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In the Angular docs on directives, there is this paragraph:

However isolated scope creates a new problem: if a transcluded DOM is a child of the widget isolated scope then it will not be able to bind to anything. For this reason the transcluded scope is a child of the original scope, before the widget created an isolated scope for its local variables. This makes the transcluded and widget isolated scope siblings.

Can someone please explain why "if a transcluded DOM is a child of the widget isolated scope then it will not be able to bind to anything"?

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2 Answers 2

Imagine you have some markup like this:

<html ng-app="myApp">
  <body>
    <div ng-controller="myController">
      <div ng-repeat="item in items">
        <div my-widget>
          {{item.name}}
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

That sets up a tree of scopes ($rootScope -> controller scope -> ng-repeat scope -> widget scope). Now say your controller has some things in it:

function myController($scope) {
  $scope.items = [
    {name: 'Stella Artois'},
    {name: 'Red Stripe'}
  ];
}

You can read values from a scope any number of levels up, because they inherit from each other using prototypical inheritance. {{item}} doesn't exist in the widget scope, but it does in the parent ng-repeat scope, so it's found just fine.

If you use isolate scope, you get a brand new scope that doesn't inherit from anything. So if my-widget uses scope: {} for example, the scope tree looks more like:

$rootScope
└controller scope
  └ng-repeat scope
widget scope

Then in the double curlies, "item" is unknown. Using transclusion, you can set the scope up as a sibling like so:

$rootScope
└controller scope
  └ng-repeat scope
    └widget contents
widget scope
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Another subtlety that was mentioned in this talk is that if your transcluded content's scope is a child of the directive's, then the directive could clobber whatever variables the transcluded content was trying to reference in a parent scope. For example:

<body ng-controller="MainCtrl">
<my-directive>{{ name }}</my-directive>
</body>

JS:

app.controller("MainCtrl", function($scope) {
    $scope.name = 'foo';
});

app.directive("myDirective", function() {
    return {
        scope: {},
        transclude: true,
        template: '<span ng-transclude></span>',
        controller: function($scope) {
            $scope.name = 'bar';
        }
    }
});

Transclusion ensures that {{name}} in the directive references 'foo' instead of 'bar'.

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To me it makes far more sense to let it get clobbered. If I can clobber it without the transclude why would I suddenly want that behaviour changed just because I transcluded it? I probably tried to clobber it for a reason. –  George Reith Jul 8 '14 at 15:28
    
I think the assumption is that transclusion is used more for libraries and reusable components. You probably don't want to have to worry about namespace collisions with all the various libraries that you're using, and the transclusion takes care of that for you. –  hgcrpd Jul 10 '14 at 5:13

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