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Hello I'm trying t instantiate an object from a class that extends its super class and its constructor super but am having hard times with the Java accepting arguments in the constructor of the instantiated object, can someone please help me out, thank you! Here's the program:

public class Box {

    double width;
    double height;
    double depth;

    Box(Box ob)
        {
            this.width=ob.width;
            this.height=ob.height;
            this.depth=ob.depth;           
        }
    Box(double width, double height, double depth)
        {
            this.width=width;
            this.height=height;
            this.depth=depth;
        }

    double volume()
        {
            return width * height * depth;
        }


}


public class BoxWeight extends Box{

    double weight;
    BoxWeight(BoxWeight object)
        {
            super(object);
            this.weight=object.weight;
        }
    BoxWeight(double w, double h, double d, double wei)
        {

            super(w,h,d);
            this.weight=wei;
        }

}


public class Proba {


    public static void main(String[] args) {

        BoxWeight myBox1 = new BoxWeight();
        BoxWeight myBox2 = new BoxWeight();

    }
}

Now, the error comes up whenever I try to pass the arguments into the BoxWeight() constructor in the main class.

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closed as off-topic by Brian Roach, R.J, Luv, mishik, Stefan Steinegger Jul 8 '13 at 6:46

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2  
What error?.... –  Oli Charlesworth Jul 7 '13 at 21:21
    
You are not passing any parameters into the constructors in main()???! Please clarify. Read this also - stackoverflow.com/questions/how-to-ask –  OldProgrammer Jul 7 '13 at 21:23
    
OK, whenever I try to pass the arguments into the constructor or leave them blank as they now are Net Beans throws an error showing 2 red circles right in the lines of the last 2 lines of code in the Proba class: BoxWeight myBox1 = new BoxWeight(); BoxWeight myBox2 = new BoxWeight(); no suitable constructor found for BoxWeight() constructor BoxWeight.BoxWeight(double,double,double,double) is not applicable (actual and formal argument lists differ in length) constructor BoxWeight.BoxWeight(BoxWeight) is not applicable (actual and formal argument lists differ in length) –  Ivan Ćeličanin Jul 7 '13 at 21:25
1  
Well, you just answered your own question! You have no default constructor. –  OldProgrammer Jul 7 '13 at 21:25
    
What do you mean I have no default constructor? I have 2 constructors in the BoxWeight class? Please fill me in on the blanks if I am wrong. –  Ivan Ćeličanin Jul 7 '13 at 21:30
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1 Answer

You're defining two constructors for BoxWeight

BoxWeight(BoxWeight object)
BoxWeight(double w, double h, double d, double wei)

but try to use one without parameters

BoxWeight myBox1 = new BoxWeight();

So you either need to supply another instance when constructing your object like this:

BoxWeight myBox1 = new BoxWeight(someOtherBox);

or use the constructor with individually defined values:

BoxWeight myBox1 = new BoxWeight(myWidth, myHeight, myDepth, myWeight);

or define a no-args constructor for your BoxWeight which either calls one of the existing Box constructors or another newly-created one without parameters.

BoxWeight() {
    super(...)
}

If you're used to calling a no-args constructor without actually defining one, this is because Java supplies a default constructor, but only as long as you don't define any constructor yourself. See this page for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh I hear you, thank you very much sir. –  Ivan Ćeličanin Jul 7 '13 at 21:32
    
If your problem is solved, please mark the answer that helped you most as accepted. –  Michael Lang Jul 7 '13 at 21:36
    
Yes, I knew that, if I don't build a constructor myself somewhere in the problem, Java does it for me by default creating a no-args one but I did not know I was supposed to put up a no-args one when creating several other parametric constructors. Thank You! –  Ivan Ćeličanin Jul 7 '13 at 21:50
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