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A TitledPane features a title. Here is how a couple of them can look:

enter image description here

The titles are "More..", "Smileys" and "Send". I want to completely hide the Send title, not just remove the text "Send". The end result should be something like this:

enter image description here

Is it possible?

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Could you clarify : "I want to completely hide the Send title, not just remove the text." which "text" do you mean? –  Alexander Kirov Jul 7 '13 at 15:51
    
I did. Does it makes sense now? You see I can remove the arrow, as I already did. And if I nullify the title's text, the text will be removed too. But the title itself will linger on. So, I want to remove it completely and only be left with a content pane that is styled the way the Accordions TitledPane are. –  Martin Andersson Jul 7 '13 at 15:55
    
lol I even clarified the question even more with another picture. –  Martin Andersson Jul 7 '13 at 16:31
    
May be... try to use Node.lookupAll() method to find all nodes, which are titles of TitlePanes, and set to the Title-node "Send" maxHeight to be 0? And set focusTraversable to be false –  Alexander Kirov Jul 7 '13 at 16:40
2  
removing the title of a TitledPane is like removing the list of a ListView. Why would you want to do that? Why don't you just use another pane that is untitled, like StackPane? –  Sebastian Jul 8 '13 at 8:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would just use a standard Pane for the third content area rather than a TitledPane and apply the relevant styles to trick JavaFX into styling the bottom panel as if it was the content area of a TitlePane.

Roughly speaking you will require some FXML markup similar to this:

<VBox styleClass="titled-pane" 
      xmlns:fx="http://javafx.com/fxml/1"  
      xmlns="http://javafx.com/javafx/2.2" >
    <children>
        <TitledPane animated="false" text="untitled">
            <content>
                <AnchorPane minHeight="0.0" 
                            minWidth="0.0" 
                            prefHeight="180.0" 
                            prefWidth="200.0" />
            </content>
        </TitledPane>
        <TitledPane animated="false" text="untitled">
            <content>
                <AnchorPane id="Content" 
                            minHeight="0.0" 
                            minWidth="0.0" 
                            prefHeight="180.0" 
                            prefWidth="200.0" />
            </content>
        </TitledPane>
        <Pane prefHeight="200.0" prefWidth="200.0" styleClass="content">
            <children>
                <Button layoutX="74.0" 
                        layoutY="21.0" 
                        mnemonicParsing="false" 
                        text="Button" />
            </children>
        </Pane>
    </children>
</VBox>

This basically lays the three panes out in a VBox so that they stack correctly and applies some styles to tell JavaFX how to render the third Pane.

In order to achieve the correct look of the third Pane you will need to give it a style class of "content". This is the name of the background Pane that is part of the TitledPanes sub-structure and tells JavaFX to render the pane in the same way as the TitledPane control.

This will not work as it stands though as the actual css definition looks something like this:

.titled-pane .content { // styles defined here }

What this means is that the style will only apply to nodes that have a style class of "content" if they are also inside a node with a style class of "titled-pane".

The simple way to fix this is to give the root container Pane (the VBox in this case) a style class of "titled-pane", effectively tricking JavaFX into thinking the third pane is a titledPanes content area.

The output of this is shown below:

enter image description here

and with both TitledPanes collapsed:

enter image description here

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wow, your answer was exactly what I needed. I see you have succeeded in making the lower pane grow upwards if both two upper title panes are collapsed. For me that doesn't happen. And yet my elements too are wrapped in a VBox. My VBox in turn is the second child of a HBox. There are even more things up the tree, but things I cannot change nor think have/should have anything to say about why my application behavior differs from yours. So, when I collapse my two title panes, there is white space in between and my lower pane won't go anywhere. Do you have an idea why that might be? –  Martin Andersson Jul 9 '13 at 19:41
    
To be a bit more precise, my lower pane refuse to grow or expand beyond exactly 50 % of the total height of the VBox. The pane, so to speak, stay in the lower half. Imagine that it would be just like if your white space in the lower picture in your answer was put in between the second untitled title and the "hacked" pane instead of being at the bottom of the window as it is now. –  Martin Andersson Jul 9 '13 at 19:54
    
It's difficult to tell without seeing your actual layout. I've tried my example nested within a a HBox and I agree it does mess up the layout. I have played around with the preferred / max size values and the VGrow property of the three containers and the VBox to fix it but you will need to experiment to get it working for your exact scenario. –  Benjamin Gale Jul 9 '13 at 20:40
    
I kind of fixed the problem through binding the preferred height of my lower pane to all the height being available. However, the accordion wanted a preferred height that was equal to exactly three titles so there was still space left over. I consider this a bug and redesigned my application to use three titles to begin with. Anyways, thank you for everything! –  Martin Andersson Jul 12 '13 at 13:07

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