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I started learning MongoDB 3 days ago and while doing an exercise I got some unexpected behavior from the server.

The exercise asked to write a small program to remove the lowest homework score from a document that have the following structure (this document is inside the students collection):

{
    "_id": 10,
    "name": "Demarcus Audette",
    "scores": [
        {
            "type": "exam"
            "score": 47.42086

        },
        {
            "type": "quiz"
            "score": 44.83456

        },{
            "type": "homework"
            "score": 39.0178956

        },{
            "type": "homework"
            "score": 14.578344

        }
    ]
}

Anyway, while writing the program I accidentally made a mistake. Here is the program I wrote

def removeHW(hw):
    # establish a connection to the database
    connection = MongoClient("localhost", 27017)

    # get a handle to the school database
    db = connection.school
    students = db.students

    # extract the scores into a list
    scores = []
    for i in range(1, len(hw)):
        scores.append(hw[i]["score"])

    # Now remove the lowest score from the database
    query = {"_id": hw[0], "scores.score": min(scores),"scores.type": "homework"}

    try:
        students.remove(query)
    except: 
        print "Unexpected error:", sys.exc_info()[0]

The logic behind my program is that after I extract a list of dictionaries containing the two homeworks and the _id from the students collection, I iterate over every dictionary and pass it to the removeHW() function.

The mistake I made is that I wrote:

query = {"_id": hw[0], "scores.score": min(scores),"scores.type": "homework"}
students.remove(query)

When I should have written the following (Which is the correct solution):

query = {"_id": hw[0], "scores.type": "homework"}
students.update(query, {"$pull": {"scores": {"score" : min(scores)}}})

Yes, I know until now it seems that everything is ok and it is. The problem I encountered is that when using the first solution (the wrong one) MongoDB removed all the documents from the students collection and created a new collection scores containing all the subdocuments from the students collection except the one I wanted to remove (the homework with the lowest grade). I found this behavior extremely weird, and since I have no prior experience with NoSQL databases I wanna know what caused MongoDB to do that and why.

If anyone can help me understand, please do. I'll be eternally grateful to you.

share|improve this question
    
"Eternally grateful?" :) That's a very long time. Are you certain that all documents were removed? (How many were there in the students collection)? The _id should have limited it to one document. And, given that there's no insert/update in the code you provided, I don't see how it would have done what you said. –  WiredPrairie Jul 5 '13 at 18:42
    
yes I'm sure, there were 200 docs in the students collection, the structure of the scores collection that mongo created is as follows: {{"_id": 10, "name": "Demarcus Audette", "type":"exam", "score": 44.654}, {"_id": 10, "name": "Demarcus Audette", "type":"homework", score: 45.456}, ...}, I'm telling you it's the strangest thing I have ever seen –  Oussama Bouguerne Jul 5 '13 at 18:49
    
what is the structure of hw that you pass to removeHW? –  innoSPG Jul 5 '13 at 20:22
    
@innoSPG: The structure {_id, {"type":"homework", "score":score of the first homework }, {"type":"homework", "score":score of the second homework }} –  Oussama Bouguerne Jul 5 '13 at 21:20
    
_ids must be unique in MongoDB, so by passing an _id, only one document could have been removed. Further, there's not any code, as I said which appears to create anything. There must be another explanation. –  WiredPrairie Jul 5 '13 at 22:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The behaviour is perfectly normal since all the data for a given student are stored in the same document. What is happening is that: each document of your collection has a min score for the evaluation of type homework. So each document matches the criteria and is delete.

In the second option, you take the precaution of pulling one score. But still, you can not be sure to always succeed. Let say that a quiz or an exam has a score equal to the min of the homework scores. You can also pull that one. In addition to check that you pull the evaluation with min score, you should also check that the evaluation you are pulling is of type homework.

The part of your query ("scores.type": "homework") is only making sure that you update only student that have a least one score in homework. If there is a student with no homework, you may have a problem with min; I am not familiar with python.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, but I should point out that the min function is only comparing the homeworks scores since hw (which is a list) only contains the _id of the student and two dictionaries (which I pulled out earlier ) containing the students homeworks scores. –  Oussama Bouguerne Jul 6 '13 at 0:32
    
You are welcome. For the other point, you are calculating the min perfectly. But since all the scores are in the same array, the min of homework can mach the score of quiz or exam. in that case, you will pull them all. Try by adding a doc that has the same score for everything. –  innoSPG Jul 6 '13 at 0:58
    
Ok I see what you mean and I think you're right. Thanks again. –  Oussama Bouguerne Jul 6 '13 at 15:21

MongoDB will not create a "scores" collection in response to a remove or update operation. Especially, updating or removing from the "students" collection won't create a "scores" collection.

MongoDB creates a collection when you insert into that collection, or upsert into the collection, or explicitly call create_collection.

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