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Can anybody tell me the difference between far pointers and near pointers in C?

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5  
do those still exist even? – jldupont Nov 17 '09 at 16:10
4  
Oh my... this brings back memories – Stefano Borini Nov 17 '09 at 16:38
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@Stefano Borini: Yeah, it also triggers PTSD. ;v) – Fred Larson Nov 17 '09 at 17:15
    
Good times. Well, not really. Watcom C/C++ 32-bit compiler 4tw! – Mhmmd Aug 7 '10 at 18:27
up vote 28 down vote accepted

To quote Wikipedia,

Four registers are used to refer to four segments on the 16-bit x86 segmented memory architecture. DS (data segment), CS (code segment), SS (stack segment), and ES (extra segment). A logical address on this platform is written segment:offset, in hexadecimal.

Near pointers refer (as an offset) to the current segment.

Far pointers use segment info and an offset to point across segments. So, to use them, DS or CS must be changed to the specified value, the memory will be dereferenced and then the original value of DS/CS restored. Note that pointer arithmetic on them doesn't modify the segment portion of the pointer, so overflowing the offset will just wrap it around.

And then there are huge pointers, which are normalized to have the highest possible segment for a given address (contrary to far pointers).

On 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, memory models are using segments differently, or not at all.

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2  
This would be clearer if you explain what a segment (and an offset in the case of one) is. "Segments" as used by DOS are a little arcane, imho. – quark Nov 17 '09 at 16:28
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They are not arcane. They are insane. – Stefano Borini Nov 17 '09 at 16:39

Far and near pointers were used in old platforms like DOS.

I don't think they're relevant in modern platforms. But you can learn about them here and here (as pointed by other answers). Basically, a far pointer is a way to extend the addressable memory in a computer. I.E., address more than 64k of memory in a 16bit platform.

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1  
I believe some operating systems can access more than 4GB of memory on a 32-bit system. In this case such extended pointer types are necessary. However it is rare for the operating system to allow user mode applications access to more than 4GB in such an environment. – PP. Nov 17 '09 at 16:20
    
Yes. That is because the x86 physical address bus is 36 bits wide for 32 bit machines. But the logical address space is still limited to 32bits. The PAE extensions make the "extra" memory available (in fact by means of bankswitching, IIRC) The real problem is that the MMU is kept out, more or less (no mmap, COW, etc). But the memory can be used as diskbuffer for apps that do their own buffering. Or the OS that handles the bankswitching and MMU manipulation. – wildplasser Jan 29 '12 at 16:53

A pointer basically holds addresses. As we all know, Intel memory management is divided into 4 segments. So when an address pointed to by a pointer is within the same segment, then it is a near pointer and therefore it requires only 2 bytes for offset. On the other hand, when a pointer points to an address which is out of the segment (that means in another segment), then that pointer is a far pointer. It consist of 4 bytes: two for segment and two for offset.

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1  
Welcome to StackOverflow. When you see a question such as this from a couple of years ago with an accepted answer with a fair number of up-votes, it is certainly still permitted to answer the question, but you are only likely to garner up-votes yourself if your answer is well written and provides accurate new information that none of the other answers provides. I'm not sure that your answer meets that standard. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 29 '12 at 16:40
    
'Intel memory management is divided into 4 segments'? There may be 4 segment registers (I'm not certain), but there are many more than 4 segments. You've not really explained how this works for a 16-bit system, where segments and offsets were necessary. You should then cover 32-bit systems and mention whether 64-bit systems have any significantly different (as opposed to just larger) characteristics. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 29 '12 at 16:47

Since nobody mentioned DOS, lets forget about old DOS PC computers and look at this from a generic point-of-view. Then, very simplified, it goes like this:


Any CPU has a data bus, which is the maximum amount of data the CPU can process in one single instruction, i.e equal to the size of its registers. The data bus width is expressed in bits: 8 bits, or 16 bits, or 64 bits etc. This is where the term "64 bit CPU" comes from - it refers to the data bus.

Any CPU has an address bus, also with a certain bus width expressed in bits. Any memory cell in your computer that the CPU can access directly has an unique address. The address bus is large enough to cover all the addressable memory you have.

For example, if a computer has 65536 bytes of addressable memory, you can cover these with a 16 bit address bus, 2^16 = 65536.

Most often, but not always, the data bus width is as wide as the address bus width. It is nice if they are of the same size, as it keeps both the CPU instruction set and the programs written for it clearer. If the CPU needs to calculate an address, it is convenient if that address is small enough to fit inside the CPU registers (often called index registers when it comes to addresses).

The non-standard keywords far and near are used to describe pointers on systems where you need to address memory beyond the normal CPU address bus width.

