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I'm thinking along the lines of the virtual world representation in Hackers.

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Jurassic Park... two billion lines of code to look through to control the power? Well, I suppose that's about right if they're Agile. –  tsilb Oct 6 '08 at 23:51
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Lately I've seen commercials where the programmer is writing code as fast as he can type. He write lines of code from the BOTTOM of the screen UPWARDS! Who writes code starting at the last line of the program working towards the first line of the program. Also, programmers now videochat about dates while they type. –  Nosredna Jun 24 '09 at 19:16
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This is Unix... I know this. –  akway Jul 24 '09 at 22:28
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So much disaster would have been prevented if the idiots at Jurassic Park would have used locks that fail closed when the power is lost. I mean, really, what were they thinking? –  Brian Neal Jul 25 '09 at 16:38
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@tsilb: dennis nedry (at least in the movie) was anything but agile. In any sense. –  Adriano Varoli Piazza Sep 23 '09 at 15:41
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176 Answers

Definately Swordfish! 3D hacking? Come on! Programming/hacking is done by spinning 3D blocks around on a display? Come on! And all this while getting a blowjob from a hot chick...

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I liked Swordfish’s depiction of hacking. It wasn’t technically accurate (duh!) but it succeeded in conveying the play of frustrating and satisfactory emotions when certain things just don’t work versus just fall into place. I liked the 3D puzzle analogy as well. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 26 '10 at 18:10
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  1. The idea that governments and financial institutions don't audit their code to prevent the presence of back doors and the like in their software
  2. The idea that an iPod can be retrofitted in order to use it as part of a plot to hack into a bank
  3. The idea that encryption can be overcome by a single man sitting typing at a single computer in a small amount of time, while being held at gunpoint
  4. The idea that UNIX mainframes run 3D window / file managers and that these can be accessed remotely in full fidelity on an old Mac
  5. The idea that the security policies of a major organization would allow a password as simple as "god"
  6. The idea that someone in a management position which was not IT related would have enough rights that the compromise of her account (with the password god) would cause a serious security breach
  7. The idea that when a system administrator audits the activity of a system, he identifies logged in users by their password ("god wouldn't be up this late")
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"The idea that governments and financial institutions don't audit their code to prevent the presence of back doors and the like in their software" -- That's actual programming not pop culture perversion. See thedailywtf.com. –  Windows programmer Nov 28 '08 at 0:23
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#2 - With S3 drives and AutoRun, you could set up a virus or some other malware to install automatically when a device is connected. –  Andrew Scagnelli Jun 1 '09 at 17:08
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There's a 2001 Australian movie called The Bank where David Wenham plays a programmer hired to do market predictions or some crap. As he's working on his program, he complains that it's not running fast enough, so he calls up his mate from uni who gives him "a program" (on a 3.5" floppy). David takes it back to his work where his program is running: by this I mean thousands of lines of code are flashing by on the screen. When he puts the disk in, the lines of code go double-spaced and then merge together to run at twice the speed!

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I want one of those floppys –  Cesar Sep 23 '09 at 18:00
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  • IP Addresses in the form of 192.384.262.481
  • That Superman 3 Exploit where they funnel the fractions of cents of every transaction into an account. But in a positive sense, because that's now geek culture.
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But this is intentional. It's like starting a phone number with 555. It looks good to casual glances, but it won't result in some real world computer becoming a cracking target. –  Matthew Scouten Oct 8 '08 at 14:40
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True, but they could use a valid IP address for that. 192.168.14.83 or 10.28.115.210 also look good. –  Michael Stum Oct 8 '08 at 17:42
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And then we'd be on here complaining about how they're using LAN addresses pretending they're live internet addresses (the horror!) –  MDCore Oct 17 '08 at 14:14
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I am surprised that the IP addresses in US movies don't start with 555 –  Patrick Klug Feb 2 '09 at 12:54
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The superman 3/Office Space exploit was originally from real life. –  Darron Feb 5 '09 at 23:41
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Bladerunner.

Deckard is analyzing a photo of a bedroom.

He enhances... he enhances... and then, somehow, TURNS THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE PHOTOGRAPH to to reveal the snake lady around the corner sitting in a bathtub.

Ridiculous, even for science fiction.

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My geekness needs to add at this point 'Awesome Movie' though. –  johnc Feb 3 '09 at 10:07
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I dunno, they had self aware biological robots and your are complaining about photo enhancement software. Maybe it just looked like a photo, but was encoded with some kind of 3d representation of the locality where is was taken. –  James McMahon Mar 11 '09 at 14:24
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An opposite example- The most realistic representation of a computer and programming I've seen yet: The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya

sitting

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However, this is the same show where a girl plays a real-time strategy game by typing lines of code into thousands of popup command lines. –  Jimmy Feb 20 '10 at 3:47
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Yeah, but she's also a hyper-dimensional data entity. I'm sure she's quite capable of generating machine code in real-time. She was probably just emulating the client over telnet or something. –  tloflin May 10 '10 at 18:07
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I think in in the case of Nagato Yuki, it's an exception -en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuki_Nagato –  nevets1219 Jun 28 '10 at 22:29
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In one episode of the TV show Alias the tech guy is working on some kind of computer virus. His monitor is shown briefly while he is working on the "code" which in fact is not code at all but a Makefile.in produced by GNU automake.

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Proof that they should never actually show you what is on the screen. –  Brad Gilbert Oct 9 '08 at 20:48
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Every time people in a movie or TV show zoom in on a picture of someone's face, and discover important information reflected in the person's eye, I die inside.

(This has happened on CSI at least twice.)

