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This question follows this one: How to sort a 2D Matrix

In the previous question, OP was asking how to sort a matrix such as rows and columns are sorted (M[i][j] <= M[i+1][j] and M[i][j] <= M[i][j+1]). My answer was simply: sort it like a 1D array this way the rows are sorted and the columns too. Then I realized that solution was not the only one.

My question is: what algorithm could give us all the solutions for this problem? An obvious solution would be a backtracking algorithm but I'm sure we could do better...

Example of solutions for a same array:

0 0 1 2 
2 2 3 3 
3 5 5 6 
6 6 6 6 
7 7 9 9 

And:

0 2 3 6
0 2 5 6
1 3 5 6
2 3 6 6
7 7 9 9

And:

0 2 3 6
0 2 5 6
1 3 5 7
2 3 6 7
6 6 9 9

And:

0 2 3 6
0 2 5 6
1 3 5 7
2 3 6 9
6 6 7 9

Etc...

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2 Answers 2

It will be backtrack the most efficient solution for generation, however as there are many approaches to that I propose the following algorithm (it is in pseudo C++)

int mat[n][m] = {-1}; // initialize all cells with -1
int sortedArray[n * m]; // the sorted array of all numbers, increasing order

void generateAllSolutions(set<pair<int, int> > front, int depth) {
    if (depth == n * m) {
        printMatrix();
        return;
    }

    for (pair<int, int> cell : front) {
         mat[cell.first][cell.second] = sortedArray[depth];
         newFront = front;
         newFront.remove(cell);
         if (cell.first < n - 1 &&
              (cell.second == 0 || mat[cell.first + 1][cell.second - 1] != -1)) {
             newFront.add(<cell.first + 1, cell.second>);
         }
         if (cell.second < m - 1 &&
              (cell.first == 0 || mat[cell.first - 1][cell.second + 1] != -1))
             newFront.add(<cell.first, cell.second + 1>);
         }
         generateAllSolutions(newFront, depth + 1);
         mat[cell.first][cell.second] = -1; // backing the track
    }
}

void solve() {
   set<pair<int, int> > front = {<0, 0>}; // front initialized to upper left cell
   generateAllSolutions(front, 0);
}

What I am doing with that is keeping a 'front' of all the cells that are possible candidates for the next smallest number. These are basically all the cells that have their upper and left neighbours already filled in with smaller numbers.

Because the algorithm I propose can be optimised to use operations of the magnitude of the number of all cells in all solutions, this should be optimal possible solution performance-wise for your task.

I wonder if there is any clever solution if you aim only at counting all possible solutions (I can immediately device a solution of magnitude O(min(mn, nm))

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If the elements are all distinct then I believe you can count the solutions using the hook length formula, but I am not sure how to extend this to the case when you have duplicate entries. –  Peter de Rivaz Jul 6 '13 at 10:57

some pruning for improvement of backtracking algorithm:

Note that, for example in a 5*4 sorted matrix M,

M[0][0] is the minimum of all elements set S and M[4][3] is the maximum.

M[0][1] and M[1][0] is the two minimum in S - ({M[0][0]}∪{M[4][3]}), while

M[3][3] and M[4][2] is the two maximum in it.

there are only 2*2 cases.

Similarly, M[1][1] is the minimum and M[3][2] is the maximun in S - {M[0][0],M[4][3],M[0][1] , M[1][0],M[3][3] , M[4][2]}, which are certain.

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