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So remove_reference or remove_pointer always return the primitive type.

I know that they use so called template specialization to do that in the template meta-programming, but I don't quite understand how.

For example below.

template<class T>
struct AAA
{
    typedef T Type;
};

template<class T>
struct AAA<T*>
{
    // Why does T become int, not int * all of sudden?
    // How come does this get rid of '*' in a specific way?
    typedef T Type;
};

int main()
{
    AAA<int *>::Type MyVar = 3; // MyVar is not a pointer!
    return 0;
}

Obviously I'm missing something, or some designated rules in using template, and I can't find any good articles that explain this well.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks in adavance.

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What does T need to be in the second specialization so that T* matches int*? –  GManNickG Jul 6 '13 at 3:40
    
@GManNickG I just fixed that. Sorry to have written a mistake. –  YayCplusplus Jul 6 '13 at 3:53
1  
Sorry, didn't even see that typo. That's not what I meant. I mean fill in the T in the question I gave you to see how the logic in C++ works. For T* to match int*, T needs to be int. That's why T is int in the second specialization. –  GManNickG Jul 6 '13 at 4:05
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted
// Why does T become int, not int * all of sudden?

T* is int*, so T must be int.

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