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Can we use a lambda as a deleter with a std::unique_ptr ? Actualy, I did it with clang++ and it was happy to do so.

I'm using std::swap to swap to std::unique_ptr<ObjType, decltyp(deleter)>; where auto deleter = [](struct addrinfo* ptr){if (ptr != nullptr) {freeaddrinfo(ptr);} };. Clang's swap seems to do not need a copy assignment operator, but gcc's std::swap did, as you can see in those logs :

In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.8.1/memory:81:0,
                 from /home/zenol/proj/src/PROJ/TCPClient.cpp:28:
/usr/include/c++/4.8.1/bits/unique_ptr.h: In instantiation of ‘std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Dp>& std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Dp>::operator=(std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Dp>&&) [with _Tp = addrinfo; _Dp = Proj::TCPClient::connect(const Proj::SocketAddress&, int)::__lambda0]’:
/usr/include/c++/4.8.1/bits/move.h:176:11:   required from ‘void std::swap(_Tp&, _Tp&) [with _Tp = std::unique_ptr<addrinfo, Proj::TCPClient::connect(const Proj::SocketAddress&, int)::__lambda0>]’
/home/zenol/proj/src/Proj/SocketHelp.hpp:109:50:   required from ‘void Proj::retrieve_addresses(std::string, int, addrinfo&, addrinfo*&, T&, U) [with T = std::unique_ptr<addrinfo, Proj::TCPClient::connect(const Proj::SocketAddress&, int)::__lambda0>; U = Proj::TCPClient::connect(const Proj::SocketAddress&, int)::__lambda0; std::string = std::basic_string<char>]’
/home/zenol/proj/src/PROJ/TCPClient.cpp:65:49:   required from here
/usr/include/c++/4.8.1/bits/unique_ptr.h:193:16: erreur: use of deleted function ‘Proj::TCPClient::connect(const Proj::SocketAddress&, int)::__lambda0& Proj::TCPClient::connect(const Proj::SocketAddress&, int)::__lambda0::operator=(const Proj::TCPClient::connect(const Proj::SocketAddress&, int)::__lambda0&)’
  get_deleter() = std::forward<deleter_type>(__u.get_deleter());
                ^
/home/zenol/proj/src/Proj/TCPClient.cpp:56:21: note: a lambda closure type has a deleted copy assignment operator
     auto deleter = [](struct addrinfo* ptr)
                     ^

What says the standard? Can I manage to wap those two std::unique_ptr ? Are they a workaround ? (Maybe encapsulating the lambda inside a std::function? ...)

Edit : Here is a small example that should be more or less the same thing :

auto deleter = [](struct addrinfo* ptr)
{if (ptr != nullptr) {freeaddrinfo(ptr);} };

std::unique_ptr<struct addrinfo, decltype(deleter)>
resources_keeper(nullptr, deleter);

int main()
{
    decltype(resources_keeper) plouf1(nullptr, deleter);
    decltype(resources_keeper) plouf2(nullptr, deleter);

    std::swap(plouf1, plouf2);
    return 0;
}

The error :

