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I get warning signed/unsigned mismatch for the following code:

auto n = a.size();
for (auto i = 0; i < n; i++) {
}

The problem is that by assigning 0 to i it becomes int rather than size_t. So what is better:

size_t n = a.size();
for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++) {
}

or this:

auto n = a.size();
for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++) {
}

or maybe you have a better solution? I like the first one more because it is bit more consistent, it just uses size_t rather than both size_t and auto for the same purpose.

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2  
how about auto i = 0u? –  jalf Jul 8 '13 at 8:57
    
How about using an int if you need an index in your loop? Using an unsigned index can get nasty very quickly. E.g. i < n - 1 is wrong when i and n are unsigned. –  D Drmmr Apr 19 at 18:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 30 down vote accepted

A range based loop could be a cleaner solution:

for (const auto& i : a)
{

}

Here, i is a const reference to an element of container a.

Otherwise, if you need the index, or if you don't want to loop over the entire range, you can get the type with decltype(a.size()).

for (decltype(a.size()) i = 0; i < a.size(); ++i) {
}
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4  
1 problem with range based loop is that index isn't available –  RiaD Jul 6 '13 at 17:15
    
Yeah that is big problem actually, I don't want to manage the indexes separately. –  user2381422 Jul 6 '13 at 17:16
    
Thank you for this. I didn't know C++11 introduced range based loop. –  stepanbujnak Jul 6 '13 at 17:18
4  
decltype(n) i = 0 would be shorter and clearer, wouldn't it? –  delnan Jul 6 '13 at 17:22
1  
I don't know, but I'm upvoting - 4 more lame downvotes covered :) –  icepack Jul 6 '13 at 17:55

Depending on what you want to do inside the loop and the capabilities of your compiler, range-based for loop might be a better solution.

All of your presented solutions are not bad in most situations, with minor differences Your first solution is actually worse choice and that's exactly what your compiler tells you. Second solution is better but if you want to avoid directly defining types for simplicity or some future changes, you can do the following:

auto n = a.size();
for (decltype(n) i = 0; i < n; i++) {
}

This way you bind the i and n types to always match each other.

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If you used the correct literal, you'd be fine: 0U. auto sees a literal of type int, so that is the type of i. Add the U and it will see an unsigned int literal instead. Otherwise, you'd want to make use of decltype as others suggested, especially since sizeof(size_t) may be greater than sizeof(int) (it is on Windows, OS X, etc. if running in 64-bit long mode).

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2  
Is sizeof(0U) always sizeof(size_t) per the standard? –  Flexo Jul 6 '13 at 17:28
    
@Flexo: Post edited to reflect that and encourage acceptance of another answer. –  Chrono Kitsune Jul 6 '13 at 17:31
    
-1. The first half of this answer is wrong as Flexo says. And the second half basically says "do as the other answers say". If you want to "encourage acceptance of another answer", you can delete this one. –  interjay Jul 8 '13 at 9:02
    
+1. Just learned of auto i= 0U, and the caveat in using it. @ChronoKitsune and @Flexo show it is a valid but not optimal solution for OP. Cleaner than decltype(a.size()) i=0 in trivial code. –  Garrick Nov 16 '13 at 15:37

For discussion:

auto n = a.size();
for (auto i = n-n; i<n; ++i) {
}

Note that for types smaller than int, the substraction result widens to int (called integer promotion).

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Trying to be const-correct whenever possible, I usually write:

const auto n(a.size());
for (auto i = decltype(n){0}; i < n; ++i)
{
}

It isn't very concise, but it's clear that you want a variable initialized to 0 of n's type (and n is const).

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for(auto n = a.size(), i = 0; i != n; ++i) {
}

...is probably the cleanest solution if you need the to access the index, as well as the actual element.

Update:

for(auto n = a.size(), i = n*0; i != n; ++i) {
}

Would be a workaround for Richard Smiths comment, although it doesn't look that clean anymore.

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4  
This is not correct: in an auto declaration that declares multiple variables, the auto is deduced independently for each variable and the code is ill-formed if the deduced types are not the same. –  Richard Smith Jul 6 '13 at 21:46

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