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Imagine a string like this:

field1,field2(subfield1),field3(subfield2,subfield3),field4(),field5(subfield4(subsubfield,subsubfield2))

I would like to get an array like this:

array(
    field1 => array(),
    field2 => array(subfield1),
    field3 => array(
        subfield2,
        subfield3
    ),
    field4 => array(),
    field5 => array(
        subfield4 => array(
            subsubfield => array(),
            subsubfield => array()
        )
    )
)

I have this regex [a-zA-Z0-9]*\([^()]*(?:(?R)[^()]*)*\) which does some of the work outputting:

array(
    field1,
    field2(subfield1),
    field3(subfield2,subfield3),
    field4(),
    field5(subfield4(subsubfield,subsubfield2))
)

Though this it not what I want. I'm kind of stuck now but the options I've come up with so far are:

  1. Do something with preg_replace_callback
  2. Write some kind of custom parser for these kinds of hierarchical comma separated string
  3. Quit, get drunk and crack this case tomorrow (ok, not an option, gotta do this now)

For what it's worth, I've got to loop through the fields and subfields anyway. I've got some code that uses the given regex and runs the same match against its values when required later on. I want to parse the whole string including its nested substring at once.

Does anyone know how I get started on this? Which option would be the best (or better) approach? (readability vs resource usage vs complexity vs etc)

share|improve this question
    
For what purpose you are defining your own data format? I would just use JSON data structure, so you can use the build in encoders/decoders. If you need to stick with this data structure I would write my own parser with a recursive function, which uses your regex. – Bram Gerritsen Jul 6 '13 at 22:48
    
Well, it's not really a data format. More of a super-slim, url based query format kind of like the Facebook Graph API. What in this example matters is that a 'field' can both be a static attribute of a resource, or a connection to another resource, with the queried attributes and/or connections for that resource. Other things built in will be 'filters', like limit:50,offset:0. All parsing into this array passed to my resource object. – Rebel Designer Jul 6 '13 at 23:21
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Introduction

The problem you describe cannot be represented by a regular language, because regular languages cannot balance parentheses. However, most regular expression implementations have had features added to them over the years that allow for parsing of languages more sophisticated than regular languages. In particular, this problem could be solved with either .NET's balanced matching, or PCRE's recursive expressions (thanks, @Gumbo, for pointing that out in the comments).

However, just because you can do a thing doesn't mean you should. The problem with using a regular expression for this kind of task is that as you extend your metalanguage, it will get exponentially more difficult to modify your regular expression. Whereas parsers tend to be much more plastic and easy to extend.

So you could probably construct a series of regular expressions to cover non-pathological cases of your input, but why even try when you could just write a parser? They're easy to maintain, extremely fast (faster than regular expressions), easy to extend, and a lot of fun to boot.

I originally missed that this question was looking for a PHP solution, so I wrote it in JavaScript. I translated that into PHP, and left the original JavaScript solution at the end of the post.

PHP Solution

function parse( $s ) {
    // we will always have a "current context".  the current context is the array we're
    // currently operating in.  when we start, this is simply an empty array.  as new
    // arrays are created, this context will change.
    $context = array();
    // since we have to keep track of how deep our context is, we keep a context stack
    $contextStack = array(&$context);
    // this accumulates the name of the current array
    $name = '';
    for( $i=0; $i<strlen($s); $i++ ) {
        switch( $s[$i] ) {
            case ',':
                // if the last array hasn't been added to the current context
                // (as will be the case for arrays lacking parens), we add it now
                if( $name!='' && !array_key_exists( $name, $context ) )
                    $context[$name] = array();
                // reset name accumulator
                $name = '';
                break;
            case '(':
                // we are entering a subcontext

                // save a new array in the current context; this will become our new context
                $context[$name] = array();
                // switch context and add to context stack
                $context = &$context[$name];
                $contextStack[] = &$context;
                // reset name accumulator
                $name = '';
                break;
            case ')':
                // we are exiting a context

