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So I'm trying to write a simple script in AutoHotKey that will use NumLock (which I have mapped to the capslock in my registry) as a toggle to turn my directional keys into the numpad nab keys. My script is as follows:

GetKeyState, state, NumLock, T
if state = D
{
    Up::Numpad8
    Down::Numpad2
    Left::Numpad4
    Right::Numpad6
    Enter::Numpad5
}
if state = U
{
    $Up::Up
    $Down::Down
    $Left::Left
    $Right::Right
    $Enter::Enter
}
Return

However, I get an error saying Up is repeated in line 15. How do I tell AutoHotKey to return my keys to their original key designation? I tried leaving an "else" section blank as opposed to the "if state = U" section, but then the keys remain in their altered state when toggling again. I'm sure there is something simple I am missing.

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2  
Note, this is about programming. Related: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/187705/… –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jul 7 '13 at 7:37

2 Answers 2

Ah, here you go. You can't do it the way you are trying to do it. Since you can only map the key once in the script, put the if/or function inside the hotkey, like so:

GetKeyState, state, NumLock, T

up::
    if(state = D){
        send {Numpad8}
    }else{
        send {up}
    }
return
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I read in the documentation that $ stops the script from triggering the script again. If Up is set to up with "up::up" (which doesn't work but imagine it did), the key press would be recognized as up which would trigger up again and again in an endless cycle. The way to stop the script from triggering itself is with the $. Also, numpad::up wouldn't work because I want the directional buttons to return to their original state. I actually don't physically have a numberpad. The goal of the script is to emulate it. –  user2556942 Jul 6 '13 at 22:06
    
Uh, I edited my answer already. What I've just posted will work for you. –  BGM Jul 6 '13 at 22:08
    
Oh. Sorry, should have hit that refresh first. Thanks, that makes sense. I'll give it a go and report back tonight. –  user2556942 Jul 6 '13 at 22:13
    
Did it work for you? –  BGM Jul 24 '13 at 0:32

This is a simplified solution that uses the #If context.

The advantage of this is that you will not have to have If statements to remap a key back to itself in the Else statement. The key will retain its normal functionality if the condition is not true.

#If GetKeyState("NumLock", "P")
    Up::Numpad8
    Down::Numpad2
    Left::Numpad4
    Right::Numpad6
    Enter::Numpad5
#If
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