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I need just a little more help on my BST. This is what my BST looks like when inserting:

R, L, J, G

                      R   --Root at Index 0
                     / \
     L @ Index1     L   NULL
                   / \
     J @ Index3   J   NULL
                 / \
     G @ Index7 G  NULL

Here is the code that makes it happen.

void BST::insert(const data &aData)
{   
    if ( items[Parent].empty ) 
    {
	    items[Parent].theData = aData; // insert at leaf.
	    items[Parent].empty = false;
	    size++;

	    return;
    }			
    for ( int i = 0; i <= size; i++ )
    {
	    if ( aData < items[Parent].theData )
	    {
	 	    if ( items[2*i+1].empty )
		    {
			items[2*i+1].theData = aData;
			items[2*i+1].empty = false;
		    }
		    else 
                           {
			// we must already have a left child to some root.
                                Parent++;  So make the previous data the root???
			if ( items[Parent].empty )
			{
				items[Parent].theData = items[2*i+1].theData;
				items[Parent].empty   = false;
				Parent = (i-1)/2;
			}
                           } 
	    }
	    else
	    { ...// do the same for data greater than but with items[2*i+2] }

MY question is that when would i need to make a new root? When would I need to make a new root? For recomparison?

Is this approach correct? Thank you to those who even both to look at my posts :)

// The constructor the BST Class and its private section.

BST::BST(int capacity) : items(new item[capacity]), size(0), Parent(0), 
leftChild(0), rightChild(0)
{
    items->empty = true;
    maxSize = capacity;
}
private:
    int size;  // size of the ever growing/expanding tree :)
    int Parent;
    int maxSize;	
    int leftChild;
    int rightChild;
    struct item
    {
	    bool empty;
	    data theData;
    };
    item *items;    // The tree array
share|improve this question
    
Can you simplify the problem so it's feasible to include complete code? Or write it in (complete) pseudo code? Not indicating what things like item, Parent, data, etc. are makes it hard to decipher what you're doing. –  Roger Pate Nov 17 '09 at 21:03
    
Why are you using an array? –  Loki Astari Nov 17 '09 at 21:06
    
I post the constructor, and also its private section where i define the my array for the data. Sorry about that! –  user40120 Nov 17 '09 at 21:07

2 Answers 2

Your logic (rather fuzzy I must say) appears to be wrong: What kind of "if" sequence is that?

if ( items[2*i+1].empty )
{
}
else if (!items[2*i+1].empty)
{
   if ( items[2*i+1].empty )
   {
        // any code here is unreachable
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I wondered that myself. It kept going so i didnt question it. –  user40120 Nov 17 '09 at 21:16
    
I thought that if i could at least construct it. Going back to make it better would be easy. Its hard for me to write efficient code the first time around. –  user40120 Nov 17 '09 at 21:17
    
I guess what I needed it to do their is for the loop to iterate –  user40120 Nov 17 '09 at 21:21

I suggest you reimplement this to work recursively. Something like this:

void BST::insert(const data& aData, int pos) {
    if (items[pos].empty) {
        // insert it here
    }
    else (aData < items[pos].theData) {
        // go to left child
        insert(aData, 2*pos + 1);
    }
    else {
        // go to right child
        insert(aData, 2*pos + 2);
    }
}

It's not really clear what Parent, leftChild, and rightChild are doing in your class, but that's a separate issue.

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