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Well, back when we all had modems to AOL instead of broadband to the Internet, there was the old "I can hack into your computer, just by calling your home".

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OK not programming specifically, but applicable. In the classic 'Office Space', when Peter Gibbons is trying to shut down his computer so that he can get out of the office before the dreaded Lundberg can buttonhole him about working on the weekend, as we see his screen saving to disk the desktop looks like a Mac, but when the file save is complete, we see a DOS prompt!

Now I know Initech is a bad place to work, but what kind of insane boss makes you work on a computer like that?

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They're running MovieOS: tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/… –  Dour High Arch Oct 6 '08 at 20:07
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Has anyone seen Eagle Eye? I purchased it on a flight... I fell asleep half way through.. but a computer system interfacing with a crane? I'd imagine even in this day and age a crane is not hooked up to the internet....

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I've noticed something funny in how movies show brute force password cracking.

The movie Wargames is the most obvious example. When Joshua is trying to guess the password for launching missiles you see his progress on a screen.

The way brute force password cracking works in the movies is when you get the password partially right you get a message showing which characters you got right and which ones you need to keep guessing for. Its like playing Hangman!

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3D spinning logos -- especially in covert Government departments...

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The NSA has a whole 3d art team. Cant be a shadowy govt. organisation without some sweet logos –  Neil Aitken Feb 3 '09 at 13:25
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Stick with me: In the end of "The Departed" Matt Damon's character deletes DiCaprio's police records from the database.

Oh Noes! now there's no record that DiCaprio was ever working for the good guys! Not anywhere on backups or logfiles! Nowhere!

Ah! think of all the bloodshed that could have been avoided by a subpoena for the backup tapes.

Ruined an otherwise great movie for me.

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Backup tapes? What backup tapes? True at some places I've worked at. Also, even if there are backups, are they readable? One place I worked at did backups religiously, but never actually tested the tapes. So, maybe this isn't so far fetched ... –  PTBNL Sep 23 '09 at 20:47
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The fact that no matter how many characters a password is, you can apparently always type it with just 3 presses on the keyboard.

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Maybe the login code is taken from Lotus Notes. –  Rytmis May 12 '09 at 7:25
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I have to agree with Randall Munroe: Julia Stiles, age 12, in the PBS series Ghostwriter. It is awesome in the depth of its badness. Also: Julia Stiles, age 12.

The sound is terrible, but you can see it here.

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I watched Terminator again the other day, and suddenly I noticed the "terminator graphics" overlaid when the terminator is "scanning" the area is just a bunch of assembly code. Quite funny :)

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In every Law & Order episode that requires the detectives to talk to a computer operator, the operator is a nerd (which means skinny kid with glasses and rumpled clothing) and he is ALWAYS eating something. I guess he's too young for his metabolism to turn that food into fat yet...

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Add a Commodore 64 to that scene and you just drew a picture of me in 1985 –  JohnFx Apr 3 '09 at 22:11
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How about using a virus to blow up computers, as done in Transformers? And since when do computers contain material that can explode with such force?

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If I remember correctly, in Transformers the computers blow up in a huge fireball, completely destroying the room/building. That's a bit different from overheating the electronics. –  Rick May 18 '09 at 9:49
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Anyone remember Tron? Pretty well every computer term they used in that movie was misused or used in the wrong context. It's hilarious to watch. It's even funnier when you realize that they were trying to be serious.

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What are you talking about, I was sucked into a game of Tetris the other day! –  johnc Feb 3 '09 at 9:59
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Having just seen Wanted this past weekend (and do I ever wish I could have those two hours back):

We learn that the assassins' weaving loom passes the names of targets in binary.

All I could think was: Where do the character codes come from? ASCII? EBCDIC? Something else?

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that whole loom thing ruined that entire movie. Not that it was good movie without it... –  dotjoe Feb 23 '09 at 19:09
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It was ASCII, which explains why the assasins were having such a hard time tracking down G?nter Gr??senh??sen. –  JohnFx Sep 8 '09 at 23:19
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"The Jackal" with Bruce Willis; how he ridiculously rattled off the specs for his uber sniper rifle to a Packard Bell 386, and the damn thing understood every single word, without Dragon Naturally Speaking or anything.

I think he also pushes control or alt on his keyboard to start his guns up...

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Obligatory bash.org/?34776 –  tj111 Oct 8 '09 at 18:58
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A spy satellite can be positioned over a point of interest within seconds.

And it's a real-time video.

And the video is rock-steady. (In reality, these low-orbit satellites are whizzing by the ground at thousands of mph.)

And the video has incredibly high resolution.

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There was a terrible episode of NCIS where two "hackers" were hacking each other, consisting of fast camera swipes as they moved each other's windows back and forth.

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Wargames: The Dead Code. Nothing more needs to be said.

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4 8 15 16 23 42

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I am addicted to LOST, so I had to upvote this, even if it's off-topic. So and now for some Dharma snacks, maybe an Apollo. –  splattne Nov 7 '08 at 16:36
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My favorite: fast-scrolling listings with unrelated code which are used to signify virus upload, hack in progress, or something like this.

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In Anti-Trust, when the operating system developed by Ryan Fillipe is written in HTML.

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When a character who is supposedly some kind of super advanced computer programmer says something along the lines of "I speak binary," as if a computer programmer sits at the computer and types 0s and 1s all day.

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If I hadn't watched the new Knight Rider I would never have learned that "Every good programmer leaves a backdoor into their system."

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This is in War Games too I think. When he visits the older nerds about the computer he dialed. –  alex Feb 9 '10 at 0:41
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What? isn't this considered a best practice?? –  DMin May 3 '10 at 14:38
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