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I wrote a litte function in Javascript that displays a random picture. The actual line returning the pics number looks like this:

num = Math.floor(Math.random() * RNDGALSIZE);

with RNDGALSIZE currently = 72.

however, i felt that some pictures are hit quite often while others didnt come for quite a time, so I wrote a loop to generate num some number of times, and record how many times each value of num appeared. Here is the result:

2, 1, 2, 1, 1, 3, 1, 2, 2, 2,    // num = 0 to 9
2, 1, 0, 1, 0, 2, 2, 1, 0, 1,    // num = 10 to 19
1, 2, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 1,    // num = 20 to 29
1, 0, 1, 2, 0, 2, 1, 0, 0, 0,    // num = 30 to 39
2, 2, 3, 3, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 3,    // num = 40 to 49
2, 1, 2, 1, 3, 2, 3, 2, 1, 1,    // num = 50 to 59
2, 1, 1, 0, 0, 2, 2, 1, 0, 1,    // num = 60 to 69
3, 1                             // num = 70 and 71

As you can see, no value appeared more than 3 times, and sixteen values did not occur at all. While some values might not occur, i think 16 is way to much. Is there anything wrong with my aproach?

Update:

A little Later:

4, 4, 3, 6, 5, 5, 3, 3, 2, 2,
2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 5, 3, 1, 4, 2,
4, 3, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 4, 4, 4,
2, 0, 5, 3, 0, 4, 2, 0, 2, 1,
2, 3, 4, 3, 2, 4, 3, 2, 0, 5,
4, 4, 4, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 1,
2, 2, 4, 2, 0, 3, 4, 2, 2, 1,
4, 1,

As you can see, while the 3 is hit 6 times, there still 7 zeroes in the array :/

share|improve this question
1  
are you sure RNDGALSIZE is 72 and not 4? –  go-oleg Jul 6 '13 at 16:01
1  
If it where 4, how would i get array[71] filled with 1?? –  rhavin Jul 6 '13 at 16:03
1  
@The point is, that if RNDGALSIZE would be 72, your randomized numbers should be between 0 and 71, now there are numbers between 0 and 3, and later 0 and 4. –  Teemu Jul 6 '13 at 16:15
1  
Post an SSCCE. If the problem is as fundamental as you make it to be, that should be rather easy. –  Joachim Sauer Jul 6 '13 at 16:18
1  
@rhavin I'm sorry for misunderstood your "array", now I get it. –  Teemu Jul 6 '13 at 16:28

3 Answers 3

(This is to elaborate on lossleader's answer.)

Let p[n][k] denote the probability, after n trials, that exactly k distinct values (out of 72) will have appeared. It's hard to give an exact closed-form expression, but we can compute it pretty easily using dynamic programming:

var p = [];

p[0] = [];
p[0][0] = 1; // after 0 trials, 100% chance that 0 values have appeared
for(var k = 1; k <= 72; ++k) {
    p[0][k] = 0
}

for(var n = 1; n < 1000; ++n) {
    p[n] = [];
    p[n][0] = 0;
    for(var k = 1; k < n && k <= 72; ++k) {
        p[n][k] = p[n-1][k] * k / 72 + p[n-1][k-1] * (72-k+1) / 72;
    }
    if(n <= 72) {
        p[n][n] = p[n-1][n-1] * (72-n+1) / 72;
    }
    for(var k = n + 1; k <= 72; ++k) {
        p[n][k] = 0;
    }
}

Given this, we can compute the probability that after n trials, we will still have at least z "zeroes" (values that haven't appeared even once):

function probabilityAfterNTrialsOfAtLeastZZeroes(n, z) {
    var ret = 0;
    for(var k = 0; k <= 72 - z; ++k) {
        ret += p[n][k];
    }
    return ret;
}

So the probability that after 91 trials, we still have 16 or more "zeroes" is probabilityAfterNTrialsOfAtLeastZZeroes(91, 16), i.e. 0.959, which is 96%. (It's actually slightly surprising that you had as few as you did: the probability of having 17 or more "zeroes" is 0.914, so the probability of having 16 or fewer is only 8.6%.)

Similarly, the probability that after 194 trials, we still have 7 or more "zeroes" is probabilityAfterNTrialsOfAtLeastZZeroes(194, 7), i.e. 0.179, which is 18%. So you'd generally expect fewer than 7 "zeroes" after 194 trials, but if you repeat the experiment many times, you'd expect 7-or-more "zeroes" almost every one in five times.

