Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Imagine an alphabet of words.

Example:

 a ==> 1 
 b ==> 2 
 c ==> 3 

 z ==> 26 
 ab ==> 27 
 ac ==> 28 

 az ==> 51 
 bc ==> 52 
 and so on. 

Such that the sequence of characters need to be in ascending order only (ab is valid but ba is not). Given any word print its index if valid and 0 if not.

 Input  Output 

 ab      27 

 ba       0 

 aez     441 

In this question, I can do math easily but I am not getting any algorithm.

What i did in math is

one letter 26

two letter 325

.

.

.

so on

share|improve this question
    
Create a map of letters and do some addition. –  Hunter McMillen Jul 5 '13 at 18:48
3  
Is it a homework? –  stalin Jul 5 '13 at 19:18
    
    
I don't exactly know what you are talking about. If you are basically asking for base26 encoding, here's your buzzword. You'll find a plethora of information how to do that kind of math. (You might want to search for base16 algorithms (probably more out there), and then proceed in an analogue way.) If not, then what exactly are you trying to calculate? –  Romiox Jul 5 '13 at 19:27
2  
Note that the base for each column appears to change depending on the content of the previous column. For the string bc, the first column is base 26, but the maximum allowed value for the second column is c - since it has to be less than b - making that column base 24 (which gives the otherwise unexpected value of 52). This isn't a simple "convert to base 26" problem. –  Ant Jul 5 '13 at 20:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted
  1. First make all the letters numbers:
    • 'aez' would become 1,5,26
  2. Make these numbers variables called ...X3,X2,X1
    • 26 would be X1, 5 would be X2, 1 would be X3 (note, right to left)

Now for the magic formula:

enter image description here

Coded with examples and demonstration of speed even in worse case scenario:

def comb(n,k): #returns combinations
    p = 1 #product
    for i in range(k):
        p *= (n-i)/(i+1)
    return p

def solve(string):
    x = []
    for letter in string:
        x.append(ord(letter)-96)  #convert string to list of integers
    x = list(reversed(x))  #reverse the order of string
    #Next, the magic formula
    return x[0]+sum(comb(26,i)-comb(26-x[i-1]+1,i)*(1-i/(26-x[i-1]+1)) for i in range(2,len(x)+1))

solve('bhp')
764.0
>>> solve('afkp')
3996.0
>>> solve('abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz')
67108863.0
>>> solve('hpz')
2090.0
>>> solve('aez')
441.0
>>> if 1:
        s = ''
        for a in range(97,97+26):
                s += chr(a)
        t = time.time()
        for v in range(1000):
                temp = solve(s)
        print (time.time()-t)


0.1650087833404541

In order to understand my explanation to this formula, I need to go over a mathematical occurrence in pascal's triangle and the binomial theorem:

Here is pascal's triangle:

enter image description here

Going from top right to bottom left, first there is a sequence of 1s. Then a sequence of the counting numbers. The next sequence is the sum of the counting numbers. These are known as the triangular numbers. The next sequence is the sum of the triangular numbers, known as the tetrahedral numbers and this pattern goes on and on.

Now for the binomial theorem:

enter image description here

By combining the binomial theorem and pascals triangle, it can be seen that the nth triangular number is:

enter image description here

and nth tetrahedral number is:

enter image description here

the sum of the first n tetrahedral numbers is:

enter image description here

and on ...

Now for the explanation. For this explanation, I will only use 6 letters, a-f, and will replace these with the numbers 1-6. The procedure is the same with more letters

If the length is 1, then the possible sequences are:

1
2
3
4
5
6

In this the answer is simply the value

Now for a length of 2:

12  13  14  15  16
23  24  25  26
34  35  36
45  46
56

To solve this we split it into 3 parts:

  1. Find the total number of elements in the rows above
    • In this case, there are 5 elements in the first row, 4 in the second, 3 in the 3rd and so forth. What we have to do is find a way to sum the first n elements of the sequence (5,4,3,2,1). In order to do this, we subtract triangular numbers. (1+2+3+4+5)-(1+2+3) = (4+5). Similarly (1+2+3+4+5)-(1+2) = 3+4+5. Therefore this value is equal to:
      • enter image description here
  2. Now, we have accounted for the values above our target and are only concerned with the column it is in. To find this, we add x1-x2
  3. Lastly, we need to add the amount of length 1 sequences there are. This is equal to 6. Therefore, our formula is:
    • enter image description here

