Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I searched Google and stackoverflow for combinations of "open source", "MySQL extension" and "deprecated" but did not find a workaround to assist with MySQL extension deprecation. What I'm imagining is a set of classes or functions that take the exact same input and outputs results in the exact same format, but does so with PDO rather than the MySQL extension. Other open source workarounds would be appreciated. Also, if anyone knows when exactly the MySQL extension is scheduled to be removed, I would really like to know - I scoured the internet for that and didn't find it.

Note: I do realize that re-writing the code is better because then I can utilize security features like bound params, (I have been using PDO and bound params when writing new code or re-writing old code, with the intention of replacing it all as I go, so a significant portion of the website's code is already there) but I have a lot of old code to maintain on this website which is still using the MySQL extension and I'm concerned that it's going to take me longer to convert it than I have. I have been given other priorities at work and it's not feasible to expect that I will be given the time to do this all at once as a separate project. In order to ensure the website survives the removal of this feature, I must ensure that all the older code and open source continues to function when the MySQL extension is removed. I could theoretically turn off PHP updates, but that might present security risks and would force me to continue to write old code when I could be writing new code. I could wait and see if I have time to do this later, but I couldn't find the date on which the MySQL extension will be removed, so that feels too much like gambling.

If anyone has other useful suggestions, I would be interested in hearing about them.

P.S. In fact, I do plan to speak to my manager about MySQL deprecation and asking this question is part of my preparation process. The first thing he is going to ask is "Have you looked for a workaround?" If I say no, he is going to send me away to list our options. Additionally, he has already been advised about the security projects we should do. Do remember that the economy isn't stellar and IT is in demand - our IT department is understaffed, and there really isn't enough time to do all the things we've prioritized. Please withhold condescending sentiments.

share|improve this question
1  
PHP is open source IIRC, so use the mysqli extension if you don't go PDO – Sterling Archer Jul 5 '13 at 22:57
    
I think mysqli_* functions almost take you there, the main exception that they require passing connection explicitly. – complex857 Jul 5 '13 at 22:58
up vote 0 down vote accepted

If your code is secure, I wouldn't worry about the libraries being deprecated. They haven't been removed from PHP yet and probably won't for a while. When they're removed, they'll be put into an external library by somebody, which every single host will install.

The reason to rewrite would be security, i.e. if you aren't sure that your code is injection-proof, not the deprecation of a library which has only been deprecated but some people can't use it.

share|improve this answer
2  
Totally agree, although all new projects should definitely be written using mysqli and/or PDO. – Harry Finn Jul 6 '13 at 12:26
2  
Yes, definitely. And they should be written in such a way that changing the database implementation is practical i.e. not calling database functions from a bunch of different places; abstract database functions in a single class, use those methods and then when your DB changes you just have to change one class. – Silent Echo Jul 6 '13 at 12:30
    
Thank you very much, Lightning Dust. This sounds like a realistic workaround to me. As for security, I have two layers of input filters currently, so MySQL injection should not be an issue. I'd really, really like to use bound parameters too so as to have the advantage of the "defense in depth" principle - but I suppose I will just have to continue to upgrade the code to use bound parameters as I go (unless we're able to prioritize this over other things). – faerie Jul 8 '13 at 16:53
    
@faerie - What with mysql being up to 100x faster than PDO, I wouldn't be too hasty in switching. – Silent Echo Jul 8 '13 at 16:56
    
The mysql extension has been removed from upcoming PHP 7 (to be released in October 2015). The extension has been moved to a pecl extension, which is not officially maintained anymore. – Christopher K. May 18 '15 at 9:12

Please see http://www.php.net/manual/en/mysqlinfo.api.choosing.php for some differences between the deprecated mysql functions and the alternatives (mysqli and PDO).

Using the deprecated mysql functions at this point is irresponsible. It needs to be rewritten. You mentioned that you have been given other priorities at work, and you can't spend the time to rewrite the old code bases. Your responsibility as a developer is to communicate effectively when stuff like this comes up. Given your experience writing new code in PDO, I would estimate the time it takes to rewrite the mysql functions to use PDO. Then schedule a time to talk with your manager/boss and bring up the following.

  • Due to the features being removed and the current code being a security vulnerability, parts of the code need to be rewritten.
  • It will take X hours.

Be persistent but polite. If your manager/boss still is now willing to let you spend the time doing maintenance, I recommend updating your resume and finding a better company.

share|improve this answer
    
In fact, I do plan to speak to my manager about this and asking this question is part of my preparation process. The first thing he is going to ask is "Have you looked for a workaround?" If I say no, he is going to send me away to list our options. Additionally, he has already been advised about the security projects we should do. Do remember that the economy isn't stellar and IT is in demand - our IT department is understaffed, and there really isn't enough time to do all the things we've prioritized. I feel condescended to and don't appreciate it. – faerie Jul 5 '13 at 23:36
    
I understand where you're coming from. That's a tough position. If I were in your position, I would just explain that the "workaround" is rewriting that portion of the code. Either rewrite it now, or rewrite it when it literally stops working. Hopefully your boss isn't that dense. Good luck. – roberttstephens Jul 6 '13 at 4:56
    
Thanks for deciding to be understanding. FYI, I already started the project of rewriting the code to use PDO and bound params - but I've been fitting it in whenever I have the time rather than trying to do it all at once (because other projects have been prioritized). See the original post: "I have been using PDO and bound params when writing new code or re-writing old code, so a significant portion of the website's code is already there". This will get me there eventually, but I was concerned that this might not be fast enough to beat the MySQL extension removal. I'll reword for clarity. – faerie Jul 8 '13 at 16:39

I found this question when doing some research prompted by the constant "mysql_ is deprecated" comments on PHP/MySQL questions - which do little to help solve the problem.

It is likely that some day the mysql_ extension will be dropped from PHP (if it has not already done so). It is also desirable that you should keep your platform up to date with patches. So it's almost inevitable that one day your code will stop working.

You should therefore be planning how to mitigate the impact of that.

One solution is to wrap the mysqli_xxx() functions in declarations for the corresponding mysql_xxx() functions. Then you only need to worry about including the file containing these mappings and replacing any calls to is_resource($mysql_handle). The library available here does that and provides some useful pointers on implementing the shim.

It would be nice if it were possible to tackle the problem from the other direction - implement wrappers around the mysql_xxx() functions declared as mysqli_xxx(). Although it would not be possible to implement all the functionality (e.g. asynchronous queries) implementing just those with a 1:1 mapping would allow the developer to start writing for the new API before it is available in the platform. However I am not aware of any implementation of this.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.