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Of these similar function definitions, what is optimal way to access arguments and why?

function DoStuff()
{
    return arguments[0] + arguments[1] + arguments[2];
}

function DoStuff(first, second, third)
{
    return first + second + third;
}

Does one allocate less memory than the other? Is one faster to access the parameter values than the other?

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3  
the performance of this kind of thing should not be your concern when doing javascript, whichever it is, it won't really matter in the end. –  falstro Nov 17 '09 at 18:43
2  
Related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1688580/… –  Crescent Fresh Nov 17 '09 at 18:45
    
The notion of being optimal is only defined in relation to some optimality criteria :) Optimal=best. In this case nobody seems to care about performance-optimal method, only about maintainability-optimal. –  Alexander Abramov Nov 17 '09 at 23:35
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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Here is my test:

    function Test1()
    {
        var start = new Date();
        for (var i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            DoStuff1(i, i + 1, i + 2);
        }
        var done = new Date();

        alert(done - start);
    }

    function Test2()
    {
        var start = new Date();
        for (var i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            DoStuff2(i, i + 1, i + 2);
        }
        var done = new Date();

        alert(done - start);
    }

    function DoStuff1()
    {
        var result = arguments[0] + arguments[1] + arguments[2];
    }

    function DoStuff2(first, second, third)
    {
        var result = first + second + third;
    }

Here are the results:

IE  	FF

Test1()
2355    402
2381    395
2368    392

Test2()
504 	6
507 	7
505 	7

I figured that test 2 would be faster but it's drastically faster. So, not only is it more readable but it's more efficient.

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2  
I wondered if anyone was going to answer the question asked. –  Nosredna Nov 17 '09 at 23:38
    
Is it IE8? It illustrates the point I wanted to make - javascript interpreters have radically different performance. And new engines come out all the time. –  Alexander Abramov Nov 17 '09 at 23:42
    
To put it into perspective, would you measure the time it takes to $(this) with jQuery for example? 2ms per invocation (IE case) could actually do a difference for library writers. –  Alexander Abramov Nov 17 '09 at 23:47
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Forget about performance in this case and go for readability. From that perspective, option (2) is much to be preferred -- though, I'd go for more descriptive names. ;-)

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1  
This isn't an answer to the question. Does one allocate less memory than the other? Is one faster to access the parameter values than the other? –  Crescent Fresh Nov 17 '09 at 18:57
2  
Yes. It does answer the question, though not all of the questions asked in the post. The optimal way to reference parameters is the most readable way. –  tvanfosson Nov 17 '09 at 19:07
1  
@Crescent Fresh -- I don't want to get in a big fight about this, but did you get the point of my answer. The memory foot print and speed considerations for this are so far below the importance of good naming and readability that it wouldn't matter if the less readable version was faster. –  tvanfosson Nov 17 '09 at 19:43
3  
@Crescent Fresh -- and other downvoters -- notice that the question is tagged "best practices". I have a hard time believing that people really feel that focusing on this micro-optimization is really more of a best practice than good naming and readability. –  tvanfosson Nov 17 '09 at 20:07
1  
He didn't ask what was most readable. –  Nosredna Nov 17 '09 at 23:37
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Referencing arguments[] anywhere in a function will significantly decrease performance on many browsers.

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1  
Heh, relative to what? –  Crescent Fresh Nov 18 '09 at 0:53
    
Heh, yeah, it'll decrease performance; whether the decrease is significant or not depends on your program. I would love to see a non-contrived example where it actually matters... –  Shog9 Nov 18 '09 at 4:14
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The second.

Using the second, you know based on the signature exactly what is expected when you call the method. It's also far easier for maintainability in the future.

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The performance difference should be fairly negligible between the two, however the readability of named parameters is a better practice. There are times when you cannot use named parameters and in those cases I typically use a big block of script to unpack arguments into named locals.

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