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Is there a way to determine whether or not a given .Net Type is a number? For example: System.UInt32/UInt16/Double are all numbers. I want to avoid a long switch-case on the Type.FullName.

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3  
Dupe of many, many, many. Why hasn't this been closed yet? –  Noldorin Nov 17 '09 at 16:40
1  
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1130698 and very close to some others. –  Henk Holterman Nov 17 '09 at 18:22
    
possible duplicate of Using .Net, how can I determine if a type is a Numeric ValueType? –  nawfal Dec 26 '13 at 15:38

11 Answers 11

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Try this:

Type type = object.GetType();
bool isNumber = (type.IsPrimitiveImple && type != typeof(bool) && type != typeof(char));

The primitive types are Boolean, Byte, SByte, Int16, UInt16, Int32, UInt32, Int64, UInt64, Char, Double,and Single.

Taking Guillaume's solution a little further:

public static bool IsNumericType(this object o)
{   
  switch (Type.GetTypeCode(o.GetType()))
  {
    case TypeCode.Byte:
    case TypeCode.SByte:
    case TypeCode.UInt16:
    case TypeCode.UInt32:
    case TypeCode.UInt64:
    case TypeCode.Int16:
    case TypeCode.Int32:
    case TypeCode.Int64:
    case TypeCode.Decimal:
    case TypeCode.Double:
    case TypeCode.Single:
      return true;
    default:
      return false;
  }
}

Usage:

int i = 32;
i.IsNumericType(); // True

string s = "Hello World";
s.IsNumericType(); // False
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1  
So the decimal type isn't numeric? –  LukeH Nov 17 '09 at 16:25
    
The primitive types are Boolean, Byte, SByte, Int16, UInt16, Int32, UInt32, Int64, UInt64, IntPtr, UIntPtr, Char, Double, and Single. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Nov 17 '09 at 16:25
    
@Luke - good question. It's a struct - so you need to define numeric. –  Philip Wallace Nov 17 '09 at 16:27
    
@Luke my fault, I knew it was mapped to something, forgot it was float. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Nov 17 '09 at 16:31
    
@Xaero: I have no doubt that decimal is numeric. Just because it isn't a primitive doesn't mean that it's not numeric. Your code needs to account for this. –  LukeH Nov 17 '09 at 16:33

Don't use a switch - just use a set:

HashSet<Type> NumericTypes = new HashSet<Type>
{
    typeof(decimal), typeof(byte), typeof(sbyte),
    typeof(short), typeof(ushort), ...
};

EDIT: One advantage of this over using a type code is that when new numeric types are introduced into .NET (e.g. BigInteger and Complex) it's easy to adjust - whereas those types won't get a type code.

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3  
and how you would use the HashSet? –  RvdK Nov 17 '09 at 16:21
6  
NumericTypes.Contains(whatever)? –  mquander Nov 17 '09 at 16:23
2  
bool isANumber = NumericTypes.Contains(classInstance.GetType()); –  Yuriy Faktorovich Nov 17 '09 at 16:23
    
Would have thought the compiler would do an implicit convertion of the switch-statement to hashset. –  Rolf Kristensen Aug 5 '13 at 15:02
    
@RolfKristensen: Well switch simply doesn't work on Type, so you can't. You can switch on TypeCode of course, but that's a different matter. –  Jon Skeet Aug 5 '13 at 15:06

None of the solutions takes Nullable into account.

I modified Jon Skeet's solution a bit:

    private static HashSet<Type> NumericTypes = new HashSet<Type>
    {
        typeof(int),
        typeof(uint),
        typeof(double),
        typeof(decimal),
        ...
    };

    internal static bool IsNumericType(Type type)
    {
        return NumericTypes.Contains(type) ||
               NumericTypes.Contains(Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type));
    }

I know I could just add the nullables itself to my HashSet. But this solution avoid the danger of forgetting to add a specific Nullable to your list.

    private static HashSet<Type> NumericTypes = new HashSet<Type>
    {
        typeof(int),
        typeof(int?),
        ...
    };
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1  
Is a nullable type really numeric? Null is not a number, to my knowledge. –  IllidanS4 May 28 at 23:29
    
