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I am currently playing around with the idea of an application for android which involves encryption. I am planning to use aes in ctr mode and PBKDF2 with whirlpool for key stretching.

I am going to implement a new bouncy castle implementation instead of androids built in old implementation. To make sure it works as intended on any android version.

But I am having some problem figuring out a solid way to generate random numbers for salt and key. I have read somewhere that the built in secure random in android is insecure in some old android versions and I have also heard that most android phones have a hard time keeping a high entropy in dev/random and blocks often. Shouldn’t that have a huge impact on the security of dev/urandom? I am therefore looking for good ways to use the sensors on the phone to gather more entropy.

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Using sensors is expensive (if I recall correctly) and out of the way. You are better off making your own random number generator that stays away from using the phone's sensors. There are a lot of statistical algorithms that can help you for making one. –  CyberneticTwerkGuruOrc Jul 5 '13 at 18:19
    
Interesting blog post on the subject: blog.cryptographyengineering.com/2012/03/surviving-bad-rng.html –  ntoskrnl Jul 5 '13 at 18:21
    
Sorry. I wasn't sure what level of skills you had. I actually implemented a simplified-DES before, so I just assume others have done something similar... If you are new, I would recommend just creating the project you want to with the Java random number gen for now. Once that's working, you should try to improve (and experiment) your random number gen. –  CyberneticTwerkGuruOrc Jul 5 '13 at 18:35
1  
@Mohammad what do you mean with sensors are expensive? –  Hampus Andersson Jul 5 '13 at 19:47
    
Expensive in the sense that it costs a lot of memory and power to use it. Parsing Strings is expensive in Android phone apps as well. This expense can slow down the app significantly. Also, this is design related, but what if someone's phone has broken sensors? What do you do in that case? –  CyberneticTwerkGuruOrc Jul 5 '13 at 19:58

1 Answer 1

The following classes should help you alleviate issues with the Android SecureRandom class. This code was created instead of a text because otherwise the small details.

/**
 * A strengthener that can be used to generate and re-seed random number
 * generators that do not seed themselves appropriately.
 * 
 * @author owlstead
 */
public class SecureRandomStrengthener {
    private static final String DEFAULT_PSEUDO_RANDOM_NUMBER_GENERATOR = "SHA1PRNG";

    private static final EntropySource TIME_ENTROPY_SOURCE = new EntropySource() {

        final ByteBuffer timeBuffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(Long.SIZE / Byte.SIZE
                * 2);

        @Override
        public ByteBuffer provideEntropy() {
            this.timeBuffer.clear();
            this.timeBuffer.putLong(System.currentTimeMillis());
            this.timeBuffer.putLong(System.nanoTime());
            this.timeBuffer.flip();
            return this.timeBuffer;
        }
    };

    private final String algorithm;
    private final List<EntropySource> entropySources = new LinkedList<EntropySource>();
    private final MessageDigest digest;
    private final ByteBuffer seedBuffer;

    /**
     * Generates an instance of a {@link SecureRandomStrengthener} that
     * generates and re-seeds instances of {@code "SHA1PRNG"}.
     * 
     * @return the strengthener, never null
     */
    public static SecureRandomStrengthener getInstance() {
        return new SecureRandomStrengthener(
                DEFAULT_PSEUDO_RANDOM_NUMBER_GENERATOR);
    }

    /**
     * Generates an instance of a {@link SecureRandomStrengthener} that
     * generates instances of the given argument. Note that the availability of
     * the given algorithm arguments in not tested until generation.
     * 
     * @param algorithm
     *            the algorithm indicating the {@link SecureRandom} instance to
     *            use
     * @return the strengthener, never null
     */
    public static SecureRandomStrengthener getInstance(final String algorithm) {
        return new SecureRandomStrengthener(algorithm);
    }

    private SecureRandomStrengthener(final String algorithm) {
        if (algorithm == null || algorithm.length() == 0) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(
                    "Please provide a PRNG algorithm string such as SHA1PRNG");
        }

        this.algorithm = algorithm;
        try {
            this.digest = MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA1");
        } catch (final NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
            throw new IllegalStateException(
                    "MessageDigest to create seed not available", e);
        }
        this.seedBuffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(this.digest.getDigestLength());
    }

