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For my project use, I need to store certain amount (~100x100) of floats in two dimensional array. And during the function calculation I need to read and write to the array and since the function is really the bottleneck (consuming 98% of time) I really would need it to be fast.

I did some experiments with numpy and cython:

import numpy
import time
cimport numpy
cimport cython

cdef int col, row

DTYPE = numpy.int
ctypedef numpy.int_t DTYPE_t
cdef numpy.ndarray[DTYPE_t, ndim=2] matrix_c = numpy.zeros([100 + 1, 100 + 1], dtype=DTYPE)

time_ = time.time()
for l in xrange(5000):
    for col in xrange(100):
        for row in xrange(100):
            matrix_c[<unsigned int>row + 1][<unsigned int>col + 1] = matrix_c[<unsigned int>row][<unsigned int>col]
print "Numpy + cython time: {0}".format(time.time() - time_)

but I found out that in spite of all my attempts, the version using python lists, is still significantly faster.

Code using lists:

matrix = []
for i in xrange(100 + 1):
    matrix.append([])
    for j in xrange(100 + 1):
        matrix[i].append(0)

time_ = time.time()
for l in xrange(5000):
    for col in xrange(100):
        for row in xrange(100):
            matrix[row + 1][col + 1] = matrix[row][col]
print "list time: {0}".format(time.time() - time_)

And results:

list time: 0.0141758918762
Numpy + cython time: 0.484772920609

Have I done something wrong? If not, is there anything that would help me to improve the results?

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1  
numpy is fast when you make vectorial operations. Accessing elements one by one is slower than normal python access, since numpy has to create/destroy python objects each time. –  Bakuriu Jul 7 '13 at 19:48
    
Yes I have read that, but I thought, that using cythons powers it would work faster. –  Jendas Jul 7 '13 at 19:49
    
You forgot to type the indices of the loops. Without this cython isn't doing almost any optimization. Try to give a type declaration for row and col; this should allow major optimizations by cython. (Refer to cython'd documentation "for i in range(...): ... may be optimized to a C for loop if i is a cdef int,") –  Bakuriu Jul 7 '13 at 19:49
1  
Oh, sorry. Being right under the imports I skipped that line. I'd suggest to use the -a command line option and analyse the html output to see if the code is optimized or not) –  Bakuriu Jul 7 '13 at 19:53
5  
Are you sure that is the cython code you are actually using? On my machine the numpy + cython version takes about 25 seconds, while the python one takes 10 seconds. Changing matrix_c[row+1][col+1] = matrix_c[row][col] to matrix_c[row+1, col+1] = matrix_c[row, col] reduces the time to 0.11 seconds(i.e. a 200x speed-up). Doing matrix_c[row + 1][col + 1] first creates a view for the row, then for the given column, then assigns the value, and there is some(a lot of) overhead there. Certainly faster than copying, but still slower than direct access via [x, y] notation. –  Bakuriu Jul 7 '13 at 20:47
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's my version of the code you have. There are three functions, dealing with integer arrays, 32 bit floating point arrays and double precision floating point arrays, respectively.

from numpy cimport ndarray as ar
cimport numpy as np
import numpy as np
cimport cython
import time

@cython.boundscheck(False)
@cython.wraparound(False)
def access_write_int(ar[int,ndim=2] c, int n):
    cdef int l, col, row, h=c.shape[0], w=c.shape[1]
    time_ = time.time()
    for l in range(n):
        for row in range(h-1):
            for col in range(w-1):
                c[row+1,col+1] = c[row,col]
    print "Numpy + cython time: {0}".format(time.time() - time_)

@cython.boundscheck(False)
@cython.wraparound(False)
def access_write_float(ar[np.float32_t,ndim=2] c, int n):
    cdef int l, col, row, h=c.shape[0], w=c.shape[1]
    time_ = time.time()
    for l in range(n):
        for row in range(h-1):
            for col in range(w-1):
                c[row+1,col+1] = c[row,col]
    print "Numpy + cython time: {0}".format(time.time() - time_)

@cython.boundscheck(False)
@cython.wraparound(False)
def access_write_double(ar[double,ndim=2] c, int n):
    cdef int l, col, row, h=c.shape[0], w=c.shape[1]
    time_ = time.time()
    for l in range(n):
        for row in range(h-1):
            for col in range(w-1):
                c[row+1,col+1] = c[row,col]
    print "Numpy + cython time: {0}".format(time.time() - time_)

To call these functions from Python I run this

import numpy as np
from numpy.random import rand, randint

print "integers"
c = randint(0, high=20, size=(101,101))
access_write_int(c, 5000)
print "32 bit float"
c = rand(101, 101).astype(np.float32)
access_write_float(c, 5000)
print "double precision"
c = rand(101, 101)
access_write_double(c, 5000)

The following changes are important:

  1. Avoid slicing the array by accessing it using indices of the form [i,j] instead of [i][j]

  2. Define the variables l, col, and row, as integers so that the for loops run in C.

  3. Use the function decorators @cython.boundscheck(False) and '@cython.wraparound(False)` to turn off boundschecking and wraparound indexing for the key portion of the program. This allows for out of bounds memory accesses, so you should do this only when you are certain that your indices are what they should be.

  4. Swap the two innermost for loops so that you access your array according to how it is arranged in memory. This makes a much bigger difference for larger arrays. The arrays given by np.zeros np.random.rand, etc. are usually C contiguous, so rows are stored in contiguous blocks and it is faster to vary the index along the rows in the outer for loop and not the inner one. If you want to keep the for loops as they are, consider taking the transpose of your array before you run the function on it so that the columns are in contiguous blocks instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Many of these are included in the other answer, but I figured this would be more helpful than an elaborate comment. Also, if you want to turn off the wraparound for a specific block you can do with cython.boundscheck(False): and if you want to turn it off for the whole file, include the comment #cython: boundscheck=False at the top as discussed at wiki.cython.org/enhancements/compilerdirectives –  IanH Aug 8 '13 at 15:29
    
Also, if it is just this particular operation, you would probably be fine just using c[1:,1:] = c[:-1,:-1] instead of the inner two for loops. Vectorization can be a good solution when it applies. –  IanH Aug 8 '13 at 15:46
    
Eventually I figure this out and convert the structures to pure C float arrays but thank you anyway. Perhaps your detailed answer will help someone dealing with the same problem. –  Jendas Aug 10 '13 at 16:15
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The problem seems to be the way you are accessing the matrix elements.

Use [i,j] instead of [i][j].

Also you can remove the casting <>, which prevent wrong values from being taken but increase the function call overhead.

Also, I would use range instead of xrange since in all Cython the examples from the documentation they are using range.

The result will be something like:

import numpy
import time
cimport numpy
cimport cython

cdef int col, row

INT = numpy.int
ctypedef numpy.int_t cINT
cdef numpy.ndarray[cINT, ndim=2] matrix_c = numpy.zeros([100 + 1, 100 + 1], dtype=INT)

time_ = time.time()
for l in range(5000):
    for col in range(100):
        for row in range(100):
            matrix_c[row + 1, col + 1] = matrix_c[row, col]
print "Numpy + cython time: {0}".format(time.time() - time_)

Strongly recommended reference:

- Working with NumPy in Cython

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