Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

can any body tell the difference between far pointer and near pointer in C?

share|improve this question
3  
do those still exist even? –  jldupont Nov 17 '09 at 16:10
2  
Oh my... this brings back memories –  Stefano Borini Nov 17 '09 at 16:38
2  
@Stefano Borini: Yeah, it also triggers PTSD. ;v) –  Fred Larson Nov 17 '09 at 17:15
    
Good times. Well, not really. Watcom C/C++ 32-bit compiler 4tw! –  Mhmmd Aug 7 '10 at 18:27
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

To quote Wikipedia,

Four registers are used to refer to four segments on the 16-bit x86 segmented memory architecture. DS (data segment), CS (code segment), SS (stack segment), and ES (extra segment). A logical address on this platform is written segment:offset, in hexadecimal.

Near pointers refer (as an offset) to the current segment.

Far pointers use segment info and an offset to point across segments. So, to use them, DS or CS must be changed to the specified value, the memory will be dereferenced and then the original value of DS/CS restored. Note that pointer arithmetic on them doesn't modify the segment portion of the pointer, so overflowing the offset will just wrap it around.

And then there are huge pointers, which are normalized to have the highest possible segment for a given address (contrary to far pointers).

On 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, memory models are using segments differently, or not at all.

share|improve this answer
1  
This would be clearer if you explain what a segment (and an offset in the case of one) is. "Segments" as used by DOS are a little arcane, imho. –  quark Nov 17 '09 at 16:28
10  
They are not arcane. They are insane. –  Stefano Borini Nov 17 '09 at 16:39
add comment

Far and near pointers were used in old platforms like DOS.

I don't think they're relevant in modern platforms. But you can learn about them here and here (as pointed by other answers). Basically, a far pointer is a way to extend the addressable memory in a computer. I.E., address more than 64k of memory in a 16bit platform.

share|improve this answer
1  
I believe some operating systems can access more than 4GB of memory on a 32-bit system. In this case such extended pointer types are necessary. However it is rare for the operating system to allow user mode applications access to more than 4GB in such an environment. –  PP. Nov 17 '09 at 16:20
    
Yes. That is because the x86 physical address bus is 36 bits wide for 32 bit machines. But the logical address space is still limited to 32bits. The PAE extensions make the "extra" memory available (in fact by means of bankswitching, IIRC) The real problem is that the MMU is kept out, more or less (no mmap, COW, etc). But the memory can be used as diskbuffer for apps that do their own buffering. Or the OS that handles the bankswitching and MMU manipulation. –  wildplasser Jan 29 '12 at 16:53
add comment

I can't, but I think wikipedia can.

share|improve this answer
4  
bah - beat me too it... I was going to paste the same link! –  robince Nov 17 '09 at 16:14
    
Have an upvote on your comment, then :-) –  Suppressingfire Nov 17 '09 at 16:16
add comment

A pointer basically holds addresses. As we all know, Intel memory management is divided into 4 segments. So when an address pointed to by a pointer is within the same segment, then it is a near pointer and therefore it requires only 2 bytes for offset. On the other hand, when a pointer points to an address which is out of the segment (that means in another segment), then that pointer is a far pointer. It consist of 4 bytes: two for segment and two for offset.

share|improve this answer
1  
Welcome to StackOverflow. When you see a question such as this from a couple of years ago with an accepted answer with a fair number of up-votes, it is certainly still permitted to answer the question, but you are only likely to garner up-votes yourself if your answer is well written and provides accurate new information that none of the other answers provides. I'm not sure that your answer meets that standard. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 29 '12 at 16:40
    
'Intel memory management is divided into 4 segments'? There may be 4 segment registers (I'm not certain), but there are many more than 4 segments. You've not really explained how this works for a 16-bit system, where segments and offsets were necessary. You should then cover 32-bit systems and mention whether 64-bit systems have any significantly different (as opposed to just larger) characteristics. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 29 '12 at 16:47
add comment

Four registers are used to refer to four segments on the 16-bit x86 segmented memory architecture. DS (data segment), CS (code segment), SS (stack segment), and ES (extra segment). A logical address on this platform is written segment:offset, in hexadecimal.

Near pointers refer (as an offset) to the current segment.

Far pointers use segment info and an offset to point across segments. So, to use them, DS or CS must be changed to the specified value, the memory will be dereferenced and then the original value of DS/CS restored. Note that pointer arithmetic on them doesn't modify the segment portion of the pointer, so overflowing the offset will just wrap it around.

And then there are huge pointers, which are normalized to have the highest possible segment for a given address (contrary to far pointers).

On 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, memory models are using segments differently, or not at all.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.