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Take this code:

int issuecode(int i)
{
  return 2 * i;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  return issuecode(argc);
}

The way I understand it, if compiled as a C program, it will have undefined behaviour. I reason based on these standard quotes:

C99, 7.26 (or C11, 7.31)

The following names are grouped under individual headers for convenience. All external names described below are reserved no matter what headers are included by the program.

C99, 7.26.2 (or C11, 7.31.2)

Function names that begin with either is or to, and a lowercase letter may be added to the declarations in the <ctype.h> header.

C99, 7.1.3 (or C11, 7.1.3)

  1. Each header declares or defines all identifiers listed in its associated subclause, and optionally declares or defines identifiers listed in its associated future library directions subclause and identifiers which are always reserved either for any use or for use as file scope identifiers.

    [...]

    • All identifiers with external linkage in any of the following subclauses (including the future library directions) are always reserved for use as identifiers with external linkage.
  2. [...] If the program declares or defines an identifier in a context in which it is reserved (other than as allowed by 7.1.4), or defines a reserved identifier as a macro name, the behavior is undefined.

Based on the above, I believe the function name issuecode is actually reserved for use in <ctype.h>, and so the program technically has UB.

Question 0 (sanity check): Is my reading of the standard correct and the program's behaviour technically undefined?

Question 1: Will the program have UB if compiled as C++ code?

I believe the answer is "no," as from the following quotes, I'd say the "future library directions" of C are not part of the C++ standard library, but I am not really sure.

C++11, 21.7

  1. Tables 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, and 79 describe headers <cctype>, <cwctype>, <cstring>, <cwchar>, <cstdlib> (character conversions), and <cuchar>, respectively.

  2. The contents of these headers shall be the same as the Standard C Library headers <ctype.h>, <wctype.h>, <string.h>, <wchar.h>, and <stdlib.h> and the C Unicode TR header , respectively, with the following modifications:

None of the "following modifications" mentions the additional reserved identifiers. Table 74 is a taxative list of function names like isdigit and isalnum.

C++11, C.2

1. This subclause summarizes the contents of the C++ standard library included from the Standard C library. It also summarizes the explicit changes in definitions, declarations, or behavior from the Standard C library noted in other subclauses (17.6.1.2, 18.2, 21.7).

7. The C++ standard library provides 209 standard functions from the C library, as shown in Table 153.

Again, table 153 is a taxative list.

Question 2: Assuming I am wrong on question 1 and the program actually does have UB in C++ as well, would the following change affect this?

namespace foo {

  int issuecode(int i)
  {
    return 2 * i;
  }

}

using namespace foo;

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  return issuecode(argc);
}

Note: The standard quotes are taken from drafts N1256 (C99), N1570 (C11) and N3242 (C++11), which are the latest publically available drafts for the respective language versions.

share|improve this question
    
0. Checksum matches. 1. I think yes, the C++ standard library contains, as a subset all the C standard library (even the old, deprecated .h headers). 2. I think yes again, because you are now not in the std:: namespace. (The best would be to test this on a DS9K, though.) –  user529758 Jul 6 '13 at 15:58
1  
+1, but... seriously? A C++ program that contains a function whose name starts with is has UB? If so, I've been writing UB all the time... –  Andy Prowl Jul 6 '13 at 16:05
    
@AndyProwl Those were my thoughts exactly when I read that part of the C standard. That's why I asked this question anyway. And technically, it's just non-static global functions; all the more reason to use namespaces ;-) –  Angew Jul 7 '13 at 10:02
    
@H2CO3 I'd happily test it on DS9K. Would you happen to have one? ;-) –  Angew Jul 7 '13 at 19:21
1  
@Angew Too bad I don't... :( Seriously, an implementation in which all UBs lead to a crash would be very handy indeed. –  user529758 Jul 7 '13 at 19:24

2 Answers 2

C++11 17.6.1.2 Headers

172) The C standard library headers (Annex D.5) also define names within the global namespace, while the C ++ headers for C library facilities (17.6.1.2) may also define names within the global namespace.

In the C ++ standard library, however, the declarations (except for names which are defined as macros in C) are within namespace scope (3.3.6) of the namespace std. It is unspecified whether these names are first declared within the global namespace scope and are then injected into namespace std by explicit using-declarations (7.3.3).

So if you don't include <cctype> the behavior is well-defined. If you do, it is unspecified.

share|improve this answer
    
If C99 7.26 appliesto C++, it's independent of header inclusion (7.26 requires that). If it does not apply, there can't be UB in C++, because then <cctype> doesn't reserve those additional names. So in a way, the core of my question was whether C99 7.26 applies to C++. IOW, what "these names" (from your quote) are. I don't think the quote addresses this. –  Angew Jul 7 '13 at 19:32

The following names are grouped under individual headers for convenience. All external names described below are reserved no matter what headers are included by the program.

There is a predefined list of functions that are reserved, if your function does not conflict name wise there is no issue.

Function names that begin with either is or to, and a lowercase letter may be added to the declarations in the <ctype.h> header.

The operative term there is may be added to the <ctype.h> header. The "is or to" bit is just guidance on organization of declarations.

So there never really was undefined behavior there...

As for C++ I think this follows the same idea take for example:

namespace foo{
  int isupper ( int c );
}

#include <cctype>
using namespace foo;
int main(void){
    isupper(92);
}

That should produce a compiler error because your function collides name wise with the C function, but due to namespaceing this is easily fixable by either appending an std:: or a foo:: to the beginning of the call.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think you're right about there being a "predefined list of functions that are reserved." Most of 7.26 ("Future library directions") is in the same vein as the is or to prefix. E.g. "Macros that begin with E and a digit," "Typedef names beginning with int or uint and ending with _t." The clause would be almost pointless if these weren't normative, and would pretty much contradict its first paragraph. –  Angew Jul 7 '13 at 19:27
    
I find it unlikely that they would leave such a big UB hole in the specification, particularly not with such obvious verb functions where it would be highly likely that a developer might have a toFoo function, that would be silly. –  Mgetz Jul 8 '13 at 11:53
    
I agree it sounds a bit too big a heap of names to reserve. Maybe the intended meaning was "if the implementation adds such names, they are reserved even when the header is not included?" It doesn't read that way, but would perhaps make more sense... –  Angew Jul 9 '13 at 18:42
    
That would make the most sense to me too, if they intended to ban that namespace they would have mentioned that any non-library function with those names should be defined as _is and _to. –  Mgetz Jul 9 '13 at 19:16

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