Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was just reading a blog article and noticed that the author used tap in a snippet something like:

user = User.new.tap do |u|
  u.username = "foobar"
  u.save!
end

My question is what exactly is the benefit or advantage of using tap? Couldn't I just do:

user = User.new
user.username = "foobar"
user.save!

or better yet:

user = User.create! username: "foobar"
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

When readers encounter:

user = User.new
user.username = "foobar"
user.save!

they would have to follow all the three lines and then recognize that is is just creating an instance named user.

If it were:

user = User.new.tap do |u|
  u.username = "foobar"
  u.save!
end

then that would be immediately clear. A reader would not have to read what is inside the block to know that an instance user is created.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think I see what you mean, so the tap just allows you to contain all the code in a neat block? –  Matt Jul 5 '13 at 17:19
2  
@Matt: And also, discard any variable definitions made in the process once the block has done its job. And should there be just one method called on the object, you can write User.new.tap &:foobar –  Boris Stitnicky Jul 5 '13 at 17:21

You can make your codes more modular using tap, and can achieve a better management of local variables. For example, in the following code, you don't need to assign a local variable to the newly created object, in the scope of the method. Note that the block variable, u, is scoped within the block. It is actually one of the beauties of ruby code.

def a_method
  ...
  name = "foobar"
  ...
  return User.new.tap do |u|
    u.username = name
    u.save!
  end
end
share|improve this answer

I would say that there is no advantage to using tap. The only potential benefit, as @sawa points out is, and I quote: "A reader would not have to read what is inside the block to know that an instance user is created." However, at that point the argument can be made that if you're doing non-simplistic record creation logic, your intent would be better communicated by extracting that logic into its own method.

I hold to the opinion that tap is an unnecessary burden on the readability of the code, and could be done without, or substituted with a better technique, like Extract Method.

While tap is a convenience method, it's also personal preference. Give tap a try. Then write some code without using tap, see if you like one way over another.

share|improve this answer

Using tap, as the blogger did, is simply a convenience method. It may have been overkill in your example, but in cases where you'd want to do a bunch of things with the user, tap can arguably provide a cleaner looking interface. So, perhaps it may be better in an example as follows:

user = User.new.tap do |u|
  u.build_profile
  u.process_credit_card
  u.ship_out_item
  u.send_email_confirmation
  u.blahblahyougetmypoint
end

Using the above makes it easy to quickly see that all those methods are grouped together in that they all refer to the same object (the user in this example). The alternative would be:

user = User.new
user.build_profile
user.process_credit_card
user.ship_out_item
user.send_email_confirmation
user.blahblahyougetmypoint

Again, this is debatable - but the case can be made that the second version looks a little messier, and takes a little more human parsing to see that all the methods are being called on the same object.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is just a longer example of what the OP already put in his question, you could still do all of the above with user = User.new, user.do_something, user.do_another_thing... could you please expand on why one might do this? –  Matt Jul 5 '13 at 17:15
    
Although the example is essentially the same, when it showing it in longer form, one can see how using tap may be more aesthetically appealing for this case. I'll add an edit to help demonstrate. –  Rebitzele Jul 5 '13 at 17:18
    
I don't see it either. Using tap has never added any benefints in my experience. Creating, and working with, a local user variable is much cleaner, and readable in my opinion. –  gylaz Jul 5 '13 at 17:22

Another case to use tap is to make manipulation on object before returning it.

So instead of this:

def some_method
  ...
  some_object.serialize
  some_object
end

we can save extra line:

def some_method
  ...
  some_object.tap{ |o| o.serialize }
end

In some situation this technique can save more then one line and make code more compact.

share|improve this answer

You're right: the use of tap in your example is kind of pointless and probably less clean than your alternatives.

As Rebitzele notes, tap is just a convenience method, often used to create a shorter reference to the current object.

One good use case for tap is for debugging: you can modify the object, print the current state, then continue modifying the object in the same block. See here for example: http://moonbase.rydia.net/mental/blog/programming/eavesdropping-on-expressions.

I occasionally like to use tap inside methods to conditionally return early while returning the current object otherwise.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.