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Maxmind provide a free ipv6 downloadable csv. They provide ip range blocks, but does anyone know how I can someones ipv6 ip and do a check within the blocks they provide?

Here is an example of a csv entry. I believe the headers are as follow:

start ip,end ip,start ip block, end ip block, ...

"2001:200::", "2001:200:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff", "42540528726795050063891204319802818560", "42540528806023212578155541913346768895", "JP", "Japan"

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I don't follow your question: what is "do a check within the blocks they provide". Do you just want to know whether an IP address falls within one of the blocks? If so, well, you have the start IP address and the end IP address so it's trivial to test if a certain IP address is between those bounds! –  Celada Jul 6 '13 at 13:39
    
For the maxmind ipv4 db, i can use a mysql inet_aton which converts the ip to numerical format. I can then use this value to see if it falls in a particular range. I want to know the equivalent for the ipv6... –  user984314 Jul 6 '13 at 20:54
    
If you are talking about MySQL, then there is no equivalent, because MySQL does not have a integer type big enough to fit an IPv6 address (its largest integer type is 64 bits). So you have to roll your own. You can store the IPv6 address either as text or as two 64-bit integers (low part and high part). –  Celada Jul 6 '13 at 21:01
    
Since IPv6 allocations made by LIRs should never be smaller than /64, you should be able to get away with using a 64-bit integer. –  Michael Hampton Jul 6 '13 at 23:32

2 Answers 2

Since you are using MySQL, you might want to import the IPv6 addresses into binary(16) columns. It should do the correct thing for comparisons, and MySQL 5.6 provides a INET6_ATON function that converts the string notation to binary.

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I have seen the inet_aton6, but it brings back an alphanumerical result. So how could i use this for comparison purposes? I understand the inet_aton works perfect for ipv4 as it returns an integer back. Just confused how i can compare an alphanumerical result? –  user984314 Jul 7 '13 at 14:40
    
INET6_ATON returns a binary string that can be converted to hex, which I assume is what you are referring to. You should be able to do comparison on the binary string. –  oschwald Jul 7 '13 at 19:36

You can get the IPV6 geolocation database and codes from IP2Location.com.

http://www.ip2location.com/free/ipv6

Not only they provide the free database, you also provide the sample codes in several programming languages.

Perl

use Net::IP;

sub ipv6tono {
      my $ipv6 = shift(@_);
      my $no = new Net::IP ($ipv6);
      return $no->intip();
}

PHP

function ip62long($ipv6){
    $ip_n = inet_pton($ipv6);
    $bits = 15;

    $ipv6long = 0;

    while($bits >= 0){
        $bin = sprintf("%08b",(ord($ip_n[$bits])));

        if($ipv6long){
            $ipv6long = $bin . $ipv6long;
        }
        else{
            $ipv6long = $bin;
        }
        $bits--;
    }
    return gmp_strval(gmp_init($ipv6long, 2), 10);
}

C#

private static BigInteger ConvertIPv6AddressToNumber(string ipAddress)
{
    byte[] addrBytes = System.Net.IPAddress.Parse(ipAddress).GetAddressBytes();
    if (System.BitConverter.IsLittleEndian)
    {
        System.Collections.Generic.List<byte> byteList = new System.Collections.Generic.List<byte>(addrBytes);
        byteList.Reverse();
        addrBytes = byteList.ToArray();
    }
    BigInteger final;
    BigInteger[] mybigint = new BigInteger[2];
    mybigint[0] = System.BitConverter.ToUInt64(addrBytes, 8);
    mybigint[1] = System.BitConverter.ToUInt64(addrBytes, 0);
    mybigint[0] = mybigint[0] << 64;
    final = mybigint[0] + mybigint[1];

    return final;
}
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