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I went to 'refresh' my Java, only to realize that apparently I don't understand basic concepts! Here's a simple one I can't figure out:

public abstract class Robot {

    private String model = "NONAME";

    public Robot() {
        System.out.println("Making a generic " + model + " robot, type: " + this.getClass());
    }

    public String getModel() {
        return model;
    }
}

OK, and the subclass:

public class Terminator extends Robot {
    private String model;

    public Terminator(String model) {
        super();
        System.out.println("Making a " + model + " terminator, type: " + this.getClass());
        this.model = model;
    }
}

And then I run a simple example, expecting "T1000" to be printed:

    Robot r1 = new Terminator("T1000");
    System.out.println(r1.getModel());

No dice! "NONAME" is printed. Before that, I get this output from constructors:

  • Making a generic NONAME robot, type: class com.akarpov.tutorial.Terminator
  • Making a T1000 terminator, type: class com.akarpov.tutorial.Terminator

So, OK, I see that Java picks up the fact that runtime instance of my class is Terminator, which is what 'new' is told to make. And, obviously, the Terminator instance does keep the copy of the model == "T1000". But inspecting the r1 object in a debugger (IntelliJ) I see two variables named 'model', at different addresses (obviously), with different strings. And, obviously, as the output suggests, the getModel in the abstract class picks up the default value defined in the Robot class, not the one passed to the Terminator's constructor (and retained inside the object).

What is it I don't understand about abstract classes and inheritance, and how would I go about having a default value AND default behavior (i.e. getModel), which picks up the specific data (i.e. "T1000") in a subclass? Thanks! And my apologies if this has been aswered many times before - I looked but nothing jumped at me.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The issue you are having is that you are indeed creating two variables. Now, with the code you have in place, when you call r1.getModel() you will get the original base class model.

If you want to be able to set model from a subclass you have a few options. You can go the direction that you started by declaring a new String model, but you must then go on to override the getModel() method from the superclass so that your subclass will look to its own model instead of the superclass model.

public class Terminator extends Robot {
    private String model;

    public Terminator(String model) {
        super();
        System.out.println("Making a " + model + " terminator, type: " + this.getClass());
        this.model = model;
    }

    @Override
    public String getModel(){
    return model;
    }
}

Another option would be to create a public of protected setter method in the superclass for model.

public abstract class Robot{

    private String model = "NONAME";

    public Robot() {
        System.out.println("Making a generic " + model + " robot, type: " + this.getClass());
    }

    public String getModel() {
        return model;
    }

    protected void setModel(String str){
        this.model = str;
    }
}

And then you would just have your Terminator object call setModel(model) before it called getModel() and you would have the desired output.

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You are right, of course - this is what I've realized 2 minutes after posting. I've already accepted an answer, though, else I'd pick yours! –  alexakarpov Jul 6 '13 at 18:33

Your issue is with the private modifier... The model variable exists twice separately in the two classes. Private means only visible to that class. You may want to use a setter method.

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I figured it out 2 minutes after posting, when I went and talked to my spouse about it - the issue was not with private (I did try protected) but with the fact that I hid the model inside Robot by another model inside Terminator! Removing that variable from Terminator solved the case. –  alexakarpov Jul 6 '13 at 18:01
    
... come to think about it, you are more correct than I first thought - because I did in fact neglect the fact that privates are not inherited. –  alexakarpov Jul 6 '13 at 18:34

Oh gosh I got it right after posting. My mistake was in declaring another String model in the Terminator, which led to hiding the model in Robot -- hence the two copies. Removing it solved the problem. Argh!

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Just removing the variable declaration could not have solved the problem. You also need to add a String constructor to the base class, delegate to it from the subclass, and delete this.model = model in the subclass constructor. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 6 '13 at 18:01
    
I think you are correct in general - but the base class Robot had the model field initialized to "NONAME" by default in my case. So, if my understanding is correct, removing the model field from Terminator made superclass model to be the one and only - and that's the one 'model' in subclass resolved to. –  alexakarpov Jul 6 '13 at 18:06
1  
Private members are not inherited, so this would work only if you happen to have declared Terminator as a static nested class inside Robot. Or, of course, if you have raised the access level of model in the meantime. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 6 '13 at 18:11
    
In any case, that would be bad design: you ought to keep model private and provide a String constructor in the base class. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 6 '13 at 18:13
    
Yes, I agree. IIUC, the only reason my code works is because the model String is stored at the superclass instance -- and the getModel behavior (method) is also implemented in the superclass. –  alexakarpov Jul 6 '13 at 18:17

Let's walk through this line of code

Robot r1 = new Terminator("T1000");

So this calls the Terminator(String) constructor. The first thing the constructor does is call the superclass constructor explicitly. It would have done it automatically, but you've written super() explicitly and that's fine. The superclass constructor does 1 thing:

System.out.println("Making a generic " + model + " robot, type: " + this.getClass());

Ok, so it prints out "Making a generic NONAME robot, type: Terminator" because that is what the method sees. It has no local reference to any "model" variable, so it uses the instance variable defined within the Robot class. Then control is given back to the Terminator constructor, which proceeds to print out

System.out.println("Making a " + model + " terminator, type: " + this.getClass());

But this time it works how you expect because the model variable was passed by the class calling the method, so it shadows your instance variable. Therefore its value is "T1000". Hopefully that makes sense

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Yes, you are correct. That explains why in the Terminator constructor I see "T1000"; but my question was rather about having the abstract class with generic "getModel" behaviour somehow "share the state" with the subclass - which was not working due to me having assigned "T1000" to the subclass instance variable, while the superclass method could only see its own - separate - instance variable. Still, accepting your answer for pointing out local vs instance, which I have also missed! –  alexakarpov Jul 6 '13 at 18:13

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