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I've read all the documentation about element.children, (for example MDN), and yet I can't get it to work properly on google Chrome. The segment of code I'm working with:

<html><head>
    <script src="loadxmldoc.js"></script>
</head>
<body><script>
xmlDoc=loadXMLDoc("books.xml");

    document.write("<table border='1'>");
    var x=xmlDoc.getElementsByTagName("day");
    for (var i=0;i<x.length;i++){
    document.write("<td><table border='1'>");
    document.write("<tr><td>" + x[i].getAttribute("id") + "</td></tr>");

        var y=xmlDoc.getElementsByTagName("time");

        for (var j=0;j<y.length;j++){
            document.write("<tr><td><table border='1'>");
            document.write("<tr><td>Location: " + y[j].getAttribute("id") + ": ");
            document.write("</table></td></tr>");
    }
    document.write("</table></td>");
}
document.write("</table>");
</script></body></html>

Problem is, getElementsByTagName makes y.length 16 every time, instead of 3,3,3,3,1. I did use childNodes, but that included text elements. I used var y=x.item(i).children; but it does not work on Chrome. It does work on FF, which leads me to believe that either Chrome doesn't support it, or I'm missing something in the head. However, all documentation I've found says that this should work with Chrome.

Is this the correct usage of .children or is something wrong with Chrome?

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4  
var y = x[i].getElementsByTagName("time");, and document.write is never ever ever .... ever, the right way to manipulate the DOM. –  adeneo Jul 6 '13 at 6:19
1  
Like @adeneo said, dont use document.write. Do something like, document.getElementById("container").appendChild(document.createElement("tr")) –  sissonb Jul 6 '13 at 6:23
    
I was following the code here. At any rate, I'm trying to get rid of the former before fixing the later. –  fat_flying_pigs Jul 6 '13 at 6:28
2  
@fat_flying_pigs You should see this. –  Shikiryu Jul 6 '13 at 6:37
1  
FYI, the reason why .item works in FF is that FF returns an HTMLCollection while Chrome returns a NodeList. –  Felix Kling Jul 6 '13 at 7:29

3 Answers 3

On my Chrome version 27 the following works just fine :

[].forEach.call (document.body.children, function (e) { console.log (e); });

As it does on Firefox 16

Try it on http://jsfiddle.net/jstoolsmith/3rBTF/

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'd like to thank @Felix Kling for helping me with the answer.

FYI, the reason why .item works in FF is that FF returns an HTMLCollection while Chrome returns a NodeList. –Felix Kling

.children only works with HTMLCollection. NodeList need to be done manually. I picked out the element nodes and threw them into an array.

var x=xmlDoc.getElementsByTagName("day");
if(isFirefox){   //alternately, you can detect if HTMLCollection
    var y=x.item(i).children;
    document.write(y.length);
}
if(isChrome){    //alternately, you can detect if NodeList
    var y = new Array();
    var currentChild = x.item(i).firstChild;

    while(currentChild!=null){
        if(currentChild.nodeType == Node.ELEMENT_NODE){
            y[y.length]=currentChild;
        }
        currentChild=currentChild.nextSibling;
    }
}
for (var j=0;j<y.length;j++){
    /* loop */
}
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Try childNodes, a standard property. children property may not work in all browsers.

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