    /**
     * Add an entropy source, which will be called for each generation and
     * re-seeding of the given random number generator.
     * 
     * @param source
     *            the source of entropy
     */
    public void addEntropySource(final EntropySource source) {
        if (source == null) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(
                    "EntropySource should not be null");
        }
        this.entropySources.add(source);
    }

    /**
     * Generates and seeds a random number generator of the configured
     * algorithm. Calls the {@link EntropySource#provideEntropy()} method of all
     * added sources of entropy.
     * 
     * @return the random number generator
     */
    public SecureRandom generateAndSeedRandomNumberGenerator() {
        final SecureRandom secureRandom;
        try {
            secureRandom = SecureRandom.getInstance(this.algorithm);
        } catch (final NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("PRNG is not available", e);
        }

        reseed(secureRandom);
        return secureRandom;
    }

    /**
     * Re-seeds the random number generator. Calls the
     * {@link EntropySource#provideEntropy()} method of all added sources of
     * entropy.
     * 
     * @param secureRandom
     *            the random number generator to re-seed
     */
    public void reseed(final SecureRandom secureRandom) {
        this.seedBuffer.clear();
        secureRandom.nextBytes(this.seedBuffer.array());

        for (final EntropySource source : this.entropySources) {
            final ByteBuffer entropy = source.provideEntropy();
            if (entropy == null) {
                continue;
            }

            final ByteBuffer wipeBuffer = entropy.duplicate();
            this.digest.update(entropy);
            wipe(wipeBuffer);
        }

        this.digest.update(TIME_ENTROPY_SOURCE.provideEntropy());
        this.digest.update(this.seedBuffer);
        this.seedBuffer.clear();
        // remove data from seedBuffer so it won't be retrievable

        // reuse

        try {
            this.digest.digest(this.seedBuffer.array(), 0,
                    this.seedBuffer.capacity());
        } catch (final DigestException e) {
            throw new IllegalStateException(
                    "DigestException should not be thrown", e);
        }
        secureRandom.setSeed(this.seedBuffer.array());

        wipe(this.seedBuffer);
    }

    private void wipe(final ByteBuffer buf) {
        while (buf.hasRemaining()) {
            buf.put((byte) 0);
        }
    }
}

And this is the small interface that is EntropySource:

/**
 * A simple interface that can be used to retrieve entropy from any source.
 * 
 * @author owlstead
 */
public interface EntropySource {
    /**
     * Retrieves the entropy.
     * The position of the ByteBuffer must be advanced to the limit by any users calling this method.
     * The values of the bytes between the position and limit should be set to zero by any users calling this method.
     * 
     * @return entropy within the position and limit of the given buffer
     */
    ByteBuffer provideEntropy();
}

Note that the output of the classes has not been tested for randomness (but this relies mainly on the returned SecureRandom class and should therefore be fine).

Finally, as I don't have the Android 1.6 runtime ready, somebody should test it against this or a lower version for compatibility (!).

share|improve this answer
    
Beware to flip() your ByteBuffers after putting entropy in them. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 6 '13 at 22:08
    
Anything missing from my answer, Hampus? –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 12 '13 at 13:35
    
Google's CSPRNG patch throws out SHA1PRNG in favour of reading directly from /dev/urandom on all Android versions, except 4.2/4.3 which already did so (but messed up the initial seed). They use some more entropy sources than just time. Unfortunately, they're seeding by writing to /dev/urandom and this fails on some CyanogenMod and the latest Galaxy S4 firmware, because they deny the writes. Between your code and /dev/urandom, which gets reseeded over time by the kernel, I don't know what to use anymore. –  Barend Sep 15 '13 at 11:08

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