Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Sorry about the title.

I have a system that is part of a service oriented architecture. It receives messages and processes them. The process can be simply boiled down into moving data from location to another. All decisions the system makes can be made by inspecting two different classes that the system always has available:

  1. The message that is being processed
  2. The configuration information for the particular data operation (moving from where to where etc)

Here are the main interfaces

    public interface IComponent
    {
        bool CanHandle(Message theMessage, Configuration theConfiguration);
        int Priority {get;}
    }

    public interface IComponentLocator<T>
        where T : IComponent
    {
        public LocateComponent(Message theMessage, Configuration theConfiguration);
    }

I use the Castle Windsor framework for dependency inversion concerns, so my one implemented locator receives all of the appropriate components injected via the array resolver.

Here it is:

public class InjectedComponentsLocator<T> : IComponentLocator<T>
    where T : IComponent
{
    private readonly T[] components;

    public InjectedComponentsLocator(T[] components)
    {
        this.components = components;
        this.components.OrderBy((component) => component.Priority);
    }

    public T LocateComponent(Message theMessage, Configuration theConfiguration)
    {
        List<T> candidates = this.components.Where((h) => h.CanHandle(message, configuration)).ToList();

        if (candidates.Count == 0)
        {
            throw new Exception(string.Format(Resources.UnableToLocateComponentException, typeof(T).Name));
        }
        else if (candidates.Count > 1 && candidates[0].Priority == candidates[1].Priority)
        {
            throw new Exception(string.Format(Resources.AmbiguousComponentException, candidates[0].GetType().Name, candidates[1].GetType().Name));
        }

        return candidates.First();
    }
}

Now to the question. The Priority property on the IComponent interface.. I don't like it. The reality is the priority should be able to be determined by the most specific IComponent.

For example, let's say I have two components.

    public class HandlesOneRecord : IComponent
    {
        public bool CanHandle(Message theMessage, Configuration theConfiguration)
        {
            return theMessage.BatchSize == 1;
        }
    }

    public class HandlesOneInsert : IComponent
    {
        public bool CanHandle(Message theMessage, Configuration theConfiguration)
        {
            return theMessage.BatchSize == 1 && theMessage.Action = "Insert";
        }
    }

I want the system to know that an insert message for one record needs to choose the second one because it's the most specific one. Right now I would need to set differing priority levels and that just feels like it will get unwieldy and create bugs when creating new components down the line.

Added for attempt at clarification:
If the system ends up working the way I envision, I will be able to have two components one that will handle ANY "insert" type action and also a specific component that will handle an "insert" where the batchsize = 1. Any developer writing code shouldn't have to care that the system picks the right one, it just will.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Out of curiosity, if you only want one component to handle a given message, why have more than one component be able to handle it? – Bob Horn Jul 8 '13 at 1:10
2  
Not sure if this is what works for you here, but maybe look into the Chain of Responsibility design pattern. One component would be the starting component, and if it can't handle the message, it would pass it to the next component, and so on. – Bob Horn Jul 8 '13 at 1:12
    
I have greatly oversimplified to get at the root of the issue, that's probably why it feels contrived. As far as chain of responsibility, I considered it. I couldn't come up with a way that I didn't have the same problem in the chain, and that is, determining which one is the most specific. – greyalien007 Jul 8 '13 at 4:45
    
What about a key/value pair mapping in an app.config or database? The key would be the part of message that the components care about. And the value would be the type/component best responsible for handling it. Then you could have a factory method that uses reflection to find and activate the correct component based on the key. – Bob Horn Jul 8 '13 at 11:43
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could do this potentially by using a scoring system.

public sealed class Score
{
    private int _score;

    public Score(params bool[] conditions)
    {
        foreach(bool b in conditions)
        {
           if(b)
              ++_score;
           else
           {
              _score = 0;
              break;
           }
        }
    } // eo ctor

    public int Total { get { return _score; } }
}  // eo class Score

Your IComponent might look like this:

public interface IComponent
{
    Score CanHandle(Message theMessage, Configuration theConfiguration);
}  // eo IComponent