In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.8.1/bits/stl_pair.h:59:0,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.8.1/bits/stl_algobase.h:64,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.8.1/memory:62,
                 from mini.cpp:1:
/usr/include/c++/4.8.1/bits/move.h: In instantiation of ‘void std::swap(_Tp&, _Tp&) [with _Tp = __lambda0]’:
/usr/include/c++/4.8.1/tuple:381:36:   required from ‘void std::_Tuple_impl<_Idx, _Head, _Tail ...>::_M_swap(std::_Tuple_impl<_Idx, _Head, _Tail ...>&) [with long unsigned int _Idx = 1ul; _Head = __lambda0; _Tail = {}]’
/usr/include/c++/4.8.1/tuple:382:35:   required from ‘void std::_Tuple_impl<_Idx, _Head, _Tail ...>::_M_swap(std::_Tuple_impl<_Idx, _Head, _Tail ...>&) [with long unsigned int _Idx = 0ul; _Head = addrinfo*; _Tail = {__lambda0}]’
/usr/include/c++/4.8.1/tuple:667:33:   required from ‘void std::tuple<_T1, _T2>::swap(std::tuple<_T1, _T2>&) [with _T1 = addrinfo*; _T2 = __lambda0]’
/usr/include/c++/4.8.1/tuple:1050:7:   required from ‘void std::swap(std::tuple<_Elements ...>&, std::tuple<_Elements ...>&) [with _Elements = {addrinfo*, __lambda0}]’
/usr/include/c++/4.8.1/bits/unique_ptr.h:269:21:   required from ‘void std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Dp>::swap(std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Dp>&) [with _Tp = addrinfo; _Dp = __lambda0]’
/usr/include/c++/4.8.1/bits/unique_ptr.h:484:7:   required from ‘void std::swap(std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Dp>&, std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Dp>&) [with _Tp = addrinfo; _Dp = __lambda0]’
mini.cpp:21:29:   required from here
/usr/include/c++/4.8.1/bits/move.h:176:11: erreur: use of deleted function ‘__lambda0& __lambda0::operator=(const __lambda0&)’
       __a = _GLIBCXX_MOVE(__b);
           ^
mini.cpp:9:17: note: a lambda closure type has a deleted copy assignment operator
 auto deleter = [](struct addrinfo* ptr)
                 ^
In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.8.1/bits/stl_pair.h:59:0,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.8.1/bits/stl_algobase.h:64,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.8.1/memory:62,
                 from mini.cpp:1:
/usr/include/c++/4.8.1/bits/move.h:177:11: erreur: use of deleted function ‘__lambda0& __lambda0::operator=(const __lambda0&)’
       __b = _GLIBCXX_MOVE(__tmp);
           ^
share|improve this question
1  
Can you give a small example of what you want to do? I tried this an didn't get an error: ideone.com/LKXz7z –  Vaughn Cato Jul 5 '13 at 17:14
1  
@VaughnCato: You are not swapping the unique pointers though... –  Andy Prowl Jul 5 '13 at 17:23
    
I've added a short example code to reproduce it (I hop it reproduce the same thing :) ) –  Jeremy Cochoy Jul 5 '13 at 17:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To expand on Jonathan Wakely's answer:

When you swap to unique_ptrs, you also have to swap their deleters. The problem you are seeing boils down to this: clang can swap two lambdas of the same type, gcc cannot (and the standard allows both as Jonathan quotes it). Demonstration:

#include <utility>

int main() {
  auto f = [](){};
  auto g(f);
  std::swap(f, g);
}

This code works with clang but fails to compile with gcc. (And that is OK.)

That is why it is happening.


I suggest the following:

#include <memory>
#include <utility>

struct addrinfo { };

void freeaddrinfo(addrinfo* ) { }

struct deleter {
  void operator()(struct addrinfo* ptr) {
    if (ptr != nullptr)
      freeaddrinfo(ptr);
  }
};

using resources_keeper = std::unique_ptr<struct addrinfo, deleter>;

int main() {

    resources_keeper plouf1(nullptr);
    resources_keeper plouf2(nullptr);

    std::swap(plouf1, plouf2);
    return 0;
}

Note that the code became cleaner and more readable as well.


If you absolutely have to solve this with lambdas, then perhaps you could try something hackish like this: Swap only the pointers but not the deleters.

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <utility>

using namespace std;

template <class T, class D>
void swap_pointers_but_not_deleters(unique_ptr<T,D>& x, unique_ptr<T,D>& y) noexcept {

  T* x_ptr = x.release();

  x.reset(y.release());

  y.reset(x_ptr);
}

int main() {

  auto deleter = [](int* p){ delete p; };

  unique_ptr<int,decltype(deleter)> a(new int(1),deleter);

  unique_ptr<int,decltype(deleter)> b(new int(2),deleter);

  swap_pointers_but_not_deleters(a, b);

  cout << "a = " << *a << ", b = " << *b << endl;
}

Although this code seems to work, I really don't like it. I suggest the first solution that does not use lambdas.

share|improve this answer
    
Swapping "by hand" only pointers is, as you said, the worst solution. I find using lambda "semantically" better, in the sense that it "means" you are building a kind of function, instead of using the keyword "struct" to build a functor (although lambda can (are?) implemented as a particular kind of functors). –  Jeremy Cochoy Jul 6 '13 at 12:21
    
An other solution is to store the lambda inside a std::function. Then, the std::functions are swapable. Like : std::function<void(int*)> deleter = [](int*p){ if (p != nullptr) free(p); }; –  Jeremy Cochoy Jul 6 '13 at 12:55
    