                // if we haven't saved this array in the current context, do so now
                if( $name!='' && !array_key_exists( $name, $context ) )
                    $context[$name] = array();
                // we can't just assign $context the return value of array_pop because
                // that does not return a reference
                array_pop($contextStack);
                if( count($contextStack) == 0 ) throw new Exception( 'Unmatched parenthesis' );
                $context = &$contextStack[count($contextStack)-1];
                // reset name accumulator
                $name = '';
                break;
            default:
                // this is part of the field name
                $name .= $s[$i];
        }
    }
    // add any trailing arrays to the context (this will cover the case
    // where our input ends in an array without parents)
    if( $name!='' && !array_key_exists( $name, $context ) )
        $context[$name] = array();
    if( count( $contextStack ) != 1 ) throw new Exception( 'Unmatched parenthesis' );
    return array_pop( $contextStack );
}

Original JavaScript Solution

function parse(s) {
    var root = { parent: null, children: [] };
    var field = { parent: root, name: '', start_idx: 0, children: [] };
    root.children.push( field );
    for( var i=0; i<s.length; i++ ) {
        switch( s[i] ) {
            case ',':
                // if this field didn't have any children, we have to set its text
                if( !field.children.length )
                    field.text = s.substr( field.start_idx, i - field.start_idx + 1 );
                // start a new field; create new field and change context
                var newfield = { parent: field.parent, name: '', start_idx: i, children:[] };
                field.parent.children.push(newfield);
                field = newfield;
                break;
            case '(':
                // start of a subfield; create subfield and change context
                var subfield = { parent: field, name: '', start_idx: i, children:[] };
                field.children.push(subfield);
                field = subfield;
                break;
            case ')':
                // end of a subfield; fill out subfield details and change context
                if( !field.parent ) throw new Error( 'Unmatched parenthesis!' );
                field.text = s.substr( field.start_idx, i - field.start_idx + 1 );
                if( field.text==='()' ) {
                    // empty subfield; pop this subfield so it doesn't clutter the parent
                    field.parent.children.pop();
                }
                field = field.parent;
                break;
            default:
                // this is part of the field name
                field.name += s[i];
                field.name = field.name.trim();
        }
    }
    return root;
}

Now that we have a parsed tree of your language, we can pretty easily create some recursive code to emit your PHP:

function formatphp_namedarray(arr,indent,lastchild) {
    var php = indent + arr.name + ' => array(';
    if( arr.children.length ) {
        if( arr.children.length===1 && arr.children[0].length===0 ) {
            php += arr.children[0].name;
        } else {
            php += '\n';
            indent += '\t';
            for( var i=0; i<arr.children.length; i++ )
                php += formatphp_namedarray(arr.children[i],indent,i===arr.children.length-1);
            indent = indent.replace(/\t$/,'');
            php += indent;
        }
    }
    php += (lastchild?')':'),') + '\n';
    return php;
}

function formatphp(t) {
    var php = 'array(\n';
    for( var i=0; i<t.children.length; i++ )
        php += formatphp_namedarray( t.children[i], '\t', i===t.children.length-1 );
    php += ')'
    return php;
}       

See it all working here: http://jsfiddle.net/6bguY/1/

share|improve this answer
1  
Fairly similar to my (PHP) approach I guess. As you can see, Javascript is way more flexible. I especially like this line (no matter how simple it is): field.parent.children.push(newfield); – Rebel Designer Jul 7 '13 at 0:29
4  
PCRE, which PHP uses, does support recursive patterns as well. – Gumbo Jul 7 '13 at 17:35
    
Oooh, good one, @Gumbo! I wasn't aware of that. I'll update my answer accordingly. – Ethan Brown Jul 7 '13 at 17:46
    
Check my original regex, which uses a recursive pattern. Indeed wasn't really what I was looking for.. – Rebel Designer Jul 7 '13 at 19:49
    
Oh, indeed it does! I guess you guys are both ahead of me...I don't do much work with PHP. Thanks for the accept, and good luck with your project! – Ethan Brown Jul 7 '13 at 23:47

Ok I think this does the trick:

