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It is my understanding that decltype is used to query the type of an objects/variables and so on.

From the examples present on wikipedia, such as the following:

int i;
decltype(i) x3; // type is int

I assumed I could do something like this:

class A
{
public:
    int a, b;
};

template<typename T>
struct IsClass
{
    enum { Yes = std::is_class<T>::value };
    enum { No = !Yes };
};

std::vector<A> v;
auto it = v.begin();
IsClass<decltype(it)::value_type>::Yes

Because after all this line is legal:

IsClass<std::vector<A>::iterator::value_type>::Yes

Alas it wouldn't compile, citing the following: error C2039: 'value_type' : is not a member of 'global namespace''`

Any ideas as to why scope resolution was made to behave this way in presence of decltype?

P.S: If it makes any difference I'm using MSVC2012 (without the Nov CTP)

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5  
gcc and clang seem to accept this: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/… –  Shafik Yaghmour Jul 6 '13 at 3:47
    
@ShafikYaghmour I just pasted this into MSVC2012 which I'm using (I added a note to this effect) and it does not compile. –  Borgleader Jul 6 '13 at 3:48
3  
MSVC does suck though, they haven't made the same progress implementing the standard as gcc and clang –  aaronman Jul 6 '13 at 4:26
    
This compiles though: IsClass<std::remove_reference<decltype(it)>::type::value_type>::Yes; My guess is that although it should be a value type, MSVC incorrectly yields a reference type here for decltype(it). –  icepack Jul 6 '13 at 4:51
1  
It is a know issue. Try typedef decltype(it) itType and then use it. –  Mr Universe Jul 6 '13 at 4:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is a known bug in the Visual C++ compiler. It has not yet been fixed as of the Visual C++ 2013 Preview. You can work around this issue using std::common_type:

IsClass<std::common_type<decltype(it)>::type::value_type>::Yes
        ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^            ^^^^^^^

(std::common_type with a single template argument yields that argument type; it's the standardized C++11 equivalent of the identity template that has long been used in metaprogramming.)

You can find the public bug report on Microsoft Connect: Cannot use decltype before scope operator. If this issue is important to you, please consider upvoting that bug report.

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1  
Still don't understand why they couldn't call it std::identity. Y'know, like everybody else. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 6 '13 at 18:31
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: There was an std::identity before, but it's been removed because it was unclear what exactly it should be (Just meta-programming identity, like std::common_type<T> is now? Functional identity?), IIRC. –  Xeo Jul 6 '13 at 18:34
    
@Lightness Races in Orbit: It doesn't look like a matter of what to "call" it. The functionality of std::common_type is wider than that of std::identity. It simply covers std::identity as well. So the question was really whether to keep std::identity as something with a prettier name or to remove it as something redundant. They removed it. –  AndreyT Jul 6 '13 at 18:44
1  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: In addition to the "let's not add extraneous things" argument, identity already had another meaning, in the original STL. I agree though, it would have been nice if there was an std::identity. It would indeed make things simpler to explain. –  James McNellis Jul 6 '13 at 18:57
1  
@James: Ah, the STL argument clinches it. Bastards! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 6 '13 at 19:01

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