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Given a data.table, I would like to subset the items in there quickly. For example:

dt = data.table(a=1:10, key="a")
dt[a > 3 & a <= 7]

This is pretty slow still. I know I can do joins to get individual rows but is there a way to fact that the data.table is sorted to get quick subsets of this kind?

This is what I'm doing:

dt1 = data.table(id = 1, ym = c(199001, 199006, 199009, 199012), last_ym = c(NA, 199001, 199006, 199009), v = 1:4, key=c("id", "ym"))
dt2 = data.table(id = 1, ym = c(199001, 199002, 199003, 199004, 199005, 199006, 199007, 199008, 199009, 199010, 199011, 199012), v2 = 1:12, key=c("id","ym"))

For each id, here there is only 1, and ym in dt1, I would like to sum the values of v2 between current ym in dt1 and the last ym in dt1. That is, for ym == 199006 in dt1 I would like to return list(v2 = 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6). These are the values of v2 in dt2 that are equal to or less than the current ym (excluding the previous ym). In code:

expr = expression({ #browser();
 cur_id = id; 
 cur_ym = ym; 
 cur_dtb = dt2[J(cur_id)][ym <= cur_ym & ym > last_ym]; 
 setkey(cur_dtb , ym);
 list(r = sum(cur_dtb$v2))
})

dt1[,eval(expr ),by=list(id, ym)]
share|improve this question
3  
I don't see how this is slow at all? It took 0.28 sec using system.time on a data.table of 10 million rows. – Señor O Jul 5 '13 at 18:38
    
yes but if you have to do this 100,000 times, that's slow! i might have to come up with a different alg for what i'm doing. – Alex Jul 5 '13 at 18:48
    
Are you using a for loop? – Señor O Jul 5 '13 at 18:51
1  
no, i'm not. let me put an example up. – Alex Jul 5 '13 at 18:52
    
Your example doesn't run at all for me. :/ – joran Jul 5 '13 at 19:12
up vote 4 down vote accepted

To avoid the logical condition, perform a rolling join of dt1 and dt2. Then shift ym forward by one position within id. Finally, sum over v2 by id and ym:

setkey(dt1, id, last_ym)
setkey(dt2, id, ym)
dt1[dt2,, roll = TRUE][
       , list(v2 = v2, ym = c(last_ym[1], head(ym, -1))), by = id][
       , list(v2 = sum(v2)), by = list(id, ym)]

Note that we want to sum everything since the last_ym so the key on dt1 must be last_ym rather than ym.

The result is:

   id     ym v2
1:  1 199001  1
2:  1 199006 20
3:  1 199009 24
4:  1 199012 33

UPDATE: correction

share|improve this answer
    
sorry, i'm a bit confused by all the setkey expressions.. those don't look correct...? – Alex Jul 5 '13 at 20:14
    
I have fixed them to correspond to what I was actually using and added some explanation. – G. Grothendieck Jul 5 '13 at 20:25

Regardless of the fact that data.table is sorted, you will be limited to the amount of time it takes to evaluate a > 3 & a <= 7 in the first place:

> dt = data.table(a=1:10000000, key="a")
> system.time(dt$a > 3 & dt$a <= 7)
   user  system elapsed 
   0.18    0.01    0.20 
> system.time(dt[,a > 3 & a <= 7])
   user  system elapsed 
   0.18    0.05    0.24 
> system.time(dt[a > 3 & a <= 7])
   user  system elapsed 
   0.25    0.07    0.31

Alternative approach:

> system.time({Indices = dt$a > 3 & dt$a <= 7 ; dt[Indices]})
user  system elapsed 
0.28    0.03    0.31 

Multiple Subsets

There can be a speed issue here if you break up factors on an ad hoc basis rather than doing it all at once first:

> dt <- data.table(A=sample(letters, 10000, replace=T))
> system.time(for(i in unique(dt$A)) dt[A==i])
   user  system elapsed 
   5.16    0.42    5.59 
> system.time(dt[,.SD,by=A])
   user  system elapsed 
   0.32    0.03    0.36
share|improve this answer
    
just posted an example, maybe you can think of a better way to do this – Alex Jul 5 '13 at 19:07

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