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First, I am really sorry for the poor quality of this code, but I have already spent 1 hour to isolate the source of my problems and I do not have a shorter example than this. So here is the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <utility>
#include <tuple>
#include <array>

template <class Crtp, class... Types>
struct Base
{
    template <
        unsigned int Index,
        class Type = typename std::tuple_element<Index, std::tuple<Types...> >::type
    >
    inline const Type& get() const {
        return std::get<Index>(data);
    }

    template <
        unsigned int Index,
        class Type = typename std::tuple_element<Index, std::tuple<Types...> >::type
    >
    inline Crtp& set(const Type& value) {
        std::get<Index>(data) = value; return static_cast<Crtp&>(*this);
    }

    std::tuple<Types...> data;
};

template <typename Type, unsigned int Size>
struct Derived : public Base<Derived<Type, Size>, std::array<Type, Size>>
{
    template <
        class... Args,
        class Template = decltype(std::declval<const Base<
            Derived<Type, Size>,
            std::array<Type, Size>
        >>().template get<0>(std::declval<Args>()...))
    >
    inline Template test(Args&&... args) const {
         return this->template get<0>(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    } 

    template <
        class... Args,
        class Template = decltype(std::declval<const Base<
           Derived<Type, Size>, 
           std::array<Type, Size>
        >>().template set<0>(std::declval<Args>()...))
    >
    inline Derived<Type, Size>& test(Args&&... args) {
        return this->template set<0>(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    } 

    static void check() {
         Derived<double, 3> derived;
         std::cout<<derived.test()[0]<<std::endl;
    }
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Derived<double, 3> derived;
    std::cout<<derived.test()[0]<<std::endl; // Working

    Derived<double, 3>::check(); // Not working: error: no match for ‘operator[]’ (operand types are ‘Derived<double, 3u>’ and ‘int’)
    return 0;
}

Explanation of what is done: There is a Base class that takes a derived class (CRTP) and tuple types as template arguments. This base class has two members: one to get the n-th element of the tuple, the other to set the n-th element of the tuple. Then, there is a Derived class that inherits from the Base class and put a std::array in the tuple of the base class: consequently, the type of data of this derived class is : std::tuple<std::array<Type, Size>> data. This derived class has an overloaded function test() which calls the get or set function depending on its argument: test() will call get() but test(std::array<double, 3>{1, 2, 3}) will call set(std::array<double, 3>{1, 2, 3}). Consequently test()[0] should return the first element of the array: it works in the main(), but it does not work in a static function.

I do not know what the compiler is trying to do, but apparently this is not working. I think that this is a bug in g++ 4.8.1 (I have not tried other versions) but I wanted to be sure of that.

So here are my questions:

  • Can you confirm this bug (and maybe find an explanation)?
  • Do you have a shorter and less complicated example to illustrate the problem?
share|improve this question
3  
If you suspect a compiler bug, trying another compiler should be your first choice before posting on SO... –  Marc Glisse Jul 7 '13 at 18:57
    
Do not compile under g++4.7.2 (tested on ideone), but compiles under clang++ 3.2.1... –  Vincent Jul 7 '13 at 19:01
    
I think GCC is correct. Your test function is const, so it will only be called when the object is const. It works on GCC if you add const to Derived<double,3> derived => Derived<double,3> const derived and it works. –  bennofs Jul 7 '13 at 19:22
1  
If GCC is correct, then why this is working in the main and not in the static function ? Furthermore, I've just realized that Derived<Type, Size> derived seems to work. So is it a compiler bug or not ? –  Vincent Jul 7 '13 at 19:31
1  
Looks like a bug in GCC to me. And occurs with GCC 4.9 (snapshot from 20130708) as well. –  jogojapan Jul 16 '13 at 6:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

"What the compiler is trying to do" is incorrectly performing overload resolution between the const and non-const overloads of Derived::test when called with no arguments inside check(). You can see by inserting

std::cout << typeid(decltype(derived.test())).name() << std::endl;

in both check() ("7DerivedIdLj3EE") and main() ("St5arrayIdLy3EE").

EDIT: A bit of investigation, alternately commenting out the const/nonconst test overload, shows that template deduction is not failing for the non-constant overload of test in check() as it should. The parameter pack Args is empty, so substitution failure should occur in the decltype expression that determines the return type of set<0> with no arguments.

While you're pondering why, I suggest you simplify your code to avoid it:

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>
#include <tuple>
#include <array>

template <class Crtp, class... Types>
struct Base
{
    std::tuple<Types...> data;

    template <unsigned int Index>
    auto get() const -> decltype(std::get<Index>(data)) {
        return std::get<Index>(data);
    }

    template <unsigned int Index, typename T>
    Crtp& set(T&& value) {
        std::get<Index>(data) = std::forward<T>(value);
        return static_cast<Crtp&>(*this);
    }
};

template <typename Type, unsigned int Size>
struct Derived : public Base<Derived<Type, Size>, std::array<Type, Size>>
{
    auto test() const -> decltype(this->template get<0>()) {
        return this->template get<0>();
    }

    template <typename T>
    Derived& test(T&& value) {
        return this->template set<0>(std::forward<T>(value));
    }

    static void check() {
        Derived<double, 3> derived;
        std::cout << derived.test()[0] << std::endl;
    }
};

int main(int, char*[])
{
    Derived<double, 3> derived;
    std::cout << derived.test()[0] << std::endl;
    Derived<double, 3>::check();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Suppose I should specify all the analysis I'm performing is with GCC 4.8.1. –  Casey Jul 16 '13 at 7:13
    
I've reported the bug here: gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=57846 –  Vincent Jul 16 '13 at 9:53

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