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I have a file like this:

This \word{is} some text.
This is some \word{more text}.
\word{This} is \word{yet} some more \word{text}.

I need to create a list of all of the text that appears between \word{ and the matching closing brace, }, e.g.:

is
more text
This
yet
text
  • The opening and closing braces always appear on the same line, never across multiple lines.
  • Other braces are present in the document, but none appear inside \word{}.

How can I print a list of all of the text appearing in \word{}?

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3  
What have you tried? What have you considered? Giving us context of what solutions you've attempted will usually help us figure out what sort of answer you're looking for. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jul 7 '13 at 6:50
1  
possible duplicate of How to find all words appearing between parenthesis? –  septi Jul 7 '13 at 7:02

10 Answers 10

up vote 7 down vote accepted

grep with PCRE capabilities will do the job:

grep -Po "(?<=\\word{)[^}]*(?=})" file

Live Demo: http://ideone.com/uzEzBF

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@Village: I have tried above grep command with your input { This \word{is} some text } and got is back. What output did you expect? –  anubhava Jul 11 '13 at 5:30
1  
+1 for the simplest solution of all. Though not sure if we need postive lookahead too. This should suffice "(?<=\\word{)[^}]+" but I'm no expert on regexes :) –  jaypal singh Jul 17 '13 at 14:31
1  
@JS웃: Thanks and agreed that grep -Po "(?<=\\word{)[^}]*" file should be sufficient. –  anubhava Jul 17 '13 at 14:33
    
I would be concerned that \word{is {this} ok?} would return is {this. If @Village isn't going to have to deal with nested brackets that's fine, but it's still a possible issue. What about the recursive regex (?<=\\word{)([^{}]*|(?1)*(?:{(?1)}?)*(?1)*)(?=})? By replacing the [^}] with a definition of an allowed capture group: "ok content is blank, characters other than '{}', or ok content, followed by {ok content}, followed by ok content", I think we cover everything. –  zebediah49 Jul 17 '13 at 15:36
    
@zebediah49: If nested brackets is a requirement I will be happy to put more complex regex in my answer. –  anubhava Jul 17 '13 at 15:51

It seems you're handling a TeX file... so why not use TeX to do this directly? Then you'll be sure there won't be any problems and side effects, e.g.,

\word {there's a space between \verb=\word= and the curly bracket}

this would still work! It will still work for multi-line stuff:

\word{this is
    a multiline stuff \emph{and you can even add more groupings in it,}
    it'll still work fine!}

In your (La)TeX preamble, just add:

\newwrite\file
\immediate\openout\file=output.txt

\def\word#1{\immediate\write\file{#1}}

or use \newcommand if you're using LaTeX and not plainTeX.

You can also put the \immediate\write\file{#1} inside your \word definition macro. If you don't have access to the \word macro (e.g., it's in a class or style file) you can:

\let\oldword\word
\def\word#1{\immediate\write\file{#1}\oldword{#1}}

Hope this helps!

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A pure solution without calling any external utilities:

while read -r x; do
  while [[ $x =~ \\word{([^}]+)} ]]; do
    echo ${BASH_REMATCH[1]}
    x=${x#*$BASH_REMATCH}
  done
done <infile

Input file:

$ cat infile
This \word{is} some text.
{This \word{is}}some text.
This is some \word{more text}.
\word{This} is \word{yet} some more \word{text}.

Output:

is
is
more text
This
yet
text

The trick is the -r option set in read built-in function. This will not treat \ as an escape character in the line read. Then it loops while the \word{...} pattern is found in the string. Then the internal matched string is printed and the input sting chomped.

For small files (1-2 MB) I would use this version as it uses very minimal resources. But for large files I suggest to use anubhava's - solution as it reads the file much more efficiently!