For example, it might be convenient for a CPU with 16 bit data bus to also have a 16 bit address bus. But the same computer may also need more than 2^16 = 65536 bytes = 64kb of addressable memory.

The CPU will then typically have special instructions (that are slightly slower) which allows it to address memory beyond those 64kb. For example, the CPU can divide its large memory into n pages (also sometimes called banks, segments and other such terms, that could mean a different thing from one CPU to another), where every page is 64kb. It will then have a "page" register which has to be set first, before addressing that extended memory. Similarly, it will have special instructions when calling/returning from sub routines in extended memory.

In order for a C compiler to generate the correct CPU instructions when dealing with such extended memory, the non-standard near and far keywords were invented. Non-standard as in they aren't specified by the C standard, but they are de facto industry standard and almost every compiler supports them in some manner.

far refers to memory located in extended memory, beyond the width of the address bus. Since it refers to addresses, most often you use it when declaring pointers. For example: int * far x; means "give me a pointer that points to extended memory". And the compiler will then know that it should generate the special instructions needed to access such memory. Similarly, function pointers that use far will generate special instructions to jump to/return from extended memory. If you didn't use far then you would get a pointer to the normal, addressable memory, and you'd end up pointing at something entirely different.

near is mainly included for consistency with far; it refers to anything in the addressable memory as is equivalent to a regular pointer. So it is mainly a useless keyword, save for some rare cases where you want to ensure that code is placed inside the standard addressable memory. You could then explicitly label something as near. The most typical case is low-level hardware programming where you write interrupt service routines. They are called by hardware from an interrupt vector with a fixed width, which is the same as the address bus width. Meaning that the interrupt service routine must be in the standard addressable memory.


The most famous use of far and near is perhaps the mentioned old MS DOS PC, which is nowadays regarded as quite ancient and therefore of mild interest.

But these keywords exist on more modern CPUs too! Most notably in embedded systems where they exist for pretty much every 8 and 16 bit microcontroller family on the market, as those microcontrollers typically have an address bus width of 16 bits, but sometimes more than 64kb memory.

Whenever you have a CPU where you need to address memory beyond the address bus width, you will have the need of far and near. Generally, such solutions are frowned upon though, since it is quite a pain to program on them and always take the extended memory in account.

One of the main reasons why there was a push to develop the 64 bit PC, was actually that the 32 bit PCs had come to the point where their memory usage was starting to hit the address bus limit: they could only address 4Gb of RAM. 2^32 = 4,29 billion bytes = 4Gb. In order to enable the use of more RAM, the options were then either to resort to some burdensome extended memory solution like in the DOS days, or to expand the computers, including their address bus, to 64 bits.

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Four registers are used to refer to four segments on the 16-bit x86 segmented memory architecture. DS (data segment), CS (code segment), SS (stack segment), and ES (extra segment). A logical address on this platform is written segment:offset, in hexadecimal.

Near pointers refer (as an offset) to the current segment.

Far pointers use segment info and an offset to point across segments. So, to use them, DS or CS must be changed to the specified value, the memory will be dereferenced and then the original value of DS/CS restored. Note that pointer arithmetic on them doesn't modify the segment portion of the pointer, so overflowing the offset will just wrap it around.

And then there are huge pointers, which are normalized to have the highest possible segment for a given address (contrary to far pointers).

On 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, memory models are using segments differently, or not at all.

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Four registers are used to refer to four segments on the 16-bit x86 segmented memory architecture. DS (data segment), CS (code segment), SS (stack segment), and ES (extra segment). A logical address on this platform is written segment:offset, in hexadecimal.

Well those registers are actually used for different purposes. As you mentioned yourself CODE, DATA, STACK, EXTRA registers. Of course there are AX,BX,DX,CX as well. But CS was for CODE, DS was for DATA, SS was for Stack and ES - was for extending existing data and code variables. AX/BX/CX/DX in DOS times was very important. As any other register. When interrupt functions (INT) was called a lot of them relied on actual registry values.

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Well in DOS it was kind of funny dealing with registers. And Segments. All about maximum counting capacities of RAM.

Today it is pretty much irrelevant. All you need to read is difference about virtual/user space and kernel.

Since win nt4 (when they stole ideas from *nix) microsoft programmers started to use what was called user/kernel memory spaces. And avoided direct access to physical controllers since then. Since then dissapered a problem dealing with direct access to memory segments as well. - Everything became R/W through OS.

However if you insist on understanding and manipulating far/near pointers look at linux kernel source and how it works - you will newer come back I guess.

And if you still need to use CS (Code Segment)/DS (Data Segment) in DOS. Look at these:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Memory_Model http://www.digitalmars.com/ctg/ctgMemoryModel.html

I would like to point out to perfect answer below.. from Lundin. I was too lazy to answer properly. Lundin gave very detailed and sensible explanation "thumbs up"!

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