Specialisations:

public class HandlesOneRecord : IComponent
{
    public Score CanHandle(Message theMessage, Configuration theConfiguration)
    {
        return new Score(theMessage.BatchSize == 1);
    }
}

public class HandlesOneInsert : IComponent
{
    public Score CanHandle(Message theMessage, Configuration theConfiguration)
    {
        return new Score(theMessage.BatchSize == 1, theMessage.Action == "Insert");
    }
}

Then to find the most appropriate handler, iterate through and pick the one with the largest score. If you have 100s of handlers, you could increase the performance of this by generating a hash code for Message, and storing successful lookups in a Dictionary<int, Func<Message, Configuration, Score>>.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this, however, It's not so much that the component with the most "true" wins. It's more about the functions that evaluate to true. If all of the functions in one component that evaluate to true are the exact same functions that evaluate to true in another component AND the second component has any number of other functions that also evaluate to true, I need to choose the second function. That make sense? – greyalien007 Jul 8 '13 at 14:57
1  
So why not use that as your algorithm then? Have a facade/factory call GetScore() on each component. Then have the factory return the component with the highest score. – Bob Horn Jul 8 '13 at 15:31
    
@greyalien007, in that case then the second component would have a higher score, no? – Moo-Juice Jul 8 '13 at 18:17
    
You're totally right, I get it now. Being that they were both chosen because they were identified as possible handlers it does just come down to how many function results end up being true. Thanks for the help! – greyalien007 Jul 8 '13 at 22:51

Seeing as your domain is already fairly message-oriented, have you considered using some kind of message bus like NServiceBus?

These types of infrastructure have the message handling pipeline you seem to be looking for, including things like dispatching to handlers based on type, and even with polymorphism as well as the ability to define the order of handlers and for each handler to be able to stop the pipeline.

share|improve this answer
    
My SoA is running on RhinoBus currently. I have a consumer/dispatcher pattern that does just as you suggest. All of the work I'm talking about is taking place after a consume operation has received a message appropriate for the current endpoint. The consume then invokes the appropriate processor for the message. Inside of the processor I do all the logic this post is talking about. Now maybe what you're saying is that I should have my framework make more decisions for me (or maybe you weren't : )). I'll check into that, thanks for the response. – greyalien007 Jul 8 '13 at 14:52
    
I didn't realize the RhinoBus doesn't have those abilities - so, um, yeah. – Udi Dahan Jul 9 '13 at 12:57
    
It could. I created our own interfaces for bus technology and created an adapter for rhino bus so I could throw away rhino later if it wasn't good enough. I'll poke around more. – greyalien007 Jul 21 '13 at 18:53

It seems you want to choose a Component based on the data contained in a message rather than its type.

The Specification pattern could make for a nice, extensible option. You could have a Chain of Responsibility as suggested by Bob Horn where each Component would determine if it can handle a Message based on the Specification that was injected into it. Something along these lines :

public abstract class Component 
{
  protected Component _next;
  protected MessageSpecification _specification;

  public Component(MessageSpecification specification)
  {
    // Inject specification here
  }

  public void Inspect(Message message)
  {
    if (_specification.IsSatisfiedBy(message))
    {
       Handle(message);
    }
    else _next.Inspect(message);
  }

  abstract void Handle(Message message);
}

In other parts of your system, you would need to :

  • Define each concrete component and the associated specification if any.

  • Assemble the Chain of Responsibility in a particular order. This could be done based on domain rules (which you're the only one to possibly know), or, assuming all your Specifications are mutually exclusive, by placing all Specification-based Components first in the chain.

share|improve this answer
1  
A nice thought, but in the OPs example, HandlesOneRecord could be used in both circumstances, but HandlesOneInsert is a more specialized version and he or she would want that one instead. – Moo-Juice Jul 8 '13 at 12:39
    
Well that would work using the following Specifications : message => message.BatchSize == 1 and message => message.BatchSize == 1 && message.Action = "Insert" wouldn't it ? – guillaume31 Jul 8 '13 at 13:28
    
Admittedly, I may have misunderstood your answer, but the HandlesOneRecord would be satisfied when it inspected the message batch-size and HandlesOneInsert would never get a look in? – Moo-Juice Jul 8 '13 at 13:33
    
Not if the chain was assembled in the right order, that is most restrictive Components first. +1'ed your solution though since it's precisely a good way of defining that order ;) – guillaume31 Jul 8 '13 at 13:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.