        }
        index++;
    }
    return -1;
}

(Not that much harder after all...)

share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't really recommend List for the function as is - LinkedList#get, for example, is not O(1), so it could become a bit of a bottleneck. –  Dukeling Jul 5 '13 at 15:56
    
@Dukeling: It would still work correctly, but wouldn't be terribly efficient. I think that's probably okay - it's more of a design flaw in the collections library than anything else IMO. List becomes pretty useless if you can't treat get as being reasonably efficient. –  Jon Skeet Jul 5 '13 at 16:00
    
@Dukeling: But your comment provoked me to add the more efficient and general version at the bottom :) –  Jon Skeet Jul 5 '13 at 16:04
    
For interest sake, using only a single return statement isn't really much messier, it adds one line and an extra condition (not that I'm particularly for it). –  Dukeling Jul 5 '13 at 16:07
    
@Dukeling: It's not much messier - but when the benefit of single-return is meant to be that it's clearer, I still think this is a good example of the opposite :) –  Jon Skeet Jul 5 '13 at 16:08
public int getIndex(ArrayList<String> text, String target)
    {

        for(int i=0;i < text.size();i++) 
        {           
           if(text.get(i).indexOf(target) == 0)
                return i;
        }

        return -1;
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
or you can use text.get(i).startsWith(target) instead of text.get(i).indexOf(target)==0 –  chetan Jul 5 '13 at 15:22

Making the following changes:

  • Get rid of unnecessary found variable
  • Replace contains with startsWith
  • Remove the for-loop, otherwise you pass through the data a few times
  • Change the while-loop to a for-loop

I get to this, which seems to work:

public int getIndex(ArrayList<String> text, String target)
{
    int index = -1;

    for (int i = 0; index == -1 && i < text.size(); i++)
    {
       if (text.get(i).startsWith(target))
       {
           index = i;
       }
    }

    return index;
}

You can of course improve on it a lot more still.

share|improve this answer

Change the getIndex method with this:

public int getIndex(ArrayList<String> text, String target)
{
    int i = 0;         

    for (String s : text) {
        // Use startsWith if you want to check if the string starts with target...
        // Use contains if you want to check if contains target... 
        if (s.startsWith(target)) {
            return i;
         }

        i++;
    }  

    return -1;
}
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