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So I'm fairly new to programming and I started C about 3 days ago. I was creating this short program to test myself. It's just an extremely basic C program asking for your first and last name. Here is the code:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() 
{

    char first[20];

    char last[20];

    printf("Please enter your first name:");
    scanf("%s",&first);
    printf("\nand Please enter your last name:");
    scanf("%s",&last);
    printf("Greetings fellow %s %s!\n",first,last);
    return(0);
}

But when I go to compile I get this error every single time:

checkname.c:9: warning: format ‘%s’ expects type ‘char *’, but argument 2 has type ‘char (*)[20]’ checkname.c:11: warning: format ‘%s’ expects type ‘char *’, but argument 2 has type ‘char (*)[20]’

I know I can use gets() except apparently it's bad and I shouldn't use it. What is wrong with this code? I don't understand what the problem is.

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I'd leave out those spaces in the include brackets. –  chris Jul 6 '13 at 6:34
    
Don't forget a newline \n at end of each printf format string, or at least call fflush! –  Basile Starynkevitch Jul 6 '13 at 6:35
    
Yea sorry when i post the code it made the header files disappear with the brakcets. Probably for html5 or something. –  Justin Leung Jul 6 '13 at 6:38
3  
@scott_fakename: you are wrong, declaring char*first; will give undefined behavior (and a probable crash) unless you fill first with some memory zone (either the address of an array, or some malloc) –  Basile Starynkevitch Jul 6 '13 at 6:42
1  
gets is bad, but fgets isn't. –  Jim Balter Jul 6 '13 at 6:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I know I can use gets() except apparently it's bad and I shouldn't use it.

Exactly, exactly - it's prone to buffer overflow errors. And scanf() is equally evil (partially for the same reason - it's not trivial to specify the buffer length, and anyways, it's way more complex than necessary, it's hard to get it right, and it's superfluously expensive for simple raw I/O), don't use it either. Use fgets() for acquiring user input, it saves your from being shot in the foot by letting you pass it the length of the buffer to be written to:

char buf[0x40];
fgets(buf, sizeof(buf), stdin);

Now that you know the "how", I'll explain to you the "why".

Arrays, when passed to functions, are said to decay into pointers. If you pass a char [] to a function, it will see that as a char * that points to the first element to the array. That's why you don't have to explicitly use the "addressof" (&) operator for a (char) array (which is conceptually a string in C).

If you use it, you don't get a pointer to the first element of the array, but a pointer to the array itself, and that's not what you want.

(In general, it could work, as it apparently did for you, but in theory it invokes undefined behavior because the actual type of the expression passed in and the type expected by the %s conversion specifier don't match.)

This document is a good read about arrays and pointers, make sure to read and understand it.

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By buffer overflow errors do you mean say I ask for someone to enter there first and last name but instead they enter huge lines of string like 1 million characters resulting in the program crashing or breaking. –  Justin Leung Jul 6 '13 at 6:59
    
@JustinLeung Yes, I do. That can be prevented by using functions that bound the length of the string read. –  user529758 Jul 6 '13 at 7:05

You are using array. Dont use & with scanf while input to array

e.g: scanf("%s",first);

Arrays are already passed by reference. You don't need to put & as array is already passed as a pointer to the first element in C

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1  
I understand it know thanks! –  Justin Leung Jul 6 '13 at 6:40
    
Welcome - Please accept the answer by Clicking on "Tick" Sign that's left of my answer under votes. @JustinLeung –  Shumail Mohy-ud-Din Jul 6 '13 at 6:41
    
Sure, sorry this is my first time on this website. –  Justin Leung Jul 6 '13 at 6:46
2  
The term "passed by reference" doesn't exist in C. Also, the array isn't "passed as a pointer", it is a pointer! The type of first is a 'char*', and that is why he does not need to add the '&' –  Itsik Jul 6 '13 at 6:47
    
@Itsik Huh, what? The array is not a pointer! Read this. –  user529758 Jul 6 '13 at 8:39

Try changing scanf("%s",&first); to scanf("%s",first); (and similarity for last).

Under normal circumstances (including these) the name of an array evaluates to the address of the first element in the array. In this case, that's a pointer to char, which is the type scanf expects for a %s conversion.

With the & on the beginning, you get the same pointer value (i.e., the same address), but as a pointer to an array instead of a pointer to the element of the array. Since this doesn't match the type expected by %s, the result is undefined behavior (though since it's the right address, this will usually work with most typical compilers/CPUs).

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Is there a reason why you get rid of the & for scanf("%s",&first); Because Ive been doing that since I started programming and its worked for me. –  Justin Leung Jul 6 '13 at 6:36
    
Maybe explaining the reason would be good. –  user529758 Jul 6 '13 at 6:36
    
@JustinLeung Yes, there is. Arrays, when passed to functions, decay into pointers. If you pass a char [] to a function, it will see that as a char *, which points to the first element to the array. That's why you don't have to explicitly use the "addressof" (&) operator for a char array (which is conceptually a string in C). If you use it, you don't get a pointer to the first element of the array, but a pointer to the array itself, and that's not what you want. (In general, it could work, but in theory it invokes undefined behavior because the actual and the specified types don't match.) –  user529758 Jul 6 '13 at 6:39
    
Oh thanks that clears it up. I haven't gotten to the array part yet in the book I'm learning C from. The example code they give me in the book uses gets() but I wanted use scanf instead. Thats probably the reason why I didn't understand. –  Justin Leung Jul 6 '13 at 6:43
    
@JustinLeung Have a look at my answer, I've got a somewhat more detailed explanation, a better solution and a link for you. –  user529758 Jul 6 '13 at 6:44

Remove the & from the scanf statements.

scanf("%s", first);  // first is pointer to start of first
scanf("%s", last);   // last is pointer to start of last 

In C the name of an array is a pointer to the start of the array.

After the format parameter scanf requires pointer argument or arguments.

scanf(  "%s", first  );
scanf format-arg input-args

For example, if a integer parameter were being used for scanf, the & (take the address of) operator would be required.

int n;
scanf("%d", &n);    // &n is pointer to n
share|improve this answer

scanf need an address, however a char array [] is already an address and scanf doesnt need the reference sign & because the name itself is an address

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