We can also compute the expected number of "zeroes" after n trials:

function expectedZeroesAfterNTrials(n) {
    var ret = 0;
    for(var z = 0; z <= 72; ++z) {
        ret += z * p[n][72-z];
    }
    return ret;
}

After 91 trials, we expect expectedZeroesAfterNTrials(91) "zeroes", i.e. 20.164, and after 194 trials, we expect 4.775 "zeroes".

share|improve this answer

Your numbers look pretty reasonable,

Math.pow((71/72),194)*72 // odds of missing a number ^ tries * number of slots
4.774719247726743

Since we can't get a fraction, it looks like you should have 5 instead of 7 "zeros" if we lived in a "deterministic random" world.

Instead you should just do a choose with no replace and then restart the pool at 0.

edit a quick and dirty 100 test count you can run from the jsconsole:

function do_test() { x = []; for (var i = 0 ; i < 72 ; i++) x.push(0); for (var j = 0; j < 194; j++) x[Math.floor(Math.random()*72)]++; count = 0; for (var i = 0 ; i < 72 ; i++) if (!x[i]) count++; return count;}


function do_tests(n) { y = []; for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) y.push(do_test()); return y;}

z = do_tests(100)

[5, 5, 3, 6, 4, 3, 2, 4, 3, 3, 4, 5, 2, 5, 5, 3, 7, 3, 3, 4, 6, 4, 7, 4, 3, 7, 6, 5, 8, 3, 3, 4, 5, 3, 3, 3, 8, 3, 4, 7, 8, 4, 6, 3, 4, 3, 4, 3, 2, 7, 6, 7, 7, 5, 3, 6, 1, 3, 6, 5, 3, 3, 5, 4, 4, 5, 3, 4, 6, 6, 4, 3, 3, 7, 4, 11, 6, 5, 9, 5, 3, 6, 7, 6, 9, 2, 1, 7, 3, 4, 4, 6, 6, 7, 7, 5, 2, 5, 9, 6]

j = 0; for (var i = 0; i < 100; i++) j+=z[i];

473 // so 4.73 zero slots was the average of this 100 runs...

share|improve this answer
    
I upvoted this earlier -- and I'm happy with my upvote, because this gives the right general idea -- but I'd like to note that this is not actually an exact formula for the expected number of zeroes, because the probability that one value is missed is not independent of the probability that another value is missed. –  ruakh Jul 6 '13 at 17:31
    
I've been considering this, but I don't think it would have much affect unless there were very few slots.. Still, to be sure I actually ran a test 100 times and got 4.85 as the average number of 0's.. –  lossleader Jul 6 '13 at 17:39
1  
Of course, if the question is "Is this a good random number generator?", then it's cheating to use it to compute the expectations. :-P But yes, you're right that the non-independence has little effect. I just computed the expected value after taking it into account (see my "answer"), and got 4.774719247726673, which matches your value to 12 places past the decimal. I didn't expect it to be that close! –  ruakh Jul 6 '13 at 18:14
    
Yes, I'm assuming chrome's optimizer doesn't have enough insight to identify such an equivalence and/or wouldn't share an algorithm bug with my brain. :) –  lossleader Jul 6 '13 at 18:37
up vote 0 down vote accepted

So, solution would be to keep track of how often a number was hit and in case the random-generator hits a number, that has been hit already to often, provide a number that has been ignored to often…

var minhit = Number.MAX_VALUE;
var maxhit = 1;
var index_min = 0;
for (i=0; i<RNDGALSIZE; i++)
{
  if (imgnum[i] < minhit)
  {
    minhit = imgnum[i];
  index_min = i;
  }
  else if (imgnum[i]>maxhit)
  {
    maxhit = imgnum[i];
  }
}
var num = Math.floor(Math.random() * RNDGALSIZE);
if (imgnum[num] == maxhit)
{
  num = index_min;
}
imgnum[num]++;

Result:

2, 2, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1,
2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1,
1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1,
1, 1, 
share|improve this answer
    
A better approach would be to populate an array with all values 0..71 (maybe two or three times each, so you don't get total uniqueness), then shuffle that array with a simple Fisher–Yates shuffle, and just iterate over that array to determine the order to present pictures in. –  ruakh Jul 6 '13 at 17:11

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