Next we will repeat for sequences of length 3:

123  124  125  126
134  135  136
145  146
156

234  235  236
245  246
256

345  346
356

456

Once again we split this problem into steps:

  1. Find how many elements are above each array. The arrays values are the backwards triangular numbers (10, 6, 3, 1). This time, instead of subtracting triangular numbers we subtract tetrahedral numbers:
    • enter image description here
  2. Notice how each individual array has the shape of a length 2 sequence. By subtracting x3 from x1, and x2, we reduce the sequence to degree 2. For example, we will subtract 2 from the second array

This

234  235  236
245  246
256

becomes

12  13  14
23  24
34  
  1. We can now use the length 2 formula, with 6-x3 instead of 6, because our sequences now have a different maximum value
    • enter image description here
  2. Lastly, we add the total number of length 1 and length 2 sequences. It turns out there is a pattern for how many sequences of a particular length there are. The answer is combinations. There are enter image description here sequences of length 1, enter image description here of length 2, and so on.

Combining these our total formula for length 3 becomes:

enter image description here

We can follow this pattern of reduction for higher length sequences

Now we will right out our formulas to look for patterns:

Length 1: y1

Length 2:

Length 3:

enter image description here

Note: I also used length 4 to make sure the patterns held

With a bit of math, grouping of terms, and the change from 6 to 26 our formula becomes:

In order to simplify this further, more math must be done.
This identity holds true for all a and b. For a quick fun exercise, prove it (not really difficult):

enter image description here

This identity allows as to further group and negate terms to reach our much oversimplified formula:

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for giving an explanation which is easy to follow! –  anatolyg Jul 7 '13 at 19:31
    
Thanks! Note that I edited because the formula was incorrect. Rather than try to come up with the correct formula with rather difficult summations, I included a correct recursion algorithm. The methodology is still the same and the algorithm is still very quick –  user1125600 Jul 7 '13 at 20:26
    
+1 Nice answer! –  גלעד ברקן Jul 8 '13 at 0:59
    
+1 for the great work, :) not to mention the illustration –  aah134 Jul 8 '13 at 2:02
1  
once u clarify this one for the "ab" for length 2 X1=1,X2=2 so the formula goes like this 1+26C2-(25C2*(23/25)) .Is this one right??if this is one is right the answer is not 27 can u clarify this one –  Rajesh Nadal Jul 8 '13 at 17:32

This is a combination of two problems: parsing a number in a base that isn't 10 and determining if input is sorted.

Note that, since this is probably homework, you probably can't just use existing methods to do the hard work.

share|improve this answer
2  
nice catch on determining if the input is sorted. I missed that one. :) –  Dark Star1 Jul 5 '13 at 20:37

For letters of this imaginary alphabet that are more than one character long, we may use the recursion:

XnXn-1..X1 = 
  max(n-1) 
      + (max(n-1) - last (n-1)-character letter before 
                    the first (n-1)-character letter after a)
  ... + (max(n-1) - last (n-1)-character letter before the
                    first (n-1)-character letter after the-letter-before-Xn)
  + 1 + ((Xn-1..X1) - first (n-1)-character letter after Xn)

where max(1) = z, max(2) = yz...

Haskell code:

import Data.List (sort)
import qualified Data.MemoCombinators as M

firstAfter letter numChars = take numChars $ tail [letter..]

lastBefore letter numChars = [toEnum (fromEnum letter - 1) :: Char] 
                          ++ reverse (take (numChars - 1) ['z','y'..])

max' numChars = reverse (take numChars ['z','y'..])

loop letter numChars = 
  foldr (\a b -> b 
                 + index (max' numChars) 
                 - index (lastBefore (head $ firstAfter a numChars) numChars)
        ) 0 ['a'..letter]

index = M.list M.char index' where
  index' letter
    | null (drop 1 letter)  = fromEnum (head letter) - 96
    | letter /= sort letter = 0
    | otherwise = index (max' (len - 1))
                + loop (head $ lastBefore xn 1) (len - 1)
                + 1
                + index (tail letter) - index (firstAfter xn (len - 1))
   where len = length letter
         xn = head letter