That depends on what you want to achieve. In my case I needed to include nullables, too. But I also could think of situations where this is not a desired behaviour. –  SchlaWiener May 29 at 5:23
public static bool IsNumericType(Type type)
{
  switch (Type.GetTypeCode(type))
  {
    case TypeCode.Byte:
    case TypeCode.SByte:
    case TypeCode.UInt16:
    case TypeCode.UInt32:
    case TypeCode.UInt64:
    case TypeCode.Int16:
    case TypeCode.Int32:
    case TypeCode.Int64:
    case TypeCode.Decimal:
    case TypeCode.Double:
    case TypeCode.Single:
      return true;
    default:
      return false;
  }
}

And if you really want to optimize it (loosing readability and some safety...):

public static bool IsNumericType(Type type)
{
  TypeCode typeCode = Type.GetTypeCode(type);
  //The TypeCode of numerical types are between SByte (5) and Decimal (15).
  return (int)typeCode >= 5 && (int)typeCode <= 15;
}
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Approach based on Philip's proposal, enhanced with SFun28's inner type check for Nullable types:

public static class IsNumericType
{
    public static bool IsNumeric(this Type type)
    {
        switch (Type.GetTypeCode(type))
        {
            case TypeCode.Byte:
            case TypeCode.SByte:
            case TypeCode.UInt16:
            case TypeCode.UInt32:
            case TypeCode.UInt64:
            case TypeCode.Int16:
            case TypeCode.Int32:
            case TypeCode.Int64:
            case TypeCode.Decimal:
            case TypeCode.Double:
            case TypeCode.Single:
                return true;
            case TypeCode.Object:
                if (type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
                {
                    return Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type).IsNumeric();
                    //return IsNumeric(Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type));
                }
                return false;
            default:
                return false;
        }
    }
}

Why this? I had to check if a given Type type is a numeric type, and not if an arbitrary object o is numeric.

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You could use Type.IsPrimitive and then sort out the Boolean and Char types, something like this:

bool IsNumeric(Type type)
{
    return type.IsPrimitive && type!=typeof(char) && type!=typeof(bool);
}

EDIT: You may want to exclude the IntPtr and UIntPtr types as well, if you don't consider them to be numeric.

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I know, I updated the answer while you were commenting. –  Konamiman Nov 17 '09 at 16:24
1  
So the decimal type isn't numeric? –  LukeH Nov 17 '09 at 16:25
    
Ooops... well, it seems that Guillaume's solution is the best after all. –  Konamiman Nov 17 '09 at 17:49

try this one line of code:

return type != null && "Byte,Decimal,Double,Int16,Int32,Int64, SByte,Single,UInt16,UInt32,UInt64,".Contains(type.Name + ",");
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Unfortunately these types don't have much in common other than they are all value types. But to avoid a long switch-case you could just define a readonly list with all these types and then just check if the given type is inside the list.

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Short answer: No.

Longer Answer: Nope.

The fact is that many different types in C# can contain numeric data. Unless you know what to expect (Int, Double, etc) you need to use the "long" case statement.

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They are all value types (except for bool and maybe enum). So you could simply use:

bool IsNumberic(object o)
{
    return (o is System.ValueType && !(o is System.Boolean) && !(o is System.Enum))
}
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1  
This will return true for any user-defined struct... I don't think that's what you want. –  Dan Tao Nov 17 '09 at 16:57
1  
You are correct. Built-in numeric types are structs as well. So better go with Primitive comparison then. –  MandoMando Nov 17 '09 at 17:54

oops! Misread the question! Personally, would roll with Skeet's.


hrm, sounds like you want to DoSomething on Type of your data. What you could do is the following

public class MyClass
{
    private readonly Dictionary<Type, Func<SomeResult, object>> _map = 
        new Dictionary<Type, Func<SomeResult, object>> ();

    public MyClass ()
    {
        _map.Add (typeof (int), o => return SomeTypeSafeMethod ((int)(o)));
    }

    public SomeResult DoSomething<T>(T numericValue)
    {
        Type valueType = typeof (T);
        if (!_map.Contains (valueType))
        {
            throw new NotSupportedException (
                string.Format (
                "Does not support Type [{0}].", valueType.Name));
        }
        SomeResult result = _map[valueType] (numericValue);
        return result;
    }
}
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