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I'm trying to write a merge sort program with pointers, and it is near to working good, but there is the problem that in the output there are some '0' instead of some of the numbers of the sorted array.

For testing the code you have to write a txt file prova.txt in which there is the array, one number for line. For example:

prova.txt:

4
7
2
9
1
45
87

When running the code, I expect the output

0: 1 
1: 2
2: 4 
3: 7 
4: 9 
5: 45 
6: 87

but I get

0: 1 
1: 0 
2: 0 
3: 0 
4: 0 
5: 0 
6: 2 

Moreover, are there any advice that you can give me for improving my code?

    #include <stdio.h>

int *merge(int left[], int right[], int n){
      int *ordinato, i=0, j=0;
      ordinato = malloc(sizeof(int)*n);
      while(i+j < n){
          if(left[i] < right[j]){
              *(ordinato+i+j) = left[i];
              i++;
          }else{
              *(ordinato+i+j) = right[j];
              j++;
          }
      }
      return ordinato;      
}

int *mergeSort(int *daOrd, int n){
      int k = 0, *left, *right, *ordinato;
      ordinato = malloc(sizeof(int)*n);
      left = malloc(sizeof(int)*(n/2));
      right = malloc(sizeof(int)*(n-(n/2)));
      if (n<2){
         ordinato = daOrd;     
      }else{
         for(k=0; k<n/2; k++)
             *(left + k) = *(daOrd + k);
         for(k=n/2; k<n; k++)
             *(right + k -(n/2)) = *(daOrd + k);

         left = mergeSort(left, n/2);
         right = mergeSort(right, n-(n/2));
         ordinato = merge(left, right, n);
      }      
      return ordinato;
}

main(){
     FILE *input;
     input = fopen("prova.txt", "r");
     if(!input) printf("Errore");

     int tot = 100000;//is the maximum n

     int *array;
     array = malloc(sizeof(int)*tot);
     int indice = 0;
     while(fscanf(input,"%d", (array + indice)) != EOF) indice++;

     int *ord = mergeSort(array, indice);

     int k;
     for(k=0; k<indice; k++) printf("%d: %d \n",k,  *(ord+k));


     getch();
     fclose(input);     
}
share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Oliver Charlesworth, Shog9 Jul 7 '13 at 17:14

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions concerning problems with code you've written must describe the specific problem — and include valid code to reproduce it — in the question itself. See SSCCE.org for guidance." – Oliver Charlesworth, Shog9
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
One advice for readability: Stop trying to write "cool" code. Always use braces, and rename daOrd to something like array, list, or base, and do not obfuscate left[k] as *(left + k). Also, you should not allocate memory (you allocate O(n²), although you only need n), and free it after use. –  phihag Jul 7 '13 at 15:51
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Asking people to spot errors in your code is not especially productive. You should use the debugger (or add print statements) to isolate the problem, by tracing the progress of your program, and comparing it to what you expect to happen. As soon as the two diverge, then you've found your problem. (And then if necessary, you should construct a minimal test-case.) –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 7 '13 at 16:00
    
thank you for your advice. This was the first or maybe the second question on this site, so I don't know this rules. I just would say that I already used debugger and print-statement, but I put them away because I'm italian and they wouldn't be useful for you, and the code is shorter. Moreover daOrd are 2 italian words, for this motivation I named the array like this. The next time should I rename before uploading the code here? Oli Charlesworth, where can I find something more about minimal test-case? Your link is for the SSCCE rules... thank you once again –  giacomotb Jul 7 '13 at 20:04
    
@OliCharlesworth This question already contains the whole code, although there are some minor omissions (see my answer). Additionally, it mentions how to set up the input text file in order to get the problematic input. As far as questions go in stating the complete code, this seems to be one of the better, if not the best ones. –  phihag Jul 7 '13 at 20:12
    
@phihag: "All the code" isn't the same as an SSCCE (unfortunately, the new close reasons no longer include "too localized"/"not a real question"). This is a pet peeve of mine, I dislike questions of the form "here is my code, it doesn't work, what is wrong?". –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 7 '13 at 20:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First of all, your program only compiles/links when you ignore errors. Add #include <stdlib.h> for malloc, and remove the getch invocation as it's not needed for this example. Also, your main function is 1. implicitely returning int and 2. missing that return.

