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I have a list of data in ten columns as shown below. It has few thousands lines.

$1  $2    $3    $4   $5     $6      $7    $8    $9  $10

|  8455 105@O13  |  8132  101@H13  8131  101@O13 |  68.43
|  7490 93@O16   |  8868  110@H16  8867  110@O16 |  68.30
|  7561 94@O12   |  9185  114@H13  9184  114@O13 |  66.83
|  8776 109@O12  |  7481  93@H12   7480  93@O12  |  65.55
|  8867 110@O16  |  8432  105@H23  8431  105@O23 |  64.48
|  9832 122@O13  |  6357  79@H16   6356  79@O16  |  64.44
|  9194 114@O15  |  5699  71@H12   5698  71@O12  |  64.06
|  8849 110@O25  |  5780  72@H12   5779  72@O12  |  63.99

I want to select lines from column $3 and column $6 which match some special expression. The criteria that I would like to use as the regular expression is 'the number before "@" sign is same in both columns'. If the this criteria is matched, than I want to print those lines out to a new file.

I have tried in awk something like this

awk '$3~/[1@]/  {print $1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7,$8,$9,$10}' hhHB_inSameLayer_065_128-maltoLyo12per.tbl

but it doesn't give what I want.

I apreciate if anyone could give some help on this.

note: also appreciate if I get some help in perl or python.

Many thanks in advance.

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Do the first two lines actually exist in the file (the line with $1, $2... and the empty line) or did you just put it there for illustration purposes? –  doubleDown Jul 6 '13 at 5:16
    
Sorry for late response. Actually there are few lines (around 8 lines of text) in the original text. –  Vijay Jul 7 '13 at 13:33
    
Hello. Did you see my answer ? –  eyquem Jul 10 '13 at 13:07
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try the following in awk. Split $3 and $6 into arrays based on the @ separator and print if the first elements of each match

awk '{split($3, a, "@"); split($6, b, "@");if (a[1] == b[1]) print}'

Or more idiomatically

awk '{split($3, a, "@"); split($6, b, "@")}; a[1] == b[1]' 

Or a quick Python 2.6+ solution

from __future__ import print_function
with open('testfile.txt') as f:
    for line in f:
            fields = line.split()
            fields3 = fields[2].split('@')
            fields6 = fields[5].split('@')
            if fields3[0] == fields6[0]:
                    print(line, end='')
share|improve this answer
    
I tried the awk command. It works fine. Thanks to 1_CR. –  Vijay Jul 7 '13 at 13:03
    
@Vijay, good to know! please accept the answer if it works for you. –  1_CR Jul 7 '13 at 13:05
    
Additionally, in column $3, if I want to choose characters after the symbol '@', (example O13 or O25) what changes I should do? I tried like [ awk '{split($3, a,"@"); if (a[1]==O22) print }']. But seems like not working? –  Vijay Jul 7 '13 at 13:11
    
@Vijay, use a[2] to access O13 –  1_CR Jul 7 '13 at 13:20
    
I tried like this: [ awk '{split($3, a,"@"); if (a[2]==O12) print }']. But it seems doesn't work. For your information, there are few lines (e.g sentences) at the top of the file. I even deleted them and tried running. I get not output at all. Any suggestion? Thank you. –  Vijay Jul 7 '13 at 13:27
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Code for GNU :

sed -r '/^\|\s+\S+\s+([0-9]+@).*\|.*\1/!d' file

Assuming there is a header of two rows:

sed -r '1,2p;/^\|\s+\S+\s+([0-9]+@).*\|.*\1/!d' file
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Here's a Perl one-liner that uses a single regular expression pattern with a back-reference:

perl -ne 'print if m/^\S+\s+\S+\s+(\d+\@)\S+\s+\S+\s+\S+\s+\1/' hhHB_inSameLayer_065_128-maltoLyo12per.tbl > hhHB_inSameLayer_065_128-maltoLyo12per_reduced.tbl

(I'm surprised no one has pointed out the glaring flaw in Vijay's original problem statement yet: there isn't a record in the example that matches the stated criterion.)

