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I am trying to come up with a general (opinionated) way of handling exceptions in NodeJS that doesn't use try catch due to the performance hit. I also want to stay away from libraries like streamline that try to make async code look like sync code.

It seems that Domains fit the bill well but I wanted to invite comments/ suggestions on the way I propose to use them. Are there significant problems with this approach?

I plan to make the majority of my async functions follow the pattern of the domainAware function below:

function errorinAsync(options, callback){
    options = options || {};
    setTimeout(function(){
        return callback(new Error("This should be caught"));
    },1000);

}
function domainAware(options, callback){
    if(domain.active){
        d = domain.active;
    }else{
        d = domain.create();
        d.on('error', function(err){
            return callback(err);
        });
    }

    d.run(function(){
        //Some Synchronous code that might throw an exception;
        var a = {b: 1, c: 2};
        var thing = JSON.stringify(a);
        errorinAsync(null,d.intercept(function(err) {
            return callback(null);
        }));
    });
}

What I want to do is avoid throwing an error in an async function. This is mainly for situations where I don't have any specific exceptions that I want to handle but I want to ensure that exceptions don't get 'lost'.

I can call it with a domain context:

var d = domain.create();
d.on('error', function(er) {
  console.error('Caught error!', er);
});
d.run(function() {
    domainAware(null, d.intercept(function(err) {
        console.log("all Done");
    }));
});

Or without one:

domainAware(null, function(err){
    if(err){
        return console.log("Caught Error from Callback" + err);
    }
    console.log("all Done");
});

This contrived example works well, but what about more complex scenarios with many functions.

Update: #1

An equivalent function using try catch might be:

function noHandling(callback){
    var a = {b: 1, c: 2};
    var thing = JSON.stringify(a);
    errorinAsync(null,function(err) {
        if(err) return callback(err);
        return callback(null);
    });
}

function notDomainAware(options, callback){
    try{
        noHandling(callback);
    }catch(err){
        callback(err);
    }
}

I will do some performance tests on these two approaches to see if there is any difference.

Other than performance is there any other problem with using the domain based approach? A revised version of the domain aware function could look like this.

function domainAware(options, callback){
    var d = domain.active || domain.create().on('error', function(err){ return callback(err); });

    d.run(function(){
        //Some Synchronous code that might throw an exception;
        var a = {b: 1, c: 2};
        var thing = JSON.stringify(a);
        errorinAsync(null,d.intercept(function(err) {
            return callback(null);
        }));
    });
}

I like the simplicity of the domain based version, but is it more or less equivalent? Of course you do need to remember to use d.intercept or check the err of any callbacks, but I can handle that.

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1  
the try catch only slows down the code around it, so try{doSomethingSlow()} will NOT slow down the called function due optimization obstruction. –  dandavis Jul 6 '13 at 0:29
    
@dandavis, I have made an update to include the try catch equivalent version. I will do some performance testing to see if there is any difference –  Sudsy Jul 6 '13 at 4:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

UPDATE

I have done some more work on this and found a great way of writing async functions using domains that eliminates most of the exception handling boilerplate and performs better than try catch exception handling in some cases:

http://www.lighthouselogic.com/using-a-new-domain-for-each-async-function-in-node/

This supersedes much of what is written in the post below. In fact the function useExistingDomainifAvailable that I proposed below has side effects that I didn't consider when writing this original answer. The main one being that error handling is always done via a short circuit back to the domain exception handler rather than through the callback chain.

UPDATE

So, I did some performance testing and found that the domain version is actually about the same as wrapping the function body in a try catch:

The following two functions were used in all my tests:

function doSomethingAsync(options, callback){
    options = options || {};
    setTimeout(function(){
        return callback(null);
    },1);

}

function callThroughDomain(fn, callback) {
    var d = domain.create();
    d.on('error', function(er) {
      console.error('Caught error!', er);
    });
    d.run(function() {
        fn(1000000, d.intercept(callback));
    });
}

I started with a control:

function tryCatchCallback(j, callback) {
        try{    
            var s = 0;
            for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
            for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
            for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
            for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
            doSomethingAsync(null, function(err){
                //Just like domain.intercept, exceptions in the callback are handled
                try{
                    if(err) return callback(err);
                    callback(s);
                }catch(ex){
                    callback(ex);
                }

            });
        }
        catch(ex) {
            callback(ex);
        }
}

The test for which was:

callThroughDomain(tryCatchCallback, function(){
    deferred.resolve();
});

Then I tried with using the pre-declared domain:

function useExistingDomainifAvailable(j, callback) {
    var d = domain.active || domain.create().on('error', function(err){ return callback(err); });

    d.run(function(){
        var s = 0;
        for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
        for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
        for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
        for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
        doSomethingAsync(null, d.intercept(function(err){
            callback(s);
        }));
    });
}

callThroughDomain(useExistingDomainifAvailable, function(){
    deferred.resolve();
});

Then I tried with the guts of the function being called by an external try catch

function tryCatchOuter(j, callback) {
    try{
        outer(1000000, callback);
    }catch(e){
        console.log(e);
    }
}

function outer(j, callback) {
    var s = 0;
    for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
    for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
    for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
    for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
    doSomethingAsync(null, function(err){
        //Again catching errors from callback
        try{
            if(err) return callback(err);
            callback(s);
        }catch(ex){
            callback(ex)
        }

    });
}

callThroughDomain(tryCatchOuter, function(){
    deferred.resolve();
});

The results of my benchmark.js tests are as follows:

control x 42.12 ops/sec ±0.83% (38 runs sampled)
useExistingDomainifAvailable x 41.98 ops/sec ±6.67% (44 runs sampled)
tryCatchOuter x 93.23 ops/sec ±2.07% (66 runs sampled)
Fastest is tryCatchOuter

Showing a significant performance gain for the tryCatchOuter scenario.

And for a final comparison trying the domains with the external function body

function domainWithOuter(j, callback) {
    var d = domain.active || domain.create().on('error', function(err){ return callback(err); });

    d.run(function(){
        outerNoHandler(j,callback);
    });
}

function outerNoHandler(j, callback) {
    var s = 0;
    for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
    for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
    for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
    for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) s = i;
    doSomethingAsync(null, function(err){
            //Don't need try catch here 
            //Exceptions managed by domain
            if(err) return callback(err);
            callback(s);
    });
}

control x 42.75 ops/sec ±1.06% (39 runs sampled)
useExistingDomainifAvailable x 42.86 ops/sec ±6.81% (38 runs sampled)
tryCatchOuter x 95.86 ops/sec ±2.35% (68 runs sampled)
domainWithOuter x 94.65 ops/sec ±1.91% (67 runs sampled)
Fastest is tryCatchOuter,domainWithOuter

So essentially using the domain is the same as using try catch in terms of performance in this case with some differences in syntax.

I guess because domain.run and doman.intercept use try catch under the covers, they need to be used in a similar way with the same performance caveats.

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