Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it not supposed for a friend function to be explicitly defined outside of a class ?
If so why can i declare a friend function inside a class definition just like any member function ?
What is this ?
Is it only OK with some operators such as < operator or is it applicable to all operators?
If it is applicable to all of them, Is there any disadvantage for doing this ?
Should it be avoided? If so why ?

class person 
{
public:
    bool operator<(int num)
    {
        return  x < num ? true : false ;
    }
    bool operator<(person& p)
    {
        return  x < p.x ? true : false ;
    }

    friend bool operator<(int num, person &p)
    {
        return  p.x < num ? true : false ;
    }

    void setX(int num)
    {
        x = num;
    }

private:
    int x;


};

Update:
I am not asking for choosing non-member operator overloading or member operator overloading.
What i want to know is that :
Why we are permitted to move the definition of friend methods inside our class definition?.
Is it not violating any things? If it is not, Why would we have friends in first place?
We could simply define overloads as member functions ( I know the limitations of member functions ) But i am saying knowing this, Why isn't compiler complaining that I haven't defined friend function outside a class definition since it doesn't need to be inside of it (because of the class parameter it has) So why are we allowed to define a friend function inside a class definition?

share|improve this question
    
If you are asking about the definition of the friend function, then you should change the title of your question to reflect that. –  juanchopanza Jul 7 '13 at 13:47
    
what should i write then? –  Hossein Jul 7 '13 at 13:52
    
You can do it because the standard explicitly allows it. As for the reason why the standard allows it -- my guess is that it was considered convenient enough to be worth it. –  Vaughn Cato Jul 7 '13 at 13:53
    
You can ask "why is it possible to place friend function definitions inside of a class definition?" –  juanchopanza Jul 7 '13 at 13:54

3 Answers 3

Because an operator which needs to know details of the right-hand side of the expression in which is used, if it must access private data of the type which resides on that side, it needs to be friend with that class.

If you are trying to compare an int with a Person, like in your example, choices are two:

  • or you provide an implicit conversion from Person to int so that < can use it without accessing any private field
  • or you declare the operator as friend of Person so that it can access x in the rhs of the comparison
share|improve this answer
1  
That would still be possible if only the friend declaration was inside the class definition, with the friend function definition kept outside of it. –  Nicola Musatti Jul 7 '13 at 13:34
    
Thanks, But i didn't why we use friends, I asked why we are permitted to move the definition of friend methods inside our class definition. Is it not violating any things? If it is not, Why would we have friends in first place, We could simply define overloads as member functions ( I know the limitations of member functions ) but i am saying knowing this , why isn't compiler complaining that i haven't defined friend function outside a class definition since it doesnt need to be inside of it (because of the class parameter it has) –  Hossein Jul 7 '13 at 13:34
    
I suggest you to take a look here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4421706/operator-overloading/… –  Jack Jul 7 '13 at 13:36
    
@jack: I update the question –  Hossein Jul 7 '13 at 13:50
    
@Hossein obviously it is not "violating any things". Otherwise you couldn't even ask the question, because it wouldn't compile. –  juanchopanza Jul 7 '13 at 13:52

Is it not supposed for a friend function to be explicitly defined outside of a class ?

Friend functions can be defined inside class declarations. These functions are inline functions, and like member inline functions they behave as though they were defined immediately after all class members have been seen but before the class scope is closed (the end of the class declaration). Friend functions defined inside class declarations are not considered in the scope of the enclosing class; they are in file scope. quote

Is it only OK with some operators such as < operator or is it applicable to all operators?

It is best to try to avoid friend functions since they are oposite to what you are trying to do using private class scope and mainly "hide" the variables. If all your functions are friend functions then what is the use of having private varibles?

Still, there are some common operators which are often declared as friend functions, those are operator<< and operator>>

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much :) I am not trying to declare all of my needed functions as friends, I was curios to know why a friend function (which is solely used for operating overloading and nothing else) can be defined inside a class and why it is permitted –  Hossein Jul 7 '13 at 13:49
    
@Hossein the quote I gave you doesn't atually say "why it is permited" but explains why "it is not not permited". –  Alexandru Barbarosie Jul 7 '13 at 13:52
    
i know , but the part "Friend functions can be defined inside class declarations" , says we are premitted to do so, i understand that friend functions are not an answer for everything as you have also clearly mentioned , when i was saying that , i meant the quoted section which kinda cleared parts of my question –  Hossein Jul 7 '13 at 14:01

As Jack mentioned friend functions are required in places where access to private data is needed. There is also another purpose. This is related to types of inheritance. Only derived class and its friends can convert pointer to a private base to a derived type. So you might sometimes want to make some function a friend of derived class to allow this inside function body.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.