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+1 for the solution and the remark –  eyquem Jul 7 '13 at 9:14
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Sigh, three solutions before I could even whip this up...

import re

write_file = open("sorted data.txt", "w")

with open("data.txt", "r") as read_file:
    for line in read_file:
        data_list = re.split("[\s\|@]+", line)
        if data_list[2] == data_list[5]:
            write_file.write(line)

write_file.close()

I'm afraid I've little knowledge of perl or awk, but this save for the re.split this is nice and readable.

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Here's a Python solution that uses the built-in csv module. It stores all the lines that match your criteria in the list stored_lines.

** Edited to skip header and not treat multiple spaces as multiple delimiters. **

import csv

def is_good(line):
    return line[2][:line[2].find('@')] == line[5][:line[5].find('@')]

# we'll put the lines that match the criteria here.
stored_lines = []

with open('stack.txt') as fr:
    csv_reader = csv.reader(fr, delimiter=' ', skipinitialspace=True)

    # Skip the header
    csv_reader.next()
    csv_reader.next()
    for line in csv_reader:
         if is_good(line): stored_lines.append(line)

print(stored_lines)
share|improve this answer
    
You need to make a couple changes to make this work with the input file described by the OP. First, you need to skip the first two lines. I believe there is a way to tell csv reader that the first line is headers, but your code will error on the blank line anyway. Also, because the delim is ' ', your indexes need to be 3 and 9 instead of 2 and 5. –  sberry Jul 6 '13 at 4:47
    
@sberry Good catch on needing to skip the first two lines; I have made that correction. I fixed the indexing issue by ignoring multiple spaces (by setting skipinitialspace=True). If I've screwed up anywhere else I'll have to fix it tomorrow--it's bed time here. –  Cody Piersall Jul 6 '13 at 5:29
    
In the doc on csv module: "If csvfile is a file object, it must be opened with the ‘b’ flag on platforms where that makes a difference." –  eyquem Jul 7 '13 at 9:22
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In Perl:

while( <DATA> ){

  # split the line by whitespace
  my @columns = split;

  # get number from column 3
  my ( $value_col_3 ) = $columns[2] =~ m{ \A (\d+) \@ }msx;

  # get number from column 6
  my ( $value_col_6 ) = $columns[5] =~ m{ \A (\d+) \@ }msx;

  if( $value_col_3 == $value_col_6 ){
    print;
  }
}

__DATA__
|  8455 105@O13  |  8132  101@H13  8131  101@O13 |  68.43
|  7490 93@O16   |  8868  110@H16  8867  110@O16 |  68.30
|  7561 94@O12   |  9185  114@H13  9184  114@O13 |  66.83
|  8776 109@O12  |  7481  93@H12   7480  93@O12  |  65.55
|  8867 110@O16  |  8432  105@H23  8431  105@O23 |  64.48
|  9832 122@O13  |  6357  79@H16   6356  79@O16  |  64.44
|  9194 114@O15  |  5699  71@H12   5698  71@O12  |  64.06
|  8849 110@O25  |  5780  72@H12   5779  72@O12  |  63.99
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import re

su = '''
$1  $2    $3    $4   $5     $6      $7    $8    $9  $10

|  8455 105@O13  |  8132  101@H13  8131  101@O13 |  68.43
|  7490 93@O16   |  8868  110@H16  8867  110@O16 |  68.30
|  7561 94@O12   |  9185  94@H13  9184  114@O13 |  66.83
|  8776 109@O12  |  7481  93@H12   7480  93@O12  |  65.55
|  8867 110@O16  |  8432  105@H23  8431  105@O23 |  64.48
|  9832 122@O13  |  6357  79@H16   6356  79@O16  |  64.44
|  9194 114@O15  |  5699  71@H12   5698  71@O12  |  64.06
|  8849 110@O25  |  5780  72@H12   5779  72@O12  |  63.99'''

f = re.compile(
    '(^\|[^|]+?[ \t](\S+?)@\S+[ \t]+?'
    '\|[^|]+?[ \t](\\2)@\S+.+)',
    re.MULTILINE)\
    .finditer

print [m.group(1) for m in f(su)]
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