Your program fails in the merge step - you don't consider what happens when one of the arrays runs out before the other. The current progam just keeps on reading and grabs whatever is behind the left or right array, which is most often a zero.

What you want is to compare only while neither left or right is exhausted, and then just add the remaining values, like this:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void merge(const int* left, const int* right, int* res, int n) {
    int i=0, j=0;
    while ((i < n/2) && (j < n - (n/2))) {
        if (left[i] < right[j]) {
            res[i+j] = left[i];
            i++;
        } else {
            res[i+j] = right[j];
            j++;
        }
    }
    while (i < n/2) {
        res[i+j] = left[i];
        i++;
    }
    while (j < n-(n/2)) {
        res[i+j] = right[j];
        j++;
    }

    return res;
}

void _mergeSort(int* values, int* aside, int n) {
    if (n < 2) {
        return;
    }
    _mergeSort(values, aside, n/2);
    _mergeSort(values+n/2, aside+n/2, n-(n/2));
    merge(values, values + n/2, aside, n);
    memcpy(values, aside, n * sizeof(int));
}

void mergeSort(int* values, int n) {
    int* aside = malloc(sizeof(int) * n);
    _mergeSort(values, aside, n);
    free(aside);
}

int main() {
    FILE *input;
    input = fopen("prova.txt", "r");
    if (!input) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Could not open file");
        return 1;
    }

    int maximum_n = 100000;
    int *array = malloc(sizeof(int)*maximum_n);
    int count;
    for (count = 0;count < maximum_n;count++) {
        if (fscanf(input, "%d", (array + count)) == EOF) {
            break;
        }
    }
    mergeSort(array, count);

    for(int k=0; k < count; k++) {
        printf("%d: %d \n", k, array[k]);
    }
    return 0;
}

Note that there is only one malloc call inside mergeSort now.

share|improve this answer

Advice regarding optimization of memory used:
1. If you want to allocate memory at every step (although this is is not necessary) make sure you free all the memory used when the temporary buffers are no longer needed.
2. There is no need to create buffers at every step. You can allocate a buffer at the beginning and use pointers within that array at every step of the algorithm.

And the problem is with the merge function. When you were reaching the end of one of your arrays (right or left) you were pointing to memory that you did not allocate. There, it found the value 0 which was always smaller than the values in the array that was left. So, you have to stop merging when one of your buffers is copied completely in the result and then copy what is left of the other.

You should change it to this:

int *merge(int left[], int right[], int n){
  int *ordinato, i=0, j=0, k;
  ordinato = malloc(sizeof(int)*n);
  while((i<n/2) && (j<n-n/2)){
      if(left[i] < right[j]){
          *(ordinato+i+j) = left[i];
          i++;
      }else{
          *(ordinato+i+j) = right[j];
          j++;
      }
  }
  while(i!=n/2){
       *(ordinato+i+j) = left[i];
       i++; 
  }
  while(j!=n-n/2){
       *(ordinato+i+j) = right[j];
       j++; 
  }
  return ordinato;      
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good answer, but you could explain what exactly was wrong with the merge function. Also, imho, i < n/2 makes it more obvious what is happening here. –  phihag Jul 7 '13 at 16:38
    
The problem was that when you were reaching the end of one of your arrays (right or left) you were pointing to memory that you did not allocate. There it found the value 0 which was always smaller than the values in the array that was left. So, you have to stop merging when one of your buffers is copied completely in the result and then copy what is left of the other. –  ionela.voinescu Jul 7 '13 at 16:44
    
Yes, please add that to the answer ;) Note that I'm a fellow answerer, and not the questioner. –  phihag Jul 7 '13 at 16:48

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