@user2535207 In general I also prefer lambdas to structs. However it is also context dependent which one to use. I use a lambda if I do not plan on re-using it (do not create possibly many instances) and I use a struct if I reuse it. In your case, you are re-using it, so in my opinion the struct is better in your case. But I must emphasize, it is my personal opinion. As for expressing your intentions, I wouldn't worry to much about saying struct when I want a functor: We have been following this approach up until C++11 so it is common knowledge, any (reasonably skilled) developer gets it. –  Ali Jul 6 '13 at 13:13
    
@user2535207 As it turns out, you can do it with lambdas! Please check my new answer. –  Ali Jul 6 '13 at 13:27

This has nothing to do with unique_ptr or tuple, you can reduce the error to this:

int main()
{
  auto deleter = []() { };
  auto del2 = deleter;
  deleter = static_cast<decltype(deleter)>(del2);
}

Which compiles with Clang but fails with G++, giving this error:

t.cc: In function ‘int main()’:
t.cc:5:11: error: use of deleted function ‘main()::<lambda()>& main()::<lambda()>::operator=(const main()::<lambda()>&)’
   deleter = static_cast<decltype(deleter)>(del2);
           ^
t.cc:3:19: note: a lambda closure type has a deleted copy assignment operator
   auto deleter = []() { };
                   ^

The last C++11 standard says in [expr.prim.lambda]/19:

The closure type associated with a lambda-expression has a deleted (8.4.3) default constructor and a deleted copy assignment operator. It has an implicitly-declared copy constructor (12.8) and may have an implicitly-declared move constructor (12.8).

So it is up to the compiler whether the type is move-assignable or not.

share|improve this answer

I can reproduce a similar error with the following code:

struct A
{
    A() = default;
    A(A&&) = default;
    //A & operator=(A&&) = default;
    A(A const & ) = delete;
};

int main()
{
    A a, b;
    std::swap(a,b);
}

Uncomment the move assignment operator and the error goes away. I'm guessing gcc doesn't allow move assignment of lambas (I'm using version 4.7.2). Change the lambda to an actual function or functor and you should be alright.

share|improve this answer
    
Pretty sad. Is it a GCC bug or a 'feature'? (i.e. c++11 says it should be allowed, or doesn't says anything?) –  Jeremy Cochoy Jul 5 '13 at 17:46
    
unfortunately, I don't have access to the standard to determine if there are any such restrictions on lambdas, but I can't think of why such a restriction would be necessary. It's probably just a bug (or incomplete feature) in gcc. –  pelletjl Jul 5 '13 at 18:06
1  
@pelletjl, noone has the excuse "I don't have access to the standard", the current draft is always available on the left sidebar at isocpp.org and the FDIS is almost identical to the standard –  Jonathan Wakely Jul 5 '13 at 22:48
    
Your example also fails with clang 3.4 (trunk 182210). What has this got to do with lambdas? –  Jonathan Wakely Jul 5 '13 at 22:52

As it turns out, you can solve it with lambdas, as long as they can be converted to function pointers (lambdas capturing nothing).

#include <memory>
#include <utility>

struct addrinfo { };

void freeaddrinfo(addrinfo* ) { }

auto deleter = [](struct addrinfo* ptr) {
  if (ptr != nullptr)
    freeaddrinfo(ptr);
};

using resources_keeper = std::unique_ptr<struct addrinfo, void(*)(struct addrinfo*)>;

int main() {

    resources_keeper plouf1(nullptr,deleter);
    resources_keeper plouf2(nullptr,deleter);

    std::swap(plouf1, plouf2);
    return 0;
}

However, I still like my other solution with the struct better. It is likely to be the most efficient one (thanks to inlining), followed by the solution presented here. Passing a heavy-weight std::function looks like an overkill to me if the deleter implementation is really simple. Whether these performance considerations matter, it is the profiler's job to tell.

share|improve this answer
    
Since in my case, there won't be a speed issue, I'll use this solution, which both simplify the deleter type and allow writing deleter while you create the std::unique_ptrs. Thanks :) –  Jeremy Cochoy Jul 6 '13 at 14:18
    
@user2535207 I am glad we have managed to find a solution you like! :) –  Ali Jul 6 '13 at 16:50

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