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I had an exception in some code today: "A [some exception] was unhandled."

However, this code was clearly inside the "try" block of a "try/catch" structure.

What am I missing here?

Update: It's C#

Update: Oh, forget it. It turns out the specific mechanism of error is that I'm an idiot. There's no fix for this.

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3  
What language/framework are you using? –  stusmith Nov 17 '09 at 16:08
    
Can you post some code? –  Philip Wallace Nov 17 '09 at 16:09
    
If you post your code, it might be easier to diagnose your problem –  Kevin Laity Nov 17 '09 at 16:09
    
Needs more info. Try posting some ocde. –  Mizipzor Nov 17 '09 at 16:16
2  
As embarassing as it may be would you like to add some details of what assumption you had made or what concept you had misunderstood? At least that way someone who is struggling with the same issue may have a chance of finding the resolution. –  Matt Breckon Nov 17 '09 at 17:32

6 Answers 6

Does the catch statement specify a specific type of exception?

If it does, it will only catch that type of exception.

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I'm catching "Exception." Doesn't every derive from that? –  Deane Nov 17 '09 at 16:32
    
Not necessarily, try not specifying anything at all in the catch block. –  Kevin Laity Nov 17 '09 at 16:40

Were you running in a debugger with "break on exceptions"/"break on thrown" switched on? In this case you'll see the exception before it is passed to the try/catch.

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This was in the debugger, yes. This could be it. In Visual Studio, is that a setting somewhere? –  Deane Nov 17 '09 at 16:33
    
When you got the exception could you continue and then see it go into the try/catch? The exception settings are normally under "Debug->Exceptions". Depending on the language there are different things you can do. –  Matt Breckon Nov 17 '09 at 17:29

Unmanaged exceptions will not be caught by catch(Exception e),you can try a

    try
    {
    }
    catch
    {
    }

instead of

        try
        {
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
        }
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I have 10 dollars that says its a ThreadAbortException or some other self-throwing exception. If that is the case you must catch the exception twice.

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some problems caused by Recursion such as StackOverFlow exceptions and the like will throw inside of try...catch blocks because they are not actually thrown from any particular line of code within the block, but rather by the CLR. This is also true for Memory out of range exceptions and other problems that aren't the direct result of any one line of code.

Maybe you're talking about something like this:

alt text

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Without knowing the language it's difficult to say, but many languages have the concept of exceptions that cannot be caught - for example in .NET, OutOfMemoryException and ExecutionEngineException (amongst others) cannot be caught, since they are essentially non-recoverable.

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