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I'm not really sure how best to explain what I want, so I'll just show some code:

class Stuffclass():
    def add(self, x, y):
        return x + y

    def subtract(self, x, y):
        return x - y

    # imagine that there are 20-30 other methods in here (lol)

class MyClass:
    def __init__(self):
        self.st = Stuffclass()

    def doSomething(self):
        return self.st.add(1, 2)

m = MyClass()
m.doSomething() # will print 3
# Now, what I want to be able to do is:
print m.add(2, 3) # directly access the "add" method of MyClass.st
print m.subtract(10, 5) # directly access the "subtract" method of MyClass.st
m.SomeMethod() # execute function MyClass.st.SomeMethod

I know I could do something like this:

class MyClass:
    def __init__(self):
        self.st = Stuffclass()
        self.add = self.st.add
        self.subtract = self.st.subtract

...but this requires manually assigning all possible attributes.

I'm writing all the classes so I can guarantee no name collisions.

Making MyClass a subclass of Stuffclass won't work, because I actually am using this in a plugin-based application, where MyClass loads other code dynamically using import. This means MyClass can't subclass from the plugin, because the plugin could be anything that follows my API.

Advice please?

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While Ashwini's answer will work, Stuffclass should just be a module. –  Pavel Anossov Jul 7 '13 at 21:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe that writing a getattr function for your class will let you do what you want.

Called when an attribute lookup has not found the attribute in the usual places (i.e. it is not an instance attribute nor is it found in the class tree for self). name is the attribute name. This method should return the (computed) attribute value or raise an AttributeError exception

So something as simple as:

def __getattr__(self, name):
    if hasattr(self.st, name):
        return getattr(self.st, name)
    else:
        raise AttributeError

should do roughly what you're after.

But, having answered (I think) the question you asked, I'm going to move on to the question I think you should have asked.

I actually am using this in a plugin-based application, where MyClass loads other code dynamically using import. This means MyClass can't subclass from the plugin, because the plugin could be anything that follows my API

I can see why MyClass can't be a subclass of StuffClass; but couldn't StuffClass be a subclass of MyClass? If you defined the inheritance that way, you'd have a guarantee what StuffClass implements all the basic stuff in MyClass, and also that your instances of StuffClass have all the extra methods defined in StuffClass.

From your mention that the plugins need to "follows my API", I'm assuming that might be a case where you need to ensure that the plugins implement a set of methods in order to conform with the API; but since the implementation of the methods is going to depend on the specifics of the plugin, you can't provide those functions in MyClass. In that case, it sounds as though defining an Abstract Base Class that your plugins are required to inherit from might be useful for you.

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1  
Thank you! I noticed I can also use this to export only specific things - if (name in [some list]):... –  fdmillion Jul 7 '13 at 22:22

Use __getattr__ to delegate the calls to Stuffclass's instance:

class MyClass:
    def __init__(self):
        self.st = Stuffclass()

    def __getattr__(self,attr):
        return getattr(self.st,attr)

Demo:

>>> from so import *
>>> m = MyClass()
>>> m.add(1,2)
3
>>> m.subtract(100,2)
98
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