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Since not all versions of grep have PCRE, here is a solution using only extended regex.

grep -Eo "\\word{.+}" file_name | sed -e "s/\\word{//" -e "s/}//"

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This code gets confused if other { or } are present in the lines. –  Village Jul 11 '13 at 3:42
    
How so? What output did you get? –  user1613254 Jul 11 '13 at 5:56
$ cat testfile
This \word{is} some text.
This is some \word{more text}.
\word{This} is \word{yet} some more \word{text}.

$ awk '$0 ~ /\\word{[^}]*}/ { nelts = split($0, arr, /\\word{/); for (i=1; i <= nelts; i++) if (arr[i] ~ /^[^}]*}/) print substr(arr[i], 1, index(arr[i], "}") - 1); }' testfile
is
more text
This
yet
text

If there happened to be \word{\word{STRING}}, STRING would get printed. In other words, it works recursively. Sorry if that isn't what you wanted.

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Mixing grep and sed:

egrep -o '\\word\{[^\{\}]+\}' | sed 's/\\word{//;s/}//'

For fun, I have also made up a pure bash version:

while read -r l
do
    n=${#l}
    ll="${l#*\\word{}"
    while [ $n -ne ${#ll} ]
    do
        echo "${ll%%\}*}"
        n=${#ll}
        ll="${ll#*\\word{}"
    done
done

Not very clean, but it works on your example

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1  
I assume that your bash solution will not work. The read built-in will treat ` \ ` as an escape character, so l will not contain it. Use read -r instead! –  TrueY Jul 11 '13 at 12:33
    
@TrueY: I test my little script under Cygwin and it works fine like this. But you arre right so I edit my answer. thanks –  Bentoy13 Jul 11 '13 at 12:49
    
Hmmm... I also tried my answer on cygwin and I found the -r switch because it did not work for me. –  TrueY Jul 11 '13 at 12:55
    
@TrueY : indeed. I think the =~ interprets backslashes. The command echo $x placed before your inner while loop outputs the original line with backslashes. But without -r, it's not working. With mine it's ok as I am not using =~. –  Bentoy13 Jul 11 '13 at 13:09
    
If I use while read x; do echo "$x"; done <infile under cygwin I get the lines without \ , like This word{is} some text. (no \ ). –  TrueY Jul 11 '13 at 13:14

Code for GNU :

sed -nr ':b;s/(\\word\{[^}]+\})/\1\n/;s/.*\\word\{([^}]+)\}\n/\1\n/;T;P;D;tb' file

$ cat file
This \word{is} some text.
This is some \word{more text}.
\word{This} is \word{yet} some more \word{text}.
{\word{This} is \word{yet} {some} more \word{text}.}

$ sed -nr ':b;s/(\\word\{[^}]+\})/\1\n/;s/.*\\word\{([^}]+)\}\n/\1\n/;T;P;D;tb' file
is
more text
This
yet
text
This
yet
text
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awk was invented to do text processing:

$ awk 'sub(/.*\\word{/,"")' RS='}' file
is
more text
This
yet
text
is

$ cat file
This \word{is} some text.
This is some \word{more text}.
\word{This} is \word{yet} some more \word{text}.
{ This \word{is} some text }
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perl can helps too:

perl -nlE 'say "$_" for (m/\\word\{(.*?)\}/g);'  < tex.txt

for this input:

This{ \word{is}} some text.
This is some \word{more text}.
This is {some \word{aaa text}} This is {some \word{bbb text} This is some \word{ccc text}} This is some {\word{ddd text}}
{\word{This} is \word{yet} some more \word{text}.}

prints:

is
more text
aaa text
bbb text
ccc text
ddd text
This
yet
text
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With sed:

sed 's/.*\\word{\([^}]*\)}.*/\1/g' input.txt

The expression above deletes everything except what's inside the brackets. If it turns out in the future that you need to match across multiple lines, awk might be easier:

awk -F "\\word{" 'BEGIN { RS = "}" } { print $2 }' input.txt

This sets \word{ as the field-separator and } as the record-separator, implying that $2 refers to what's inside the brackets.

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