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I'm trying to get the HADDPS instruction to work and I can't seem to declare __256 in this code.

#include <xmmintrin.h>
#include <emmintrin.h>
#include <pmmintrin.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <iostream>

__m256 HADDPS(__m256 __X, __m256 __Y)
{
    return _mm256_hadd_ps (__X, __Y);
}
int main()
{
    //horizontal add packed single-------------------------------------------------
    __m256 HADDPSA = _mm_set_ps(4.0f, 3.0f, 2.0f, 1.0f);
    __m256 HADDPSB = _mm_set_ps(4.0f, 3.0f, 2.0f, 1.0f);
    __m256 HADDPSR = HADDPS(HADDPSA, HADDPSB);

    return 0;
}

I'm using g++ with -msse -msse2 -msse3 -msse4.

This is the error.

HADDPS.cpp|8|error: '__m256' does not name a type|
HADDPS.cpp||In function 'int main()':|
HADDPS.cpp|15|error: '__m256' was not declared in this scope|
HADDPS.cpp|15|error: expected ';' before 'HADDPSA'|
HADDPS.cpp|16|error: expected ';' before 'HADDPSB'|
HADDPS.cpp|17|error: expected ';' before 'HADDPSR'|
share|improve this question
    
Does it work if you add -mavx? –  Brian Cain Jul 7 '13 at 1:00
    
Well its a compiler error so I wouldn't expect -mavx to do much anyways, but no I tried to link with that flag and same errors. I guess mentioning -msse -msse2 -msse3 -msse4 was also pointless. –  user2555139 Jul 7 '13 at 1:04
    
No, don't try to link with it, try to compile with it. –  Brian Cain Jul 7 '13 at 1:07
1  
@user2555139 __m256 is an AVX datatype. It doesn't exist unless you enable -mavx. –  Mysticial Jul 7 '13 at 1:07
2  
Yes, you need <immintrin.h>. –  Mysticial Jul 7 '13 at 1:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have little mess here that starts right from the multiple inclusions that you have.

First your code is not clean C and it's not clean C++ either, it's a mix that can only give you an headache because you are not getting any benefit from this.

In case you really want to code in C++ you should add some extern "C" and remove the C headers involved, if you prefer C I suggest to remove that #include <iostream> and use gcc instead of g++ .

You are also including headers for multiple SSE sets at the same time, refer to this post for a cleaner approach.

In the end this is the source code for a program that tries to mimic the business logic that you are probably looking for

#include <pmmintrin.h>
#include <immintrin.h>

__m128 HADDPS(__m128 __X, __m128 __Y)
{
  return _mm_hadd_ps (__X, __Y);
}

int main()
{
  __m128 HADDPSA = _mm_set_ps(4.0f, 3.0f, 2.0f, 1.0f);
  __m128 HADDPSB = _mm_set_ps(4.0f, 3.0f, 2.0f, 1.0f);
  __m128 HADDPSR = HADDPS(HADDPSA, HADDPSB);

  return 0;
}

you should compile this with

gcc -msse3 main.c
share|improve this answer
    
Works great! thanks. I'll try this with extern C in a C++ program. –  user2555139 Jul 7 '13 at 2:21

Here is a an example that uses the __m256 data type of the original question. Compiles without error using gcc or g++ 4.8.1, or VS2012.

// gcc compile command line: gcc -mavx sample.c
// g++ compile command line: g++ -mavx sample.c
// VS2012 compile command line: cl sample.c

#include <intrin.h>

__m256 HADDPS(__m256 __X, __m256 __Y)
{
    return _mm256_hadd_ps (__X, __Y);
}
int main()
{
    //horizontal add packed single-------------------------------------------------
    __m256 HADDPSA = _mm256_set_ps(4.0f, 3.0f, 2.0f, 1.0f, 4.0f, 3.0f, 2.0f, 1.0f);
    __m256 HADDPSB = _mm256_set_ps(4.0f, 3.0f, 2.0f, 1.0f, 4.0f, 3.0f, 2.0f, 1.0f);
    __m256 HADDPSR = HADDPS(HADDPSA, HADDPSB);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't #include <intrin.h> a Microsoft thing though? I tried using that header with GCC and its not anywhere to be found. –  user2555139 Jul 7 '13 at 16:46
    
@user2555139 you should change the inclusion to x86intrin.h or immintrin.h but remember that AVX instructions are much less popular than SSE instructions. –  user2485710 Jul 7 '13 at 17:39
    
My gcc test was done with Windows + mingw so it is entirely possible gcc for linux doesn't support #include <intrin.h>. –  ScottD Jul 7 '13 at 18:34
    
Nor does cygwin contain <intrin.h>. I use cygwin on windows and those are the headers available to me. –  user2555139 Jul 7 '13 at 20:47

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