    $a = "field1,field2(subfield1),field3(subfield2,subfield3),field4(),field5(subfield4(subsubfield,subsubfield2,limit:50,offset:0))";
    $output = array();
    $outputStacktrace = array(&$output);
    $depth = 0;
    $buffer = $key = '';
    $m = memory_get_usage();
    for ($i = 0; $i < strlen($a); $i++)
        if ($a[$i] == ':') {
            $key = $buffer;
            $buffer = '';
        } elseif ($a[$i] == ',') {
            if (strlen($buffer))
                $outputStacktrace[$depth][$key ? $key : count($outputStacktrace[$depth])] = $buffer;
            $buffer = $key = '';
        } elseif ($a[$i] == '(') {
            $outputStacktrace[$depth][$buffer] = array();
            $outputStacktrace[$depth + 1] = &$outputStacktrace[$depth][$buffer];
            $depth++;
            $buffer = '';
        } elseif ($a[$i] == ')') {
            if (strlen($buffer))
                $outputStacktrace[$depth][$key ? $key : count($outputStacktrace[$depth])] = $buffer;
            $buffer = $key = '';
            unset($outputStacktrace[$depth]);
            $depth--;
        } else
            $buffer .= $a[$i];
    var_dump($output);

All whithin a single loop. Pretty happy with it. Comments are greatly appreciated!

Edit: including fixed variable names, fixed last non-nested character truncation, added 'special' query elements: limit & offset.

<?php
    $output = array();
    $outputStack = array(&$output);
    $depth = 0;
    $buffer = $key = '';
    $s = count($a);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $s; $i++)
        if ($a[$i] == ':') {
            $key = $buffer;
            $buffer = '';
        } elseif ($a[$i] == ',' || $a[$i] == ')' || $i == $s - 1) {
            if ($depth < 4) {
                if ($i == $s - 1)
                    $buffer .= $a[$i];

                if (strlen($buffer))
                    if (strlen($key))
                        if (($key == 'limit' || $key == 'offset') && ((int) $buffer) . "" == $buffer)
                            $outputStack[$depth][$key] = $buffer;
                        else
                            $outputStack[$depth]['filters'][$key] = $buffer;
                    else
                        $outputStack[$depth]['fields'][] = $buffer;
            }

            $buffer = $key = '';

            if ($a[$i] == ')') {
                array_pop($outputStack);
                $depth--;
            }
        } elseif ($a[$i] == '(') {
            if ($depth + 1 < 4) {
                $outputStack[$depth]['connections'][$buffer] = array('fields' => array('id'));
                $outputStack[$depth + 1] = &$outputStack[$depth]['connections'][$buffer];
            }
            $depth++;
            $buffer = '';
        } else
            $buffer .= $a[$i];
    unset($outputStack, $depth, $buffer, $key, $a, $i);
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice work, @Rebel Designer! The only quibble I have with your solution is that the naming is a little odd...for example, what does the context stack have to do with stack traces? Also, because the only context we'll ever need to access is the "shallowest" one, the use of a separate $depth variable is not necessary. See my updated answer for my take on the solution. Good job taking into account the filters; I didn't include that in my solution because the OP didn't indicate how they would be specified. – Ethan Brown Jul 7 '13 at 17:31
    
Very good point. I will correct this. The $depth is kind of (not of great significance) for my max depth limit (wasn't implemented yes in the code above), although I could do that with counting the stack. Check updated code for more additions I made. – Rebel Designer Jul 7 '13 at 19:37
    
Looks much cleaner; nice work, @Rebel Designer. +1 – Ethan Brown Jul 7 '13 at 20:21

Here’s a simple parser that solves your problem:

function parse($input) {    
    preg_match_all('/[,()]|[^,()]+/', $input, $tokens);
    // reference to current node list to work with during traversal
    $ref = &$output;
    // stack to remember node lists
    $stack = array();
    $output = array();
    foreach ($tokens[0] as $token) {
        switch ($token) {
        case '(':
            // push reference to current node list on the stack and
            // update reference
            $stack[] = &$ref;
            $ref = &$ref[$last];
            break;
        case ')':
            // restore previous node list from stack
            $ref = &$stack[count($stack)-1];
            array_pop($stack);
            if (is_null($ref)) echo "error";
            break;
        case ',':
            break;
        default:
            // insert token into current node list
            $ref[$token] = array();
            $last = $token;
            break;
        }
    }
    if (!empty($stack)) echo "error";
    return $ouput
}

$input = 'field1,field2(subfield1),field3(subfield2,subfield3),field4(),field5(subfield4(subsubfield,subsubfield2))';
var_dump(parse($input));

Note that this is just a simple parser that does not implement a complete finite state automaton of the described language, for example, the , after a ) must not be present.

But you could add some state mechanisms if you want to. Just make each case its own stage and check what previous states are allowed for entering a new state.

share|improve this answer

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