Output:

*Main> index "abcde"
17902

*Main> index "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
67108863
(0.39 secs, 77666880 bytes)
share|improve this answer

Base 26 numbering system. I would suggest you look at octal, decimal and hexadecimal numbering systems once you understand how to figure out convert any of them to decimal you will know this one too.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's more complex than that. The maximum value of each column is based on the column that precedes it, which means each column has a different numerical base. Thus the string aef has base 26 for the first column, base 22 for the second column and base 21 for the third column. –  Ant Jul 5 '13 at 20:40

This really ought to be a comment, but I can't put code in a comment.

I wrote a brute force program to calculate the number of one, two, three, four, and five letter words, based on the criteria the original poster provided.

Imagine an alphabet of words such that the sequence of characters in a word has to be in ascending order only.

Here are the results of my program.

One letter words   - 26
Two letter words   - 325
Three letter words - 2600
Four letter words  - 14950
Five letter words  - 65780

Total words        - 83681

My "solution" would be to generate a dictionary of all the words from a to abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz.

Here's the code I used. Maybe someone can look at the nested loops and come up with a formula. I can't.

public class WordSequence implements Runnable {

    private int wordCount = 0;

    @Override
    public void run() {
        int count = createOneLetterWords();
        System.out.println("One letter words   - " + count);
        count = createTwoLetterWords();
        System.out.println("Two letter words   - " + count);
        count = createThreeLetterWords();
        System.out.println("Three letter words - " + count);
        count = createFourLetterWords();
        System.out.println("Four letter words  - " + count);
        count = createFiveLetterWords();
        System.out.println("Five letter words  - " + count);

        System.out.println("\nTotal words        - " + wordCount);
    }

    private int createOneLetterWords() {
        int count = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < 26; i++) {
            createWord(i);
            wordCount++;
            count++;
        }
        return count;
    }

    private int createTwoLetterWords() {
        int count = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < 25; i++) {
            for (int j = i + 1; j < 26; j++) {
                createWord(i, j);
                wordCount++;
                count++;
            }
        }
        return count;
    }

    private int createThreeLetterWords() {
        int count = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < 24; i++) {
            for (int j = i + 1; j < 25; j++) {
                for (int k = j + 1; k < 26; k++) {
                    createWord(i, j, k);
                    wordCount++;
                    count++;
                }
            }
        }
        return count;
    }

    private int createFourLetterWords() {
        int count = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < 23; i++) {
            for (int j = i + 1; j < 24; j++) {
                for (int k = j + 1; k < 25; k++) {
                    for (int m = k + 1; m < 26; m++) {
                        createWord(i, j, k, m);
                        wordCount++;
                        count++;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        return count;
    }

    private int createFiveLetterWords() {
        int count = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < 22; i++) {
            for (int j = i + 1; j < 23; j++) {
                for (int k = j + 1; k < 24; k++) {
                    for (int m = k + 1; m < 25; m++) {
                        for (int n = m + 1; n < 26; n++) {
                            createWord(i, j, k, m, n);
                            wordCount++;
                            count++;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        return count;
    }

    private String createWord(int... letter) {
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

        for (int i = 0; i < letter.length; i++) {
            builder.append((char) (letter[i] + 'a'));
        }

        return builder.toString();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new WordSequence().run();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
(my answer shows a recursive formula at the end, although it could benefit from a test or some peer review) –  גלעד ברקן Jul 6 '13 at 9:12
    
@groovy: I suspect your recursive formula is going to run into problems when you get to 10 and 11 letter words. At some point, the number of words for a letter count will decrease from the number of words for a smaller letter count. My dictionary idea would be a good test platform for any recursive calculation. I suspect that there are less than 2 million words from a to abc...xyz. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Jul 6 '13 at 11:54
    
Coded. Please see my updated answer for code and output. Thanks to your results I could verify the algorithm. –  גלעד ברקן Jul 7 '13 at 2:34
    
The number of words are combinations. 26C1 = 26, 26C2 = 325, 26C3 = 2600, 26C4 = 14950. The total number of words is 2^26-1 (about 6.7 million) stats.stackexchange.com/questions/27266/… –  user1125600 Jul 